Fort Leavenworth

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio

If President Obama closes the Guantanamo Bay detention center in Cuba, the suspected terrorists who are housed there might be transferred to the military prison at Fort Leavenworth. Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback has spoken out against that idea. Thursday, he brought that message to Leavenworth and heard from the people who would be most directly affected: local residents.

John Stanton / Fort Wiki--CC

A major reduction in military force will have a small impact on two Kansas bases.

Though the U.S. Department of Defense is expected to cut some 40,000 positions, only 675 will be at Fort Leavenworth and Fort Riley.

John Armbrust with the Governor’s Military Council says although Fort Riley is losing 615 soldiers, or roughly 3 percent of the uniformed force, it shouldn’t have a noticeable economic impact in either Manhattan or Junction City.

Kansas officials have lobbied to keep troop levels steady at Fort Riley.

Private Bradley Manning, who was convicted of one of the largest security breaches in U.S. history, has been moved to the Army’s maximum security prison at Fort Leavenworth.   But, Manning wants to serve the time as a woman.

Manning has issued a statement, saying he'd like to be called Chelsea, and start hormone therapy, because he identifies as a female.  Jeff Wingo, a spokesman at Fort Leavenworth, says there’s only so much the Army can do.

After meetings at a prison at Fort Leavenworth, the lawyer for Army Staff Sergeant Robert Bales has said he expects charges could be filed tomorrow in the murder of 16 Afghanistan civilians during a rampage earlier this month.