future

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Jazz is all about creativity and freedom, but casual listeners can sometimes find deciphering it a chore. Today, we learn How to Listen to Jazz. Then, they say everything's up to date in Kansas City, but are we a "world class" locale? Finally, a winded Brian McTavish presents his Weekend To-Do List.

James Vaughan / Flickr - CC

It's a promise we've heard so many times before: Flying cars! Will a new plan from Uber finally get commuters off the ground? Then, we find out why Robert D. Kaplan expects more and more waves of refugees to sweep the globe.

The year is 2091 and you have a business trip to make to Kansas City. You wake up in the morning, ask the speaker in your wall for a car to be brought to your door to take you there. A car arrives, no driver, naturally, and you set up camp in the back seat with your laptop to prepare for a big meeting. The car, dodging traffic reported along Forest Park Parkway, hops onto I-70 and into a line of other driver-less cars along a solar-paneled highway.

Ronnie Burt's job, as president and CEO of Visit KC, is to make Kansas City appealing to people who don't live here. What are the selling points, and what holds us back?

Guest:

  • Ronnie Burt, president and CEO, Visit KC
Jake Joslyn for KCUR 89.3

In case you blinked, today is April 1, 2046.

The Royals opener is next week. The team is hoping to recreate that glorious season from 31 years ago. So here at KCUR 89.3, we’re looking back three decades to see how much has changed in Kansas City since the last time we were World Series champs.

The biggest turning point for our region happened on July 19, 2035, on Kaw Point Beach. Mayor Alex Gordon signed the Mo-Kan Unified Government charter, creating a single metropolitan area across state line.

In the Landry Park series for teen readers, local author Bethany Hagen pictures the year 2300. From class warfare to energy sustainability issues, it's a dark vision informed by the author's own experience growing up in Kansas City.

Guests:

  • Bethany Hagen, author, Landry Park and Jubilee Manor

We don't have flying cars, and futurists guess we never will. That's an infrastructure thing. On the other hand, leaps in communication technology have changed our lives in ways that surpass most of our wildest dreams. How does the 2015 we are living in compare to the 2015 visited by Marty McFly in Back to the Future Part II? Up next: Blade Runner, 2019.

Guests:

www.enchantedobjects.com

Traveling via teleportation. Umbrellas, trash cans, wallets, and cars that communicate with us. Pill bottles that pester us until we take our medication, and credit cards that monitor our exercise and reward us monetarily.

In this broadcast of Up to Date, we look at the impact of technology on things we use everyday. Steve Kraske explores the power and connectivity of these "enchanted objects" with entrepreneur and MIT instructor David Rose.

Guest:

A Professional Futurist Tells All

Jun 14, 2012

Borders Books. Blockbuster Home Movies. These companies share the same mistake; they missed a moment when they were challenged to adapt to a new business landscape. In their places stepped the Amazon Kindle, and Netflix respectively.

X-ray vision, doubled life spans, lots of robots, and zoos filled with animals that are now extinct.

It may sound like a science fiction novel from your childhood, but this is the not-too-distant future envisioned by quantum physicist Michio Kaku in his book Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100.