DNA

She survived a person's worst nightmare. KCUR's investigative team brings us the story of how one woman’s vicious attacker was finally found after 17 years, and of the mistake that left the case open for so long.

Guests:

Illustration by Jacob Joslyn

Juliette was startled awake on August 17, 1999, and faced a woman’s worst nightmare: a man was in her bedroom, brandishing a large knife.

“He said, ‘Be quiet and I won’t hurt you,’” says Juliette (a pseudonym). “I thought that meant he was going to rape me and leave.”

Forget what you've seen on CSI or Law and Order.  Take a look at what really goes into solving crimes through DNA analysis and how the process differs from what we see on TV.

Guest:

Painstaking and coordinated detective work, between Kansas City and Colorado, have resulted in a charge in the attack on a Kansas City woman 14 and a half years ago.

Kansas City, Mo. – Modern DNA technology was unheard of in the 1970s as police in two Missouri cities struggled to find and stop a man who was attacking women. KCUR news has learned it was a mainstay of crime detection that led investigators in one town to help counterparts in the other. The common denominator is the man now charged in 1980s attacks around Kansas City's Waldo District.

Bernard Jackson stands charged in Kansas City with four rapes committed in 1983 and 1984. They are accusations, not convictions.