Cyber Security

Dan Hesse on Up To Date
Brian Ellison / KCUR 89.3

Dan Hesse retired after seven years as CEO of Sprint in August 2014, he vowed to take at least a year "completely off."

The year has come and gone — and Hesse is busy again ... but it's a different kind of busy.

"I'd been accused by many people of being a serial workaholic," Hesse says. "I tried to have a balanced life, but I really focused on being the best leader and mentor I could be. I wanted to take some time to be the best father, husband, son and friend that I could be."

The University of Kansas is taking a bold step into the fight against cybercrime. It recently announced a $4.7 million, five-year grant from the National Science Foundation to train a new generation of cyberdefense experts who will be dedicated to public service.

Guest:

  • Bo Luo is an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science at KU and the program leader of CyberCorps.

Imagine a blackout that lasts not days, but weeks or months. Veteran investigative reporter Ted Koppel discusses the life-threatening possibility of an attack on our power grid and how unprepared our government is for such a disaster.

Ted Koppel will be in Kansas City to discuss his new book, 'Lights Out: A Cyberattack, a Nation Unprepared, Surviving the Aftermath' at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, November 11 at Unity Temple on the Plaza. For admission information, visit www.rainydaybooks.com.

Missouri Auditor's Office

The social security numbers and other personal information of almost 1.5 million current and former Missouri public school students are in jeopardy, according to a state audit released Wednesday.

Hacked

Jul 30, 2015

In light of the data breach that has compromised thousands of Kansans' health records, we discuss how individuals and businesses can protect personal information from being hacked. 

Guests:

  • Dustin Jacobsen is the chief strategy officer for Flat Square Technology Group, Inc.
  • Brandon Holley is the business development manager for Network Technologies Inc.

Thousands of Kansans soon will be receiving letters notifying them that their electronic health records may have been compromised.

The letters are from a Fort Wayne, Ind., company that provides an online patient portal called NoMoreClipboard used by 18 Kansas hospitals and at least half a dozen clinics. Most are small-town hospitals in western and southeastern Kansas. The largest is in Hutchinson.

KHI News Service file photo

Paul Davis, a Lawrence attorney and former Democratic state representative who ran unsuccessfully for governor of Kansas last year, is leading a class action lawsuit against one of the three health insurance companies that administer Kansas Medicaid.

Davis’ firm, Fagan Emert & Davis, is seeking plaintiffs from the pool of Medicaid recipients whose care is coordinated by Amerigroup, one of three companies that received state contracts to run Medicaid through the state’s KanCare managed care program.

When it comes to internet crime, criminals are far ahead of law enforcement and the general public. As more and more hacks make headlines, we talk about our vulnerability as individuals and how to protect ourselves from a cyber attack.

File photo

More than 389,000 Kansans and nearly 2 million Missourians were affected by last month’s massive cyberattack on Anthem Inc., the nation’s second largest health insurer, figures released by the company show.

“This data breach is so far-reaching that it impacts nearly one-third of our state’s population,” Missouri Department of Insurance Director John M. Huff said in a statement Monday.

Wikipedia Commons

The NSA’s monitoring programs are no secret anymore. But assuming you’re not someone with nefarious plans for national security, what does that mean for  online privacy?

In the first part of Thursday's Up to Date, we talk cybersecurity with expert David Fidler about how governments are responding, the long-term fallout from the Snowden case, and how far the U.S. needs to go when it comes to ferreting out the terrorists among us.

Computer Guys: Cyber Security

Feb 13, 2012

In Russia, a worm called Koobface wiggled away with millions of dollars using social networks like Facebook.

Computer Guys: The True Cost of a Computer Virus

Aug 15, 2011
stuartpilbrow / Flickr

Today on the show, we ask the Computer Guys to tell us everything they know about how we can protect ourselves from a computer virus, and exactly how much that should cost. Is free antivirus software more expensive than the paid version? Where can you get a reliable rating of the various anti-virus products, and what devices need protecting? Is there an anti-virus pill you can take?