college

Colleges are attracting more students than ever before. And when they get there from rural or urban settings, from diverse backgrounds, they have to figure out — some for the first time — how to deal with difference.

Guests:

On this edition of Up To Date, the Ethics Professors take on the recent outcry involving athletes Ryan Lochte and Colin Kaepernick, and look at the University of Chicago's refusal to create safe spaces on campus.

Guests:

  • Wayne Vaught is dean of the UMKC College of Arts and Sciences and a professor of philosophy, medicine and bioethics.
  • Clancy Martin is a professor of philosophy at UMKC and a professor of business ethics at the Bloch School of Management. 
Flickr/Adam_Procter400

Missouri has been crowing about how the state has kept down tuition increases for undergraduate, in-state students. In April, Gov. Jay Nixon came to UMKC to sign a budget that he said keeps college affordable in Missouri and "within reach for more families."

Turns out, college costs in Missouri are more expensive than advertised, according to a report released Tuesday by  Missouri State Auditor Nicole Galloway.

Facing The Hookup Culture At College

Jul 18, 2016

The first year at college opens the door to a new life away from parental supervision.  As social life on college campus gravitates toward casual sex, we look at what students should consider before joining the hookup culture.

Guests:

  • Wes Crenshaw is board certified in couples and family psychology. He writes the Double Take column for the Lawrence Journal World.
  • Sarah Lieberman, originally from Lawrence, Kansas, is a sophomore at Cornell University. 
Miguel Calderon / courtesy University Daily Kansan

In July 2017, a Kansas law that permits concealed carry in state hospitals and universities takes effect. We explore the idea of safety in places of healing and learning.

Guests:

  • Reinheld Janzen, Professor Emerita of Art History at Washburn University
  • Miguel Calderon, recent KU graduate

The University of Missouri is now projecting a drop in enrollment of 2,630 students for the next school year, which will contribute to a $31.4 million revenue shortfall for MU next year.

University of Missouri leaders briefed faculty and staff Wednesday with the latest figures on enrollment and the budget for the next fiscal year. Vice Chancellor of Finance Rhonda Gibler explained the cuts necessary to right the ship at MU will not be easy.

Some middle-skill jobs in America, which can provide good pay, remain unfilled because job seekers don't have the necessary training. Meanwhile, many people struggle to find promising job opportunities. Today's guests think programs offering technical and vocational education can help bridge that gap.

Guests:

Kyle Palmer / KCUR 89.3

The wall outside the college counseling classroom at Kansas City's University Academy is adorned with dozens of college acceptance letters. Several of them are addressed to Jazmyne Smith. 

"Well, I’ve been accepted at KU, K-State, Missouri S&T, Coe College," Smith says, a smile playing across her face. "And I’m still waiting to hear back from some other places: Duke, Penn, Stanford. You know, shooting for the stars."

It's widely acknowledged that college graduates earn more than non-graduates, but given the ever-increasing cost of higher education, is it still worth the investment? Up To Date's Smart Money Experts weigh in. Also, an update on recent financial headlines. 

Guests:

Kyle Palmer / KCUR 89.3

Brittany admits this is a risk: telling her story, being so public. As a nod to that risk, she only wants her first name used. But along with her fear, there's something else: anger. 

"I want to be as honest as possible," she says. "It's what I'm going through, what many other kids like me [in Kansas City] are going through, and it's something we don't talk about: it's ignored, it's in the shadows, and it shouldn't be like that." 

A graduating high school senior without US citizenship reflects on her journey so far. With several college options to choose from, how does this accomplished student's immigration status influence the decision about where to go?

Guest:

Sam Zeff / KCUR

  How much does a college degree cost? What kind of salary will an engineering student make when they graduate? What about an English major?

Starting Wednesday crunching those numbers will get a lot easier for students who are looking at a state university in Kansas. There’s now one-stop shopping for students and parents looking at Kansas universities.

U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill is venturing out across Missouri to gather input and garner public support about making college less expensive.

The Democratic senator kicked off a statewide tour on college affordability at Metro High School in St. Louis. She spent time Monday morning talking with college administrators from local institutions -- including Washington University, the University of Missouri-St. Louis, Webster University and St. Louis Community College.

Flickr/Adam_Procter400

For a small group of high school seniors in the metro, their college options are narrowing because of a law passed last year in Jefferson City. 

Once-affordable options like Metropolitan Community College now seem like iffy bets. UMKC and Northwest Missouri State are a stretch. Mizzou? Forget about it.  

Kyle Palmer / KCUR

On a Saturday afternoon, four female students from Kansas City's Alta Vista Charter High School are making a three-hour trip in a rented minivan to Omaha. As they get closer, they each practice their pitches for why they deserve a full-ride scholarship to college. 

Brittany emphasizes the long hours she puts into extracurricular work making an electric car.

Anahi lays out how she wants to be a lawyer to better "serve my community" as an adult.

