Community

Community
8:15 am
Wed February 5, 2014

Johnson County Salvation Army Opens New Homeless Shelter

Credit Photo Credit Creative Commons

The Salvation Army of Johnson County has expanded and improved its facilities for the homeless. Their existing shelter is 60-years-old and does not meet the needs of the county, which is the fastest growing county in Kansas.

The chapter's Major Mark Martsolf says the county wanted to provide a more dignified environment while the growing number of homeless families are trying to get back on their feet. He says the new Olathe facility will upgrade broken amenities and fixtures, as well as add square footage.

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Up to Date
10:02 am
Tue February 4, 2014

An African-American Veteran Reflects On Coming Out

Rob Smith is the author of Closets, Combat and Coming Out: Coming of Age as a Gay Man in the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" Army.

It's not easy to come out of the closet, but imagine doing that when you're in the Army.

On Tuesday's Up to Date, we talk with an African-American veteran about the challenges he faced and the added difficulties of navigating the now-defunct Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell policy.

Guest: 

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People
9:51 am
Mon January 27, 2014

Legendary Kansas City Radio Man Dan Verbeck To Retire

Dan Verbeck (right) with KCUR news director, Frank Morris.
Credit Laura Spencer / KCUR

Veteran Kansas City radio newsman, Dan Verbeck announced his retirement Monday. Verbeck has been a reporter in the Kansas City region for 40 years. Since 2008, Verbeck has served as a general assignment reporter at KCUR.

Previously, Verbeck worked at KMBZ 980 AM for 23 years, where he was well known for his signature signoff: "Cruiser 980 ... clear."

"I have always admired Dan as a hard-boiled radio newsman who has a poetic and empathetic approach to the people in his stories," said KCUR News Director, Frank Morris.

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Central Standard
8:55 am
Mon January 27, 2014

Redefining Marriage In The 21st Century

Today we are talking about tying the knot. How has marriage changed over the past 250 years?

Guests:   

  • Jennifer Frangos​, professor of English at UMKC
  • Jennifer Phegley, professor of English at UMKC
  • Jessica Halliday Hardie, professor of Sociology at UMKC
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Cops & Crime
5:36 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Suspect In University Arsons Will Go To Prison

A man from Columbia, Mo., is going to federal prison for six and a half years for setting fires at University of Missouri’s main library and at Stephens College.

The penalty includes $600,000 in restitution.

At least seven fires were set in Ellis Library in September 2011. Computers and security cameras and windows were shattered with a pipe. Damage and cleanup was worth roughly $1.5 million.

Christopher Curtis Kelley, 27, also damaged the repository of Missouri State Historical Society housed in the same building.

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People
10:29 am
Thu January 23, 2014

Kansas City Sudanese Man Narrowly Makes It Out Of Sudan

Manon Bol, a Sudanese refugee living in Kansas City, hopes to save enough money to bring his family here.
Credit Laura Ziegler / KCUR

Thousands of miles from renewed violence in South Sudan, Sudanese residents of Kansas City are trying stay on top of the rapidly changing news from their homeland and learn what they can about family and friends.

Kansas City has one of the largest Sudanese communities in the country, mainly refugees from decades of brutal civil war. It was almost incomprehensible when fighting broke out over a political dispute among differing tribes in the new Southern Sudanese capital of Juba last month.

Reunited For The First Time

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KC Currents
7:13 pm
Thu January 16, 2014

Kansas City Dialect, Labeling Sustainable Foods, Quindaro Quilts

A quilt by Nedra Bonds at UMKC Miller Nichols Library.
Credit Laura Spencer / KCUR

What Does The Kansas City Dialect Sound Like?

There is a general myth that Midwesterners, or even Kansas Citians specifically, speak without an accent. But that is not the case. Linguistic distinctions in Midland speech exist, and have been changing, perhaps without us even noticing, over the past 50 years.

TALK: Understanding Regional Accents

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Tell KCUR
4:24 pm
Thu January 16, 2014

You Came To Kansas City For A Job, But You Stayed For Love

Kansas City's attractions include low cost of living, jobs and love, according to social media feedback we received this week.
Credit Lasse Fuss / WikiCommons

You like Kansas City’s cost of living.

And many of you came to enjoy the arts and entrepreneurship scenes after relocating here for a job.

