Divorce | KCUR

Divorce

Segment 1: How will Kansas' move towards a 50/50 custody baseline affect families?

Kansas has been debating changing the default in children custody in divorce. Today, we explore the complicated reality of what the best interest of a child is when it comes to custody.

Screengrab / Kansas Department for Children and Families

Kansas is looking to prod parents to catch up on their child support, arguing that doing so could chip away at the the cost of welfare.

The Department for Children and Families website launched a child support evaders Web page Wednesday that features pictures of 10 delinquent parents. It includes notes on what they owe, where they were last seen, and a link to report their whereabouts.

Gov. Jeff Colyer said delinquent parents shift child support costs on to taxpayers.

file photo / Kansas News Service

A push to make more divorcing Kansas parents split custody evenly could, some critics contend, make the break-ups harder for children. What’s more, they worry a shift to a 50/50 custody standard could prevent a spouse’s escape from an abusive relationship.

A bill creating a new equal custody standard would significantly raise the standard needed for a judge to give one parent more time with the children than the other.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

The Kansas City Star published on Sunday a long list of ways the state government in Topeka resists efforts to disclose information to the public. Today, we discuss The Star's assertions with reporters who broke the story and former state Rep. John Rubin, who tried to fix the problem from inside the Statehouse. Then, among other post-holiday events is an increase in the number of separations and divorces.

David Slusky and Donna Ginther

The Affordable Care Act has been credited – and blamed – for lots of things, but lowering the divorce rate generally hasn’t been one of them.

Not until now, anyway. A paper co-authored by two KU economists suggests that states that expanded Medicaid saw fewer so-called medical divorces than states, like Kansas and Missouri, that didn’t expand Medicaid.

How so?

Used to be Medicaid had an asset limit. The program’s income eligibility requirements limited the maximum amount of assets and income individuals could possess.

Nokdie / Flickr - CC

At the beginning of most marriages, divorce is likely the last thing on the bride and groom's minds. Unfortunately, with divorce rates hovering around 40 percent, a separation is something a lot of couples will have to navigate at one point or another.

Sole custody of children became the court's model when divorce became frequent in the 60s and 70s. In recent years, however, co-parenting has made headway as an alternative to the current model.

Guests:

  • Tiffany D. Taylor is a Kansas City, Kansas resident and author of the children’s book, 2 Halves Make Me Whole which tells her own co-parenting story through the lens of her young son
  • Dr. Ned Holstein is the founder and chairman of the National Parents Organization.

A bill being heard this week by a Missouri legislative committee promotes shared parenting – a flexible arrangement in which children spend as close to equal time as possible with each parent after separation or divorce.

The legislation proposes adding language to the state’s child custody law to emphasize that the best interest of the child is equal access to both parents – a change that would encourage judges to pay more attention to research on the best interest of children.

Parents, Teens & Divorce

Oct 13, 2013
Free Grunge Textures/Flickr-CC

Divorce presents difficult situations for any family, but it can be especially disruptive to teenagers. Just how much it affects them depends on how parents shape the situation.

On Monday's Up to Date, psychologist Wes Crenshaw joins us with a few teen guests to talk about what it’s like to be caught in the middle, what parents can do to make the transition easier and what factors mark the difference between a clean break and a chaotic split.

Guests:

SteadyHealth.com

Even with rates falling, divorce is still a common occurrence in the United States, yet have we gotten any better at putting ourselves, and our children, through the process?

Financial Advice: Marriage

Jun 25, 2012
Auzigog / Flickr

First comes love, then comes marriage – but when comes that first conversation about your finances? In this Monday's Central Standard, professional Financial Advisors stop by with advice for advice for newlyweds hoping to create a solid financial foundation to their marriage, and then, what to do if things don't go as planned.

First comes love, then comes marriage…then for about 50 percent of us … it’s divorce.