Health | KCUR

Health

KCUR's health team focuses on health issues and their impact in Missouri and Kansas. Working with journalists at other public media stations and news outlets, reporters Dan Margolies and Alex Smith strive to bring listeners and readers timely, accurate and comprehensive coverage of a topic that leaves no one untouched.

Elana Gordon / KCUR

U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius is in Kansas City today, drawing attention to developments in health information technology.

Christi Nielsen

NOTE: Audio is unavailable from today's show. We apologize for the technical difficulties.

Consumers are getting smarter about the food they eat.  We know to check labels for the levels of sodium and saturated fat, and that "high fructose corn syrup" is still sugar.   Most of us hit a wall though when it comes to ingredients such as malodextrin, flavonoids and silicon dioxide.  What are these ingredients found in the  foods we eat and drink

Advances In Telemedicine

Jan 16, 2012

You’ve heard of telecommuting, telekinesis and televangelism – but what about telemedicine? On Tuesday's Central Standard, a look at developments in a technology that helps doctors treat patients remotely – improving patient care everywhere from urban schools to rural areas.

flickr/Martin Cathrae

Eating healthy doesn't have to be a chore.

On Friday's Walt Bodine Show, join co-host Charles Ferruzza and the Food Critics for a conversation about finding tasty, yet nutritious food options in Kansas City.

KC's Oldest Community Health Center Has A New Home

Jan 3, 2012
Elana Gordon / KCUR

Kansas City’s oldest community health center has a new home.  Samuel Rodgers Health Center will start seeing patients at its new facility this week.

The main clinic on Ninth Street and Euclid Ave. treats thousands of uninsured and underinsured patients annually. The building has been open for forty years, but Hilda Fuentes, the Executive Director, says it’s time to move.

“We had tiles on the floor that were falling off, and we did not know when our heating and ac system was going to fall into total disrepair,” says Fuentes.

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – Area health agencies are reminding eligible seniors and those with disabilities that now's the time to sign up or review their Medicare coverage. That's because Medicare's open enrollment period ends a lot earlier this year.

People typically have until the end of this month to enroll in or make changes to their Medicare plans. But this year's deadline is in two days.

"Midnight, December 7th," says Carol Behan, director of CLAIM, Missouri's free Medicare counseling program.

KANSAS CITY, MO. (KCUR) - When the Kansas City Star used a federal database this summerto investigate the way doctors are monitored in the region, and matched anonymous records from the database to a specific doctor, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services responded by, among other things, restricting access to the entire public database.

New Study: Business Not Affected By Smoking Ban

Jan 24, 2011

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – Kansas City's smoking ban has had little, if any, impact on business at area eating and drinking establishments. That's according to a new study, which looked at sales data before and after the ban was enacted in 2008.

John Taurus, an economics professor at the University of Illinois-Chicago, coauthored the study. He says any changes in sales that did take place were related to the overall economic climate.

Widely Used Pesticide Under Scrutiny

Jun 15, 2010

Salina, KS – Atrazine is one of the most widely used weed-killers in the country. But farm fields aren't the only place the chemical is commonly found. It's also the most widely-detected pesticide in drinking water, especially in the Midwest. With some environmental groups calling for a ban on Atrazine, the Environmental Protection Agency is currently re-evaluating its safety. Kansas Public Radio's Bryan Thomspon reports.

 

Kansas City, Mo. – About 1.6 million Missourians struggle to understand information about their health. As a result, area health leaders are launching a new initiative to improve health literacy across the state.

The nonprofit group, Health Literacy Missouri, is leading the project. Arthur Culbert is the group's president and says misunderstandings about health care are far too common.

"How many times have you seen a doctor and you walk out and it's like, 'I'm not really sure what he said,'" Culbert says.

Kansas City, Mo. – Federal health officials arrive at the Banister Federal Complex today, the latest part of an ongoing investigation of possible hazards inside the General Services Administration's (GSA's) side of the complex. It's the first time health officials have been called in.

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