A student advocacy group wants to reform how Missouri awards scholarships to top-performing students.

Right now any student who scores a 31 or higher on the ACT and stays in-state for college is eligible for a Bright Flight Scholarship worth about $3,000.

But Faith Sandler with St. Louis Graduates says these scholarships are being disproportionately awarded to students whose families can afford to pay for college.

COD Newsroom / Flickr

First-generation college students head to campus saddled with hopes and dreams, but not necessarily the same resources as their peers. With rigorous academic demands, responsibilities to their families, rising college tuition and increased focus on experiences like study abroad, students breaking through the higher-ed barrier face a unique set of challenges. 

Guests:

Laura Ziegler / KCUR

It's not the norm, but it's not uncommon for fraternities to recruit high school seniors to join their organizations. Those that do often reach out to high school athletic coaches, and tap legacies (students with generational ties to the fraternity) and siblings for a night out on the town or a ball game.

At the University of Kansas, it is an age-old tradition.

College football isn’t about touchdowns or bowl games— it’s about money. That's according to Gilbert Gaul, author of Billion-Dollar Ball: A Journey Through the Big-Money Culture of College Football. Gaul spent years finding out just how far universities will go for a winning football pro gram. 

Sam Zeff / KCUR

Low-income college students got some good news Wednesday from Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon.

Nixon announced additional money will be directed toward the need-based Access Missouri scholarship program.

At a news conference on the University of Missouri-Kansas City campus, the governor said Access Missouri serves about 50,000 students at both two- year and four-year institutions.

Bigstock

You hear a lot about students being career or college ready — it’s really a rather new way to judge high school success. So new, that there hasn’t been much research about it.

The Kansas City Area Education Research Consortium Tuesday will release its first report on career or college readiness. The report, which will be made available to educators in both Kansas and Missouri, shows data that is not particularly surprising.

Sexual assault on college campuses is getting new attention these days as societal attitudes change regarding this issue. On this edition of Up To Date, Steve Kraske speaks with two local Title IX officials about how they educate students and faculty, and investigate sexual assault allegations.

Guests:

nshepard / Flickr-CC

For college-bound high school seniors and their parents, December begins the season of decisions. Most applications are due by Dec. 31, and if you've applied early, the results are starting to come.  Now that the admissions departments have spoken, it's time to decide which college is the best fit.

On Monday's Up to Date, Wes Crenshaw joins us to discuss why students often make their college decisions with too much emotion and without enough forethought.

Guests:

TheBlackHour.com

It's that time of year when many high school seniors take on a new title, college applicant. For them and their parents it can be an all-consuming process. On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with Pembroke Hill teacher and college counselor, Tom Medlock, and one of its students going through the process, Seun Adebo. They examine the elements of the total package that is a college application.

MCC-Penn Valley

A new program in the metro is aimed at ensuring that graduating high school seniors intending to go to college don't become victims of "summer melt", the phenomenon where students set for college in the spring don't make it to campus in the fall.

The Kansas City Metro College Connections Center is designed to combat summer melt, an issue especially acute for low-income and first-generation college students.  Steve Kraske previews the new Center's goals with MCC-Penn Valley President Joe Seabrooks and KCUR reporter Elle Moxley.

Western Governors University

Last year, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon signed a new partnership between the state of Missouri and nationally recognized, non-profit Western Governors University.  The idea: help thousands of the 750,000 Missourians with some higher education obtain an affordable college degree.  And affordable it is at just under $3,000 a semester.

Graduation Anxiety

May 5, 2014
Dave Herholz / Flickr/CC

    

Spring is the season of change. Many high school seniors are preparing to leave the familiar to experience the independence that comes with university life. College seniors are expected to go out into the "real world" and take on new responsibilities. On today's Central Standard, psychologist Bruce Liese guides both students and parents through the uncertainties of this transitional period.

Guest:

It’s been three years since the suicide of Sasha Menu Courey, a student at the University of Missouri. But revelations and questions have come to light in the last few weeks — allegations that Sasha had been raped by at least one fellow student, perhaps three members of the football team.

Colleges and universities serve several purposes: they are places to get credentials necessary for a career; they are  places to learn; they are homes. At a crucial time in their lives young adults live together, make memories, get in trouble and grow up.

On Wednesday's Central Standard, host Brian Ellison delves into campus housing  and how it's progressed over the last few decades, as students arrive with higher expectations and schools are trying to meet them.

We’ll also hear about new apartments catering to athletes at KU and other schools across the country.

Earlham College / Flickr-CC

The applications are finished and sent off, and now it’s time to wait for a verdict from your teen’s chosen range of colleges. But when the acceptances do roll in, how do you choose what’s best? 

On Monday's Up to Date, psychologist Wes Crenshaw joins us to talk about the important factors to consider when you’re trying to make the best match for academic and social success. We’ll also talk with two teens about how to set up for a happy college life and what you should avoid.

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