disaster relief

courtesy: Heart to Heart International

Puerto Rico is still digging out from Hurricane Maria.

The storm knocked out power, and fuel supplies are low. People are struggling to meet basic needs, such as access to food and water.

"We bring hope to people. We're going to help make those circumstances better," said Heart to Heart International chief operating officer Kim Carroll. "Puerto Rico will recover if we help it, and that's what we need to do." 

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Today, two Kansas City DREAMers talk about the challenges they face as Trump’s DACA deadline approaches. Also, Hurricanes Irma and Maria have wreaked havoc upon Florida and Puerto Rico. We’ll speak with KCUR's Frank Morris, who's covering the destruction, and an area relief agent working to help victims piece their lives back together.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Emergency preparedness is in the national consciousness in a big way. Today, the Smart Money Experts make a special trip to the studio to discuss preparing your family's finances for the wide-ranging effects of a natural disaster. Then, Kansas City voters in April approved a one-eighth-cent sales tax increase aimed at developing the long-neglected east side of town.

The Kauffman Foundation has released a list identifying 222 people who they consider the real leaders of Kansas City. And, for the most part, these leaders aren't the mayor or the chief of police ... So who are they?

Plus, recent hurricanes and earthquakes in Puerto Rico and Mexico have many wondering what to do, perhaps especially those who hail from those regions. What it's like to wait for information, and attempt to help from afar.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Recent controversy surrounding the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity has put Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach in the nation's limelight. Today, we get an update on the 4-month-old committee.

Missouri Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal and Rep. Warren Love made news last month doing something that seems antithetical to their positions in government; hoping in Facebook posts for political violence.

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

“I love the chainsaw guys,” Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon interrupts.

Dwain Carter, director of disaster relief for the Missouri Baptists, is trying to tell the group what his organization does in the aftermath of a tornado. Often tree limbs and wooden structures need to be removed by chainsaw crews. But Carter lets the governor continue.

Update 11:35 a.m. Friday.

Atchison officials have issued the all clear, saying it's safe to go outside after a chemical cloud enveloped the city this morning.

Atchison City Manager Trey Cocking says at 8:02 a.m. Monday two chemicals were "inadvertently mixed" at the MGP Ingredients plant causing a gaseous plume. 

Cocking says HAZMAT protocols were immediately followed. "They put a foam substance on it to treat it, and that's what they've been doing to mitigate it," Cocking says.

When you think of earthquakes, you think of California and Japan, but not usually southeast Missouri. As the most seismically active region of the country this side of the Rockies, maybe that should change. Experts say a big tremor's only a matter of time, and Kansas City needs to be ready with a helping hand when the shake-up happens.

Guests:

  • Mike Curry is the Jackson County emergency manager.
  • Jeff Fox is a reporter and business editor at The Examiner.

The rebuilding of Joplin after a devastating tornado struck in 2011 was generally applauded as a textbook example of how to take care of people when disaster hits. However, homeowners and businesses on the East Coast are still struggling in the aftermath of 2012's Hurricane Sandy. 

Guests:

HHI

A three-member team from Lenexa-based medical nonprofit Heart to Heart International arrived in Ecuador Sunday night, less than 24 hours after a 7.8-magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of the Central American nation.

As of Monday morning, international news organizations were reporting at least 272 people had died and more than 2,500 had been injured. 

 A young couple living in New Orleans are expecting a baby any day when Hurricane Katrina separates them. That’s the premise of Gumbo House, a new play debuting at the Metropolitan Ensemble Theater.

Guest:

As the nation looks back on the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which ravaged cities and communities along the Gulf Coast, we discuss how well the Kansas City area is prepared to deal with disasters of similar proportions — both natural and man-made.

Guests:

  • Chris Carroll is Emergency Planner for the city of Kansas City, Missouri.
  • Justin Sorg is the Planning and Exercise Program Manager for the Mid-America Regional Council.

Cody Newill / KCUR

Dozens of volunteers from across the Kansas City metro gathered at the Church of the Resurrection in Leawood, Kan., Saturday as part of a disaster simulation.

Dan Verbeck / KCUR

Kansas City won’t be getting the volume of federal funding it’s been accustomed to  for preparation against terrorist attacks and natural disasters, said Sen. Claire McCaskill, meeting with Kansas City reporters.

The Senator said the mood toward smaller government will work against paying for disaster aid the way it has been since Sept. 11.

Kansas City has been excluded from a list of to 25 cities to get  public safety and disaster aid. 

McCaskill doubts funding will return for what many consider municipal responsibilities.

Heart to Heart International

A group of doctors from Olathe-based relief agency Heart to Heart International is in the hardest hit areas of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines this week. 

Founder Dr. Gary Morsch, Kansas City family practice physician Dr. Rick Randolph, and nurse Susan Mangicaro began on the island of Ormoc, administering tetanus shots and antibiotics due to secondary infections. 

"There is so much debris, (like) rusted tin, that infection secondary to cuts and wound punctures can be septic and deadly within a few weeks," Mangicaro said.

In The Shoes Of Red Cross Volunteers

Jul 22, 2013
Steve Rhodes/Flickr-CC

We’ve all seen it on TV— a hurricane strikes, leaving thousands without power, food, or clean water for days or even weeks. When disasters happen, the Red Cross is the organization that always seems to be there.