family

A New York writer's journey home sheds light on family, keeping secrets, and the state of small-town Missouri. Plus, how one Missouri town might vote itself out of existence.

Jennifer Teege was strolling through her local library in Hamburg, Germany when she happened upon a book about the daughter of a brutal Nazi commandant—and recognized her mother's picture. Her life was turned upside down as she learned more about her infamous grandfather. It resulted in her recently released book, My Grandfather Would Have Shot Me: A Black Woman Discovers her Family’s Nazi Past.

"All happy families are alike. Each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way." So wrote Leo Tolstoy. Was he right, or are there shared characteristics that toxic families tend to have in common? A certain amount of shared sadness and conflict is inevitable; what differentiates a family that responds with closeness and trust from a family that cracks under pressure? Plus, strategies for mending toxic relationships or getting distance.

Guest:

  • Dacia Moore, licensed professional counselor
Rob Friesel / Flickr-CC

From serving stuffed celery sticks with cream cheese on the Thanksgiving table to participating in the Pilgrim Run every year or bringing kilts, scotch and good cheer to houses on New Year's Eve, family rituals take many different forms.

diy.storycorps.org/learn-more/

The holidays bring good food, lots of family, and fascinating tales. When families unite, storytelling takes center stage as we recall childhood memories and the ups and downs of life. On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with a personal historian and StoryCorps' David Isay about the process and significance of preserving family stories in preparation for the National Day of Listening

Guests:

Trevor / Flickr, Creative Commons

Expecting a new baby can force many parents to make complicated financial decisions. On Monday's Central Standard, we were joined by the Cash Money Crew to discuss how to approach and manage the monetary costs that come with a new child.

Guests:

Ken Wilcox / Flickr, Creative Commons

The bonds and battles between siblings are unique and long-lasting. For some people, their brother or sister is the most treasured person in their life; others can't spend an hour in the same room together. On Monday's Central Standard, we discuss the psychology of these lifelong relationships. 

Guest:

www.nationalpartnership.org

It's scary being a new parent, and many state regulations make the adjustment period very difficult for new moms and dads who have jobs. A recent study gives both Kansas and Missouri a failing grade in this area.

No one says that caring for a sick relative is easy, especially when Alzheimer’s disease is involved. However, the day to day struggles of caregivers are often lost in the shuffle. 

Family law can be a messy profession. Between acrimonious divorces and bitter custody battles, the terrain is often rocky and difficult to navigate.

In the first part of  Thursday's Up to Date, we talk with a lawyer who’s spent nearly 30 years balancing these types of battles. We’ll discuss how family lawyers stay detached from the raw emotions of their cases, why she sometimes feels like she’s a therapist for her clients, and why personal grievances should stay out of court—even in a divorce case.

PRI The World

Choosing to have a family and determining its size are highly personal, sometimes painful decisions that has consequences for your finances, health, and happiness. Up To Date is partnering with PRI’s The World for its series exploring family planning options from around the globe.

Imagine growing up in a pretty standard nuclear family. Then when you’re 15, your dad announces that he’s gay and that he and your mom are getting a divorce.

The holidays are a time of good cheer, celebration and togetherness. So what do you do if your family has just gone through a divorce or other domestic clash?

Imagine growing up in a pretty standard nuclear family. Then when you’re 15, your dad announces that he’s gay and that he and your mom are getting a divorce.

simpsoncrazy.com

So your kid went off to college, experienced freedom, set his own schedule, abided by his own rules, and now he’s home for winter break…for a few weeks.

Yeah, there’s gonna be some tension.  We've seen it play out in movies and TV shows that poke fun at family dysfunction around the holidays.

Parenting

Dec 5, 2011
Flickr/Daquella manera

Can you ever love your child too much? Today on the show, join Dr. Bruce Liese for a look at what happens when parents are too attuned to their children, and how our culture’s obsession with happiness can lead our children towards an unhappy adulthood.

GUEST:
Dr. Bruce Liese, University of Kansas School of Medicine