exercise

WATCH: Johnson County Seniors Drum To A Beat To 'Stay Alive'

May 7, 2015
Bridgit Bowden / KCPT

For senior citizens, a good way to get exercise is through group fitness classes like Drums Alive at the Matt Ross Community Center in Overland Park, Kansas.

Debbie Shearer teaches the class. She says introducing exercise into senior citizens’ routines is “part of staying alive.”

“If you don’t use it, you are going to lose the ability, and you are going to become deconditioned,” Shearer says. “And when you become deconditioned, then you start falling, you start having accidents, then you lose your independence.”

Creative Commons, Wikimedia

The first marathon-runner was a Greek messenger who ran 26 miles to announce a Greek victory in the Trojan War before dropping dead in his tracks. A cardiologist living in Kansas City has amassed research and data suggesting there might have been a reason for that. Extreme cardiovascular activity for prolonged periods of time done rigorously and continuously over a lifetime doesn't correlate with a long lifespan, he says. And the heart has a lot to do with that.

Guest:

Unified Government of Wyandotte County/Kansas City, Kan.

Kansas City, Kan., Mayor Mark Holland on Thursday unveiled an initiative to ensure that all residents can use a proposed new community center regardless of their financial circumstances.

Holland announced the initiative as part of a community forum for a “healthy campus” proposed for an urban site just west of downtown Kansas City, Kan.

A proposal championed by Holland, the healthy campus is a proposed mixed-use development that would revolve around Big Eleven Lake, which is bounded by 10th and 11th streets between State Avenue and Washington Boulevard.

Obesity, diabetes, heart disease — these health issues aren’t really the problem in America, according to Mark Fenton, who spoke Wednesday at the third annual Kansas Obesity Summit. Rather, he said, the real culprits are poor nutrition and physical inactivity.

A legislative conference committee is working to reconcile differing tax bills that passed the Kansas House and Senate. In the first round of negotiations Wednesday, House leaders suggested eliminating a proposed tax break for health clubs.

The measure would exempt health clubs from property taxes because some club owners say they face unfair competition from YMCAs, which are tax exempt nonprofit organizations.

Rep. Richard Carlson, a St. Marys Republican, is concerned that giving health clubs a tax break could lead to other businesses asking for a similar tax cut.

One doctor says he has the ultimate cure-all— and it’s not from a pharmacy.

On Tuesday's Up to Date, we examine the “exercise cure” and how it seems to decrease disease and improve general health.

Guest:

Halfway through January, and it's a time for a serious question. Are you going to bear down and get started on that new year’s commitment to regular exercise and healthy eating? Or are you going to let this year's goal lapse and be forgotten?

On Tuesday's Central Standard, Brian Ellison talks with an exercise scientist and a behavior modification expert helps us understand how we can change those habits and why we usually don’t. You can learn why for so many of us, the resolutions are already over.

Guests:

Missouri could soon have an official state exercise. Backers of a bill in the Missouri House say an official exercise could help keep kids active and fight childhood obesity.

Kansas City, MO – Reverend Eric Williams of Calvary Temple Baptist Church in midtown has worked for a long time on health issues in the African American community. A few years ago, he says he was tired of seeing people suffering and dying from health problems related to obesity and lack of exercise. So his church formed a non-profit and eventually built a gym right next door. The Calvary Community Wellness Center opened in 2008.