floods

Katie Bernard / KCUR 89.3

Historic flooding on July 27 led to a dramatic water rescue at the popular Coach's Bar and Grill in south Kansas City. High water also caused major damage to businesses in the same strip near 103rd Street and Wornall Road.

Now, the properties' owners have decided "it is just not worth it" to restore the 103 Square complex. 

The City of Grandview

The Little Blue River is causing big problems for the City of Grandview — more than $1.3 million worth to be exact. 

Heavy rains caused major flooding across the metro Thursday, and Grandview officials say they may end up needing state or federal help to clean up the damage. 

"Unfortunately, we might get to the point where we might qualify for some state or federal assistance because there’s so much damage," Grandview Communications Manager Valarie Poindexter said. 

Sam Zeff / KCUR 89.3

This story was updated with additional information at 1:32 p.m. 

Heavy rains overnight caused severe flooding in parts of the Kansas City metropolitan area. 

In some areas of downtown, the rain at times fell at a rate of 2.5 inches per hour, according to the National Weather Service. Southern Cass County and parts of Lafayette County saw up to nine inches. 

Flooding was still widespread Thursday afternoon across the metro area, especially across portions of Wyandotte, Johnson and Jackson counties. 

Heavy rainfall and thunderstorms over the weekend caused record high flooding in southern Missouri, leading Governor Eric Greitens to declare a state of emergency.

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR 89.3

This spring, there's new life on the Missouri River - and it's more than buds on trees or fish in the water. 

Barge traffic may be on the verge of a renaissance.

At least that's the hope of Port KC, which reopened the Woodswether terminal in the West Bottoms last year. The facility, currently the only public port operating on the river, is receiving barges for the first time since 2007. 

As the nation looks back on the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which ravaged cities and communities along the Gulf Coast, we discuss how well the Kansas City area is prepared to deal with disasters of similar proportions — both natural and man-made.

Guests:

  • Chris Carroll is Emergency Planner for the city of Kansas City, Missouri.
  • Justin Sorg is the Planning and Exercise Program Manager for the Mid-America Regional Council.

In The Shoes Of Red Cross Volunteers

Jul 22, 2013
Steve Rhodes/Flickr-CC

We’ve all seen it on TV— a hurricane strikes, leaving thousands without power, food, or clean water for days or even weeks. When disasters happen, the Red Cross is the organization that always seems to be there.

Kenneth L. Kieser / Missouri's Great Flood of '93--Revisiting an Epic Natural Disaster

Twenty years ago this summer, monsoon-like rains, unseasonably heavy snowfall and unusual air pressure patterns combined to cause massive flooding across nine Midwestern states.

47 people died. Tens of thousands were forced from their homes, water inundated 75 towns and destroyed millions of acres of farmland. Damages were estimated at $20 billion dollars.

I covered the floods for NPR in 1993, and went back to revisit some of the people and places affected by what’s still called The Great Flood.

A powerful flood

The '93 Flood: Twenty Years Later

Jul 5, 2013
Kenneth L. Kieser / Missouri's Great Flood of '93-- Revisiting an Epic Natural Disaster

The Great Flood of 1993 absolutely battered the Midwest between April and October, with the peak occurring in July here in Kansas City.  Over 50 people lost their lives in incidence connected to the flooding over the summer of 1993.

Host Monrone Dodd talks with KCUR reporter Laura Ziegler, John Grothaus, Chief of Planning and Formulation for the Army Corps of Engineers; and Kenneth Kieser, author of Missouri's Great Flood of '93.

The motorized growl from an idling John Deere tractor drowned out the sounds of nature on a recent morning on Chris Webber’s central Missouri family farm.

As he checked the 40 acres of muddy field he wanted to plant that day, Webber worried about getting more rain, even as he worried about the lack of it.

“The drought is over at the moment,” he said, “but in Missouri, we tend to say that in 10 days or two weeks, we can be in a drought again. That’s how fast it can get back to dry.”

Steve Bell / KCUR

UPDATE 11:51 a.m. Storm Water Withdrawing:

The heavy rain and thunderstorms across the Kansas City area Friday are receding.

According to Chris Bowman, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Pleasant Hill, the main event appears to be over.

"It's just really kind of cleaning up from the morning's heavy rain," Bowman said.

Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

Floods leave mark on farmlands.  Kobach pushes for state lawmakers to finish redistricting.  KU Hospital restarts heart transplant program.  It’s a daily digest of headlines from KCUR.