gun violence | KCUR

gun violence

UMKC student Ravi Anand Naidu wearing headphones and seated in front of a microphone at KCUR studios.
Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Does Kansas City have a bad reputation within the Indian community? 

Indian nationals coming to America often have to worry about immigration hurdles and racism. Two violent incidents since 2017 in the Kansas City metro have added violence to their list of concerns. Most recently, Sharath Koppu, a UMKC student from India was shot and killed during a robbery at the restaurant where he worked. Today, representatives of the Indian community revealed their views of living here.

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Updated 3:50 p.m. Wednesday, July 11, 2018

The remains of University of Missouri-Kansas City student Sharath Koppu are back in India and being prepared for traditional Hindu last rites.

Courtesy Wyandotte County Sheriff's Office Inmate Search website

Updated at 6 p.m. with additional details.

A Kansas City, Kansas, man who’s “well known” to police and already accused of several crimes — including first-degree murder — is charged with two counts of capital murder in the fatal shootings of two Wyandotte County sheriff’s deputies.

Sophie Tulp

As Cameron Kasky was living through the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, what scared him most wasn’t the confusion or the fear of losing his life.

“The most terrifying feeling was that I knew what was happening,” Kasky said.

“It was a mass school shooting. We had seen these,” he said. “People in my generation, we had grown up on them.”

ANDREA TUDHOPE/KCUR 89.3

Survivors of the February shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, will host a town hall in Kansas City, Kansas, Monday night as part of a national tour.

NPR reports that March For Our Lives, the organization founded by the student activists who put together the event of the same name in Washington, D.C. three months ago, will make more than 50 stops in 20 states as part of the tour, including the 6 p.m. event Monday at Reardon Convention Center.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Josie Hoskins said he thought of his own life story as "super normal" — until he saw other people's reaction to it.

"I was around six years old when my mom took me aside and ... explained, one, how to spot an overdose and, two, what to do if I saw her with an overdose."

Josie Hoskins seated in the KCUR studio wearing headphones and with a microphone in front of him.
Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Few infected convicts in Missouri prisons are receiving newer hepatitis C drugs that are more effective, and more expensive.

Jessica Wohl

Artist Jessica Wohl searches for what everyone has in common — even if it’s a testy desire to be heard.

By looking at the seven quilts she’ll show in Weinberger Fine Art’s new exhibition, “Thoughts And Prayers,” it’s hard to say what Wohl’s political leanings are. But she contends that her particular opinions are not the point of this collection.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

After complaints arose that administrators allegedly censored students during recent nationwide walkouts, the Shawnee Mission School District announced it will take measures to train district officials on First Amendment rights.

Last week, the American Civil Liberties Union threatened to sue the district if it didn't address allegations that administrators restricted students' participation in the April 20 walkouts protesting gun violence.

Karen Almond / KC Rep/Facebook

In his new play, Nathan Louis Jackson draws on his own life to tackle the issue of gun violence.

Brother Toad” tells the story of two men who are related but going down different paths.

“Each path ends with the decision of ‘how do I protect myself and the ones I love?’” Jackson told host Gina Kaufmann on KCUR’s Central Standard.

Segment 1: A new play about gun violence in Kansas.

Nathan Louis Jackson's new play, "Brother Toad," is set in Wyandotte County and Johnson County. It's about two men who are going down different paths when it comes to protecting their families. Hear more about the play and about Jackson's changing views on guns.

Claire Verbeck / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Why a consent decree between Kansas City and the EPA is impacting how much you pay for sewer services.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Tourniquets may be an old concept; they may also be the key to keeping gunshot victims from bleeding to death.

Health professionals at Truman Medical Center in Kansas City, Missouri, have been training Kansas City police officers and school administrators how to "Stop the Bleed." It's a campaign out of the White House to raise awareness and train first responders and civilians on basic practices to stop life-threatening bleeding.

Laura Ziegler / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: How Jackson County leaders are handling political and personal controversies, and rising crime rates.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Jackson County Prosecutor Jean Peters Baker says gun violence survivors don't just fall through the cracks.

"They're not cracks. They're gaping holes in our criminal justice system," she says.

That's why Baker, along with the AdHoc Group Against Crime and Jackson County COMBAT, has launched a new program called Caring for Crime Survivors.

Jim McLean / Kansas News Service

Even in the wake of national and local protests, students and others pushing for tighter gun laws say, state and federal lawmakers from Kansas refuse to tackle even “common sense” firearm rules.

Thousands rallied across the state over the weekend. They called for stronger background checks. They pushed an assault weapons ban. And they pleaded for laws to extract guns from homes where suicide and domestic violence appear imminent.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Thousands came to Kansas City's Theis Park Saturday afternoon to join with protests around the world demanding action against gun violence. The "March for Our Lives" events were organized and inspired by the student survivors of last month's school shooting in Parkland, Florida.

Greg Echlin / KCUR 89.3

Kansas City native Amaad Wainright already has had some big moments with the Kansas State men’s basketball team, including the team's run to the NCAA Tournament Sweet 16 and a season-high 35 minutes played during a Big 12 tournament loss to conference champion Kansas earlier this month.

Cody Newill / KCUR 89.3

The total number of homicides has been rising and falling for decades here in Kansas City, Missouri. Right now, we're in the midst of a scary climb. It's easy in times like these to ask, why? We always seem to start there. We want to change the conversation. 

Laura Ziegler / KCUR 89.3

Law enforcement officers in Kansas City are engaged in an innovative approach to fighting violent crime.

In 2016, the Jackson County Prosecutor’s Office and the Kansas City Police Department won grants from the U.S. Department of Justice to use data and community involvement to attack the city’s violent crime rate. Funds are being matched locally.

It’s led by a Yale Law School graduate with roots in the Mennonite community of Newton, Kansas.

Paul Andrews / http://paulandrewsphotography.com/

A little over a year ago, Sunayana Dumala’s husband, Srinivas Kuchibhotla, was shot and killed at an Olathe bar by a man who questioned whether he was in the country legally.

Back then, Dumala wondered whether she should stay in the United States. In a Facebook post, she wrote: “To answer the question that is in every immigrant’s mind, DO WE BELONG HERE? Is this the same country we dreamed of and is it still secure to raise our families and children here?”

Sunayana Dumala

Mar 16, 2018
Paul Andrews / www.paulandrewsphotography.com

How a local woman is emerging from tragedy to spread a message of love.

A little over a year ago, Sunayana Dumala's husband, Srinivas Kutchibhotla, was shot and killed in an Olathe bar. Back then, she questioned why she should stay in the United States.

As it turns out, she has stayed. Meet Sunayana; hear her story.

Tabetha Sullivan

Students throughout the Kansas City metro enjoyed the support of school administrators and even the mayor when they walked out of schools at 10 a.m. Wednesday to protest gun violence and remember students killed at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.

But the day went much differently for seven girls at William Chrisman High School, who earned five days of suspension after they decided not to adhere to the school-sanctioned walkout.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas News Service

Students across Kansas joined their peers elsewhere in the country by walking out of school Wednesday and into the national debate over guns.

The mid-morning walkouts took them to the streets, to the Kansas Statehouse and circling around their schools to mark the one-month anniversary of the nation’s latest mass school shooting.

Many of the protests centered on 17 minutes of silence, 60 seconds for each person killed during the Parkland, Florida, school shooting.

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

Students throughout the Kansas City metro exercised their right to free speech on Wednesday morning, leaving their schools to observe 17 minutes of silence in recognition of those killed at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, last week.

Segment 1: National School Walkout Day.

This morning, students around the country walked out of their classrooms to protest gun violence and to demand action on mass shootings. We hear about what happened in KC and examine whether schools have a role in fostering student activism.

Kansas City Police Department

An 80-year-old Raytown man was charged with three felonies Friday for chasing and shooting at a man and a pregnant woman he thought had stolen iron pipe from his business.

David G. Jungerman, who made headlines in October 2017 for shooting a homeless man connected to the killing of a Brookside attorney, was being held on $1 million bond.

Jim McLean / Kansas News Service

Republicans in the Kansas House on Tuesday unveiled a plan they say will make schools safer.

Really more of a plan to get a plan, it calls for the Kansas State Department of Education and state emergency response and law enforcement agencies to develop statewide standards for “safe and secure school buildings.”

Peggy Lowe / KCUR 89.3

A Kansas City man who gunned down a romantic rival was sentenced to two life sentences Thursday, despite a prosecutor’s plea for a 100-year term that could act as a deterrent to more “senseless killing.”

Dairian Stanley, 22, showed no emotion as Jackson County Circuit Court Judge Charles McKenzie handed down his sentence. Stanley was convicted of first-degree murder and armed criminal action but was acquitted of kidnapping.

file phone / PublicDomainPictures.net

Listening to news reports while driving to the Statehouse on the day after the deadly high school shooting in Florida, Kansas Sen. Barbara Bollier decided to redouble her efforts to put a “red flag” law on the books in Kansas.

She wants a system for temporarily confiscating guns from people deemed a risk to themselves or others.

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