But when we took to social media and asked you what brought you to Kansas City and why you stayed, we were inundated with love stories that led to KC roots.

Such was the case for Dave Shuck, who moved to Kansas City in 2002 from San Jose, Calif., after tracking down a former friend from high school.

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KC Currents
10:01 am
Thu January 16, 2014

Do Kansas Citians Talk Funny?

Credit DavidGoehring / Flickr -- Creative Commons

Is there such a thing as a Kansas City accent or dialect? Researchers at the University of Missouri are looking into it.

Whether you’re from here, or relocated from somewhere else, are there things you notice that only people from here seem to say?

On KCUR's news program KC Currents, we explore these questions and other research being conducted on regional accents.

GUESTS:

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Community
8:03 pm
Wed January 15, 2014

What Does The Kansas City Dialect Sound Like?

This illustration of popular terms for soda beverages shows a vast difference right inside the state of Missouri.
Credit Joshua Katz / NC State University

There is a general myth that Midwesterners, or even Kansas Citians specifically, speak without an accent. But that is not the case. Linguistic distinctions in Midland speech exist, and have been changing, perhaps without us even noticing, over the past 50 years.

Kansas City is in the Midland speech region. It spans from Ohio through Indiana, Illinois and Missouri, then parts of Iowa, Kansas, and Nebraska. It excludes the St. Louis corridor.

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Cops & Crime
4:03 pm
Wed January 15, 2014

Platte County Boutique Drug Death Sparks Call For Law Change

Platte County Sheriff Mark Owen calls for loophole changes in Missouri synthetic street drug laws.
Credit Dan Verbeck / KCUR

The Platte County Sheriff, Prosecutor and Social Service Agencies hope a change in Missouri law will give teeth to fighting potentially deadly synthetic street drugs.  

The recommendation comes after a charge was filed in connection with the death of a Northland teenager.

The manslaughter charge against 17-year-old Krista Meeks of Riverside contends she knew the synthetic LSD she allegedly sold a 15-year-old boy and a younger friend could kill and that other drugs like it had killed in the past.

The older boy died in October, his friend lived.

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Linguistics
3:34 pm
Wed January 15, 2014

Do You Have An Accent? Take The Minimal Pairs Test

This is a minimal pairs test used by Christopher Strelluf, a graduate student at the University of Missouri, who is studying how people in Kansas City talk.

This is a list of words that have one phonological difference. Some of the pairs are controls, as in they're pronounced the same.

Read the list aloud to see where you make distinctly different pronunciations, and where you might be merged. You might be surprised to find that some of words that you think you say very differently don't come out so distinctly after all.

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Tell KCUR
9:50 am
Tue January 14, 2014

Tell KCUR: What Brought You To Kansas City?

Credit KCUR

The Great Plains has been among the fastest growing  regions in the country over the past decade.

A dynamic economy and a low cost of living has bolstered the population by 14 percent in the past 10 years, Forbes reports.

Metro Kansas City mirrors that trend.

KCUR wants to know: what brought you to Kansas City and why did you stay?

Leave us a voicemail at 816-235-2881.

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Central Standard
4:00 pm
Mon January 13, 2014

Nature In The City: Winter 2014

Scott tweeted us, "Here's a Red tailed hawk eating a Junco he took from my feeder."
Credit Scott G (gipsonwonds) / Twitter

It's winter, and with shorter days, bone-chilling temperatures and snow and ice, we typically stay indoors.

Many forgo their daily walk in with nature. And most of us figure that there’s not much nature to see anyway.

But what are we missing?

As it turns out, we are missing a whole lot. It’s that time again for Nature in the City, a quarterly look at the plants and animals in and around the metro.

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Up to Date
12:32 pm
Fri January 10, 2014

Repairing The Economy With City Policies

Bruce Katz is the co-author of 'The Metropolitan Revolution: How Cities Are Fixing Our Broken Politics and Fragile Economy.'

The economy has been in trouble for a while — that's no secret. But a new idea about the "metropolitan revolutions" proposes investments in things like infrastructure and manufacturing on a city level.

In the first part of Monday's Up to Date, we talk about the implications of this philosophy and where it could lead.

