Civil War

History
3:20 pm
Thu June 19, 2014

Then And Now: A Look Back At The Battle Of Westport

The Harris House Hotel that stood at Westport Road and Pennsylvania Avenue served as Union Maj. Gen. Samuel Curtis' command post.
Missouri Valley Special Collections, Kansas City Public Library

If you've ever noticed plaques in Kansas City's Westport district describing Civil War-era events, then you have at least a little background on the Battle of Westport, a series of battles that ended in a decisive Union victory and emancipation for slaves in Missouri.

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Up to Date
9:00 am
Thu June 19, 2014

The Battle Of Westport 150 Years Later

Mural of the Battle of Westport
Credit Newell Convers Wyeth / Missouri State Capitol

In October of 1864, Kansas City played host to a dramatic clash of Union and Confederate forces. Thousands of troops squared off along Brush Creek and Blue River in the Battle of Westport, the largest Civil War battle west of the Mississippi River. On Thursday's Up to Date Steve Kraske talks with preservationist Daniel Smith about the legacy of the "Gettysburg of the West."

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Up to Date
9:00 am
Tue June 17, 2014

Jeff Shaara Is Back With Third Civil War Novel

Credit www.randomhouse.com

Bestselling author Jeff Shaara is renowned for his gritty depiction of Civil War battles. His fictionalized accounts of the historical events have appeared in previous works and he returns with his latest offering, The Smoke at Dawn. On Tuesday's Up to Date Steve Kraske talks with the author about how he fleshes out the known facts and in doing so creates a detailed account of the War Between the States.

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Up to Date
4:00 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Past Bleeding Into Present: Quantrill's Raid

Bleeding Kansas, Bleeding Missouri looks at the long-held tensions on the two states' borders.

Bleeding Kansas wasn’t just a figurative term, and if you need proof, just look at Quantrill’s Raid on Lawrence.

On Wednesday's Up to Date, we examine the circumstances that led to the famous massacre, from the 1861 sacking of Osceola in slave-state Missouri to other rising violence of the Civil War with guests Jonathan Earle and Diane Mutti Burke, who edited Bleeding Kansas, Bleeding Missouri: The Long Civil War on the Border.

Guests:

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Up to Date
6:00 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Steve's Bookshelf: Fighting Outlaws, Wars & A Mysterious Disease

Susannah Cahalan, Jeff Shaara and Mark Lee Gardener's books are all on Steve's Bookshelf.

Pull off a bank job in the Wild West with Jesse James, join Ulysses S. Grant as he leads Union troops into the entrenched Confederate stronghold of Vicksburg and solve the puzzle of a woman's month of madness.

On Wednesday's Up to Date, we talk with the authors of the latest titles on Steve’s Bookshelf:

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Up to Date
9:52 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Looking Back At Gettysburg

Allen Guelzo joins Steve Kraske to talk about Gettysburg on Up to Date.

It’s been 150 years since the muskets fired and men in both blue and gray fell to the ground at battleground in Pennsylvania. Gettysburg’s dubious distinction was to have the most casualties of any battle of the Civil War. 

On Monday's Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with Allen Guelzo, author of Gettysburg: The Last Invasion, about the politics and power plays that surrounded the famous battle.

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Central Standard Friday
9:38 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Guerrilla Warfare During The Civil War

Credit The History Press

When the Confederate Army was pushed from Missouri, a slave state that hadn't ceded from the Union, in late 1861 ordinary people transformed themselves into guerilla fighters for the confederate cause.  A mayor's son and town teacher were among those who found themselves part of one of the most violent band of guerilla fighters lead by "Bloody" Bill Anderson.  After the war they became notable bank and train robbers.  But, there were also ordinary citizens who dedicated their lives to hunting these guerillas down, sometimes with equal violence.  Author James "Jim" W.

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Up to Date
6:00 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

History & Tourism Around The State Line

Former KC Star TV critic Aaron Barnhart talks about Quantrill's raiders in an interview with Steve Kraske. He and his wife Diane Eickhoff, co-authors of The Big Divide, visited Up to Date April 24, 2013.
Beth Lipoff/KCUR

Go to enough Kansas and Missouri historical spots, and you'll find many of them are steeped in the history of the Civil War.

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Up to Date
10:59 pm
Tue October 30, 2012

Lincoln's Struggle For A United Front

David Von Drehle and Rise to Greatness
Rainy Day Books

In 1862, Abraham Lincoln glued together pieces of a fractured nation to support his cause against all odds. But how did he do it?

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Up to Date
9:18 am
Thu June 14, 2012

Jeff Shaara: 'A Blaze Of Glory'

Shiloh stands as one of the bloodiest clashes in American history, one sealed the fate of the Civil War and cemented the long, drawn out conflict that followed the 1862 battle.

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Up to Date
6:00 pm
Wed March 21, 2012

The U.S. Capitol & The Coming Of The Civil War

The construction of the U.S. Capitol began with a building plan adopted in 1793.  Its history of being built, burnt, rebuilt & extended meant its completion came at the most crucial point in our nation’s development: the Civil War.

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Walt Bodine Show
11:53 am
Fri February 17, 2012

KC History: Small-Scale Slavery In Missouri

Louisa and Harry E. Hayward. Circa 1858. Louisa was the slave nurse for Harry, who was seated in her lap. The image suggests the intimate and complicated relations that existed between slaveholding family members and their slaves.
Courtesy of the Missouri History Museum Phoographs and Prints Collectiojns, St. Louis.

On Friday's Walt Bodine Show, co-host Monroe Dodd discusses the history of small-scale slavery in Missouri with Diane Mutti Burke.

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