children

Lisa Brewster / Flickr

My Little Ponies may be great enticements for toilet training, but new research shows that material rewards for accomplishments can lead to materialism down the road. Kids raised with "stuff" as the main motivator for good behavior disproportionately correlate material things with self-worth as adults. The researcher discusses her findings. 

Guest:

  • Lan Chaplin, University of Illinois in Chicago

A bill in the Kansas Legislature would create a new class of foster homes. They would have to be heterosexual couples married at least seven years, with no tobacco or alcohol in the home, and they would have to attend a regular social gathering like church. The families would be paid more than other foster care providers.

Republican state Sen. Forrest Knox, who is a licensed foster parent, says the foster care system in Kansas needs some changes. He believes these requirements will provide the best environment for kids.

Bridget Colla / Flickr

Medical and scientific communities have been working hard to reassure parents that vaccinating children is safe, especially in light of current Measles incidents in the United States. But there is something about immunization that triggers fear in a lot of people, even people who do opt in. What is that fear about? How do human beings perceive and weigh different kinds of risks on behalf of their children? 

Guests:

  Vaccination is just one of many medical choices made for children. On this edition of Up To Date, Steve Kraske and guests talk about who gets to weigh in on those decisions: the parents, the doctors, the government?  And what input do children have regarding their own health care?

Guests:

Child nutrition is increasingly a topic of debate. Steve Kraske and guests take a closer look at what we’re feeding our children beginning with baby food.  They also look at the impact food insecurity has on making nutritional choices for our kids.

Guests:

In today's hectic world, teaching kids to organize their schedules can be a parent's biggest challenge. On this edition of Up To Date, Wes Crenshaw joins us to offer advice on how young people can manage their time and energy.

Guests:

An estimated 17,000 Kansas City kids don't have enough diapers.

Their families just can't afford them.

"Diapers and other hygiene products – including cleaning supplies – are not provided by any state or federal subsidy," says Joanne Goldblum, executive director of the National Diaper Bank Network.

And diapers, especially the disposable kind required by most childcare centers, are a significant expense, up to $100 a week.

If that amount seems high, Goldblum says it's because poor families don't have the same resources as wealthier ones.

Ian D. Keating / Flickr -- Creative Commons

 

The Annie E. Casey Foundation, a child advocacy group, released its annual Kids Count report on Tuesday, and Kansas ranked 15th overall and Missouri 29th. The report assesses overall child well-being based on four broad categories: economic well-being, education, health, and family and community.

Both Kansas and Missouri saw their indicators for education and health improve while their indicators for economic well-being and family and community mostly worsened.

Trevor / Flickr, Creative Commons

Expecting a new baby can force many parents to make complicated financial decisions. On Monday's Central Standard, we were joined by the Cash Money Crew to discuss how to approach and manage the monetary costs that come with a new child.

Guests:

unbound.org

As the U.S. struggles with the thousands of "border kids" crossing its southern boundaries, one organization in Kansas City, Kansas is working with families in Latin America to help children remain in their own communities.

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

A furry beast, a brave rider and a roaring crowd make up the list of ingredients for the Western rodeo tradition known as “mutton busting.” Think of it as bull-riding, but for 6-year-olds, and the furry beast is actually a wooly sheep.

Mutton busting has its roots in Colorado, where it was first introduced in the 1980s at the National Western Stock Show in Denver. The crowd-pleaser is now a favorite at many rodeos and county fairs across the Midwest and Great Plains.

KCUR

Kansas Citians are pretty accustomed to snow days after the past 12 months.

A year ago, a winter storm clobbered Kansas City with 20.5 inches of snow.

The February snowfall, which made it into the record books at the National Weather Service,  preceded several other severe snow storms that hit Kansas City in 2013.

Medical problems, gender identity or varied abilities that put children out of the mainstream can bring overwhelming challenges for the individual and their family. In the first part of Monday's Up to Datewe take a look at how this struggle forms identities for the children and the parents.

Guest:

  • Andrew Solomon, author of Far From the Tree: Parents, Children and the Search for Identity
thejbird / Flickr-CC

There was a time when being a kid did not involve needing a planner. Those days are long gone for many families in the new world of lessons, sports, classes, tutoring, clubs, church groups and academics. Many children have busier schedules than their parents, which means the parents’ schedules fill up, too.

Kristen_a / Flickr - CC

Imagine your young son tells you he wants to play with Barbies. Or that he prefers a purple backpack to a blue one. Perhaps your little girl tells you she doesn’t want a doll for Christmas, but would prefer a monster truck. Would you be uncomfortable?

When raising a child, what gender choices do you make for your child, and what do you let them decide for themselves?  What defines a boy as a boy, or a girl as a girl?

Should Sperm Donors Be Required To Pay Child Support?

Nov 6, 2013
Wikimedia Commons - CC

A few years ago, a lesbian couple in Kansas posted an ad to Craigslist asking a man to donate sperm so they could have a child. William Marotta responded, refused their offer of $50, and signed over his sperm.

The couple gave birth to a child, however,  when the child started receiving state aid, Marotta found himself being sued by the state for thousands in child support.

Kamal Zharif Kamaludin/Flickr-CC

Playing cops and robbers is just part of normal childhood, right? Should we be more concerned about what children learn through these games?

lindasolomonphotography.com

A homeless shelter might seem an unlikely place to look for the hopes and dreams of children, but for one photographer, it's a way to shine a light for children stuck in bad situations.

A task force looking for ways to reduce childhood poverty in Kansas wrapped up a series of meetings Monday. The governor appointed group discussed three so-called "pathways out of poverty," which include ways to improve education, get more Kansans working and strengthen families.

The committee was told that in 2011 around 19 percent of Kansas kids lived in poverty, and they’re hoping that focusing on some key areas can reduce that.

PraveenbenK / Flickr--CC

The Crittenton Children’s Center Friday announced it was receiving a major grant to help preschool-aged children cope with trauma.

In front of a crowd of around 200 health professionals at the Kaufmann Foundation, Crittenton CEO Janine Hron said that the Center will be able to expand its Head Start – Trauma Smart program thanks to a $2.3 million grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Kansas lawmakers this year