civil rights

Tell KCUR
10:51 am
Thu July 3, 2014

Kansas Citians: 50 Years After The Civil Rights Act, We Still Have A Long Road

Marriage equality was a common issue Kansas Citians cited when we asked, "What are today's biggest challenges for civil rights?"
Credit Wikimedia -- CC

Wednesday marked the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

As a country, we’ve since made progress on equal protections laws — not as much as some would’ve hoped — and new issues have emerged.

This week, we took to the airwaves and social media and asked: What are today’s biggest challenges for civil rights?

Discrimination based on race remains a hot-button issue, according to your answers.

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Up To Date
9:00 am
Thu July 3, 2014

The Untold Journey Of Civil Rights Photographers

Matt Herron

Thursday's Up to Date brings the never before told story of powerful events witnessed by five young photographers during the momentous summer of 1964 in the segregated South. Guest host Brian Ellison talks with Matt Herron, one of the photographers and author of Mississippi Eyes: The Story and Photography of the Southern Documentary Project, "the only book to provide a firsthand account of what it was actually like to photograph the civil rights struggle in the Deep South."

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Central Standard
4:57 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Reflecting On The Civil Rights Act Of 1964

Civil Rights March in Alabama
Credit Peter Pettus

July 2nd is the 50th anniversary of The Civil Rights Act of 1964. This historic piece of legislation outlawed race based discrimination, enfranchised voter registration rights, and desegregated businesses, public spaces, and schools.

On Wednesday's Central Standard, Rev. Nelson "Fuzzy" Thompson and Anita Dixon share their unique first hand experiences with the Civil Rights Movement in and around Kansas City, then and now.

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Tell KCUR
9:38 am
Tue July 1, 2014

Tell KCUR: What Are Today’s Biggest Challenges For Civil Rights?

What are today's biggest challenges for civil rights and how can we overcome them? Tweet us your answers with the #TellKCUR hashtag.
Credit File photo / KCUR

As Kansas Citians gear up for a holiday weekend celebrating the United States’ Independence Day, civil rights advocates also are commemorating another event in our country’s history.

Fifty years ago this week, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 into law, ending, among other things, the existence of “whites only” bathrooms and drinking fountains.

A lot has changed since 1964.

We want to know what civil rights issues the United States and Kansas City still face today.

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Up to Date
9:00 am
Tue June 17, 2014

Dr. Mary Frances Berry: The Legacy Of Sixties Activism

Credit maryfrancesberry.com

For four decades, Mary Frances Berry has been a civil rights activist. Famously fired from the US Civil Rights Commission before being rehired by President Reagan, she’s gone on to chair the commission, serve as the first woman and African American to be chancellor of the University of Colorado, and teach legal history at the University of Pennsylvania.

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Up to Date
10:34 am
Mon January 13, 2014

Former NAACP Chair On The Continuing Struggle Of Civil Rights

Julian Bond joins Steve Kraske to talk about civil rights, past and present.
Credit naacp.org

Former NAACP national chair Julian Bond was part of the original Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s.

In the second part of Monday's Up to Date, we talk with him about his involvement in civil rights and how it’s still relevant in today’s climate. We also get his impressions of Obama’s presidency. 

Guest:

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People
10:21 am
Thu January 9, 2014

The Life And Work Of Kansas City Civil Rights Activist, Alvin Sykes

Alvin Sykes will speak at the Kansas City Public Library later this month about his life and work.
Credit Laura Ziegler / KCUR

Kansas City native Alvin Sykes is a self-taught civil rights activist who has done instrumental work with the justice system, particularly with unsolved civil rights crimes, including the high-profile murder of Emmett Till, and the 1980 murder of Kansas City musician Steve Harvey.

This month he is giving a talk at the Kansas City Public library, where he was the 2013 scholar in residence. Sykes educated himself in law and civil rights using resources from the city's public library system.

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Up to Date
6:00 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

Looking At The Larger Context of MLK's 'Mountaintop'

Martin Luther King, Jr., speaks at a 1962 rally.
Credit New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection

Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "Mountaintop" speech from Memphis is famous for its ending and because he was assassinated the next day. However, much of the speech doesn't receive a lot of attention today. 
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Up to Date
6:00 pm
Wed February 27, 2013

Looking Back At The March On Washington

March on Washington
U.S. Information Agency Press and Publications Service

One of the most iconic moments of the Civil Rights Movement was Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, which took place during the 1963 March on Washington.

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Up to Date
6:00 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

How The Civil Rights Movement Evolved

The King Years: Historic Moments in the Civil Rights Movement

What started as a few protests and sit-ins evolved into the Civil Rights movement, but how did that happen?

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Up to Date
6:00 pm
Tue January 15, 2013

KC's Face Of Civil Rights

Leon Jordan

Kansas City Civil Rights leader Leon Jordan is famous for his unsolved murder, but his work to empower the black community in politics is also part of that story.

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Up to Date
9:48 am
Tue December 18, 2012

Looking To The Future At UMKC

UMKC Chancellor Leo Morton

Leading a large university is no cakewalk, and the University of Missouri-Kansas City is no exception.

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Central Standard
2:02 pm
Tue May 15, 2012

MLK's Spiritual & Intellectual Father

We may see Martin Luther King, Jr., as the father of the civil rights movement, but history teaches us that the 'family' around movements has its roots in previous generations.

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Central Standard
10:15 am
Wed May 9, 2012

Civil Rights Exhibit Displays The Power Of Popular Media

Charlie Upchurch KCUR

In 1955, Emmitt Till was a young boy visiting family in the South, and was brutally murdered. After his death, his mother made the decision to send the explicit photos of his autopsy to the media, saying, “Let the world see what I’ve seen.”

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Up to Date
1:33 pm
Tue February 21, 2012

Actress Portrays Late Civil Rights Leader & Texas Congresswoman

The late civil rights leader and Congresswoman Barbara Jordan.

Barbara Jordan was a lawyer and educator who was a congresswoman from 1972 to 1978 , the first African American congresswoman from the deep south and the first woman ever elected to the Texas Senate.

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Central Standard
1:30 pm
Tue January 24, 2012

The Right To Remain Informed

When a police officer asks “Do you know why I pulled you over?” what should you say? At what point, in dealing with the police, can everything you say or do be used against you?

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KCUR News
2:53 pm
Tue April 20, 2010

Web Extra: Full-Length Interview With Michael G. Long

Kansas City , Mo. – This is the extended interview with Michael G. Long, editor of FIRST CLASS CITIZENSHIP: The Civil Rights Letters Of Jackie Robinson.

Dr.Long was at the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum last weekend as part of a program commemorating Jackie Robinson Day on April 17th.

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