GLBT

ACLU Sues Missouri Over Same-Sex Marriage Ban

Feb 13, 2014
Dan Verbeck / KCUR

The American Civil Liberties Union of Missouri  has filed suit, trying to overturn the state’s refusal to accept same-sex marriage.

The suit is in the name of a Kansas City couple and seven others around the State.

The suit assumes public attitudes have changed since the Missouri Constitution was altered to ban same-gender marriage a decade ago.  

Jim MacDonald and Andy Schuerman were legally married in Canada and are raising Schuerman’s  biological 3-year old daughter, Grace.

Legally married same-sex couples are suing the Kansas Department of Revenue over a policy that says they must file separate state tax returns. Kansas does not recognize same-sex marriages, but some other states and the federal government do.

Thomas Witt is with the group Equality Kansas. He says married same-sex couples in Kansas could file a single federal return but would be forced to file two separate state returns.

Imagine growing up in a pretty standard nuclear family. Then when you’re 15, your dad announces that he’s gay and that he and your mom are getting a divorce.

Joseph Keehn

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of playwright William Inge, whose classic plays like Bus Stop and Picnic drew on his formative years in Independence, Kansas. Though never openly gay, he did write a series of short plays featuring gay characters and stories that have seldom been seen.

Imagine growing up in a pretty standard nuclear family. Then when you’re 15, your dad announces that he’s gay and that he and your mom are getting a divorce.

Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender Missourians have less access to healthcare and tend to be less healthy than the general population. That’s according to a new report by the Missouri Foundation for Health.

Gay and Lesbian Archive of Mid-America

Back in 1966, Drew Schaeffer started a small group in Kansas City called the Phoenix society. 

Gay Marriage Stand Could Help Obama In Suburbia

May 11, 2012

Republicans rule rural areas, while any Democrat can count on running up big margins in most of the large cities in the country. That has left the suburbs as the main partisan battleground.

For several election cycles now, the presidency has been won or lost based on the vote among suburbanites in a few key states. That's likely to be true again this November.

And some political observers believe that President Obama took the calculated risk that his newfound support for gay marriage rights will boost his campaign in these all-important counties.

(This post has been revised.)

If anything could predictably induce torrents of Internet reaction, it would be a U.S. president making the surprise disclosure that he supports same-sex marriage. And so it has been following President Obama's Wednesday ABC News interview in which he said he personally backs gay marriage.

The 2012 presidential election was supposed to be about the economy, and even with President Obama's historic decision to make it known Wednesday that he supports same-sex marriage, that is still likely to be true.

But the president's decision to announce in an ABC News interview that he personally backs gay marriage could mean that at least one social issue may take a more prominent role in the election-year spotlight.

A Republican member of the Missouri House came out of the closet this week during a press conference on a bill that would limit public schools from discussing sexual orientation in the classroom. 

Mo. State Representative Zachary Wyatt told fellow members of the House of Representatives that he is gay this morning, according to the Kirksville Daily Express. He spoke out to denounce House Bill 2051, which would ban discussions of homosexuality in public schools.

Kansas City, Mo. – As Gay Pride Week wraps up in Kansas City, events at the Power and Light District and Richard L. Berkley Riverfront Park will feature local and national music headliners.

At a sit-down dinner under a massive tent tonight along the Missouri River, the walls will be lined with quilts. They are from The Names Project Foundation's Aids Memorial Quilt. The Aids Memorial Quilt is the living memorial to the thousands of men and women who've died of HIV-AIDS. Friends and family sew personal messages on quilt panels about victims of the disease.

Kansas City, Mo. – Gay and lesbian couples who consider themselves married, whether they legally are married or not,will be counted that way in the current census. That marks a shift from previous years.

In the last census, some 600,000 same sex couples check the married box, but when the data was reported, they were deemed unmarried partners. Gay rights groups lobbied Congress to change that in the current census.

Maria Carter spoke with Edward San Filippo from the US Census bureau about the changes in 2010 Census.