Guest:

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Community
8:49 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Lawrence Celebrates Beat Generation Icon William S. Burroughs At 100

Jon Blumb, Recording Session for a Music Video, September 25, 1992, gelatin silver print.
Courtesy of the Spencer Museum of Art

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of William S. Burroughs, who was born in St. Louis, Mo., in 1914. A writer, painter, and spoken word artist, Burroughs is considered one of the seminal members of the Beat Generation. He spent his final years living in Lawrence, Kan.

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Up to Date
12:02 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

From the City To The Country: Cindy Hoedel's New Flint Hills Home

The slower pace of the Flint Hills is a far cry from the speed of the city.
Credit thisisfrommarty / CC-Flickr

Fresh steel-cut oats, dozens of Goldfinches swarming a bird feeder, and charmingly eccentric neighbors are just some of the rustic features of Kansas' Flint Hills.

In the second part of Thursday's Up to Date, we sit down with Kansas City Star writer and columnist Cindy Hoedel to check in on her transition from the big city to the Flint Hills. 

Guest:

  • Cindy Hoedel is a Kansas City Star writer and lifestyle columnist. 
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Maryville Rape Case
11:47 am
Thu January 9, 2014

No Sexual Assault Charges In Maryville Rape Case

Daisy Coleman, now 16, in front of her many awards and trophies for cheerleading, dance and beauty pageants. (Peggy Lowe/KCUR)

A 19-year-0ld Maryville man pleaded guilty Thursday to a misdemeanor count of child endangerment, dodging a rape charge and offering an apology in a case that attracted small-town acrimony and international attention.

Matthew Barnett, who appeared at the Nodaway County Courthouse with his parents, got a four month suspended sentence, two years probation, and was ordered to make $1,800 in restitution to his victim, Daisy Coleman, now 16.

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People
10:21 am
Thu January 9, 2014

The Life And Work Of Kansas City Civil Rights Activist, Alvin Sykes

Alvin Sykes will speak at the Kansas City Public Library later this month about his life and work.
Credit Laura Ziegler / KCUR

Kansas City native Alvin Sykes is a self-taught civil rights activist who has done instrumental work with the justice system, particularly with unsolved civil rights crimes, including the high-profile murder of Emmett Till, and the 1980 murder of Kansas City musician Steve Harvey.

This month he is giving a talk at the Kansas City Public library, where he was the 2013 scholar in residence. Sykes educated himself in law and civil rights using resources from the city's public library system.

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Maryville Rape Case
5:06 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Going Public in the Maryville Rape Case To Spur Action

Paige Parkhurst, 15, seen here at her Albany, Mo., home, went public as a rape victim because she hoped it would spur authorities to look more seriously at the Maryville case. (Peggy Lowe/KCUR)

On a quiet Sunday morning last fall, Paige Parkhurst remembers being awakened by her mother, who was crying.

A newspaper story about the night two years ago that Paige was assaulted and her friend Daisy Coleman was allegedly raped was going viral. She and her mother, Robin Bourland, talked about how they had already been through so much. The minor boy who admitted to having sex with Parkhurst had been convicted and sentenced through the juvenile justice system.

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Up to Date
3:05 pm
Wed January 8, 2014

90-Mile View: Freezing Temperatures Stop Trains In Their Tracks

Amtrak trains have been struggling with the bitter cold that has swept across most of the United States.
Credit Jim Ramnes / CC-Flickr

An Amtrak train carrying more than 200 people arrived in Chicago early Monday morning, Jan. 6, after the bitterly cold weather stopped it for more than eight hours. 

In the latest edition of 90-Mile View, Amtrak engineer and conductor Eric Peterson talks with Up to Date host Steve Kraske about the effects of the recent country-wide deep-freeze on railroad operations. Peterson has previously appeared on the program to share his love of trains and tales from the tracks.

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Maryville Rape Case
2:03 pm
Wed January 8, 2014

Maryville Rape Decision Set for Thursday

A decision will be announced Thursday at the Nodaway County Courthouse in Maryville, Mo., on a controversial rape case.
Credit Peggy Lowe / KCUR

A highly-anticipated decision is expected Thursday on a controversial rape case in Maryville, Mo.

Jackson County Prosecutor Jean Peters Baker announced Wednesday, two years to the day of the alleged assault, that she will announce the findings of her investigation in Maryville at 1:30 p.m.

Baker has not made any indication what her decision might be. She could refile charges against two boys that were dropped earlier, refuse to file any charges, or choose other legal claims.

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Up to Date
11:04 am
Wed January 8, 2014

Finding The Funny Side Of Marriage

Cindy Chupak is the author of 'The Longest Date: Life as a Wife.'

When it comes to marriage, there are always some unforeseen curves in the road.

In the first part of Wednesday's Up to Date, we talk with Sex and the City screenwriter Cindy Chupack about how she turned her own bumpy road into a series of comedic episodes in her new book, The Longest Date: Life as a Wife.

Guest:

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Community
11:02 am
Wed January 8, 2014

KCPT's 'The Bridge' Brings More Local Music To Kansas City Airwaves

Credit 90.9 The Bridge

A new Kansas City noncommercial radio station that features local music officially launched this week.

Kansas City's public television station, KCPT, bought KTGB "The Bridge" last May, and ownership was officially transferred last month.

After KCPT's purchase, studios for The Bridge were moved to the KCPT headquarters in Kansas City, Mo. Previously, they were housed in Warrensburg, Mo., where the station was owned and operated by the University of Central Missouri.

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Up to Date
11:18 am
Tue January 7, 2014

Western Kansas Drought Effects Reach Across State

The droughts of western Kansas could affect the water supply in Kansas City.
Credit Kansas Poetry / Flickr-CC

You've heard about how farmers in western Kansas have faced drought problems, but you might not know that the drought can affect the water supply here in Kansas City.

In the second part of Tuesday's Up to Date, we take a look at the drought's far-reaching effects and what actions could fix the problem.

Guest:

  • Josh Swatty, vice president of the Land Institute
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People
6:26 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Tell KCUR: Have You Applied For A Concealed Carry Permit?

Follow Tell KCUR responses with the #TellKCUR hashtag on Twitter.
Credit KCUR

Record numbers of people have applied for concealed carry handgun permits in Kansas.

More than 24,000 applied in 2013, exceeding the previous year’s applications by 50 percent.

We want to know if you were part of that number.

Tell KCUR: Did you apply for a permit to carry a concealed gun in 2013? Why or Why not?

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Central Standard
4:19 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

You're So Vain, You Probably Think This Article Is About You

Credit Aveda Corporation / Flickr - CC

Thousands of us make New Year's resolutions. When the clock marks the start of a new year, it's also a new opportunity for self-improvement. However, many of these resolutions will fall into the trap of being more about the "self" part rather than the "improvement" part.

On Monday's Central Standard, host Bill Anderson and psychologist Bruce Liese observe aspects of vanity and help tweak your New Year's resolutions so they are less about physical appearance and more about giving back to family, friends and community.

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People
4:01 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Remembering R. Crosby Kemper Jr., Icon Of Kansas City

The Kemper family supported farming and agriculture, most notably through the support of the American Royal.
Credit Courtesy / The Kemper family

R. Crosby Kemper Jr., banker, philanthropist, and giant of Kansas City civic life, died last week at his friend's home in Indian Wells, Calif. He was 86.

Kemper was born in 1927 in Kansas City, the only son of R. Crosby Kemper Sr. and Enid Jackson Kemper.

Throughout his active life, many of his preoccupations reflected his family's legacy  — a long line of Kansas City aristocrats and leaders involved in banking, agriculture and politics. 

A banker's life

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Cops & Crime
7:47 am
Fri January 3, 2014

Metro Drivers In Kansas Claim Legal Exceptions To Texting Law

Police and highway patrol on the Kansas side of metro Kansas City are finding it hard to enforce laws against texting while driving. Loopholes allow it to go on, relatively unchecked as numbers bear out.

Kansas law is pretty clear, stating you can’t drive on road or highway “while using a wireless communications device to write, send or read a written communication.”

Yet, the Johnson County Sheriff's office only issued 17 tickets  for testing while driving in 2012. Overland Park Police wrote 45 tickets for the offense in 2011 and 40 in 2012.  

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KC Currents
5:06 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

KC Food Hubs, Missouri Executions, Mariachi Pioneer Dies

Credit Courtesy of Mariachi Estrella

Food Hubs Try To Grow Local Farms

Restaurants across the country have jumped on the local food bandwagon. They’re trying to source more of their produce from nearby farms, but it's not easy. As a potential solution, “food hubs” are popping up across the country. These food processing and distribution centers make it easier for restaurants, grocery stores and others to buy local food.

A Look At The Food Hub Trend In Kansas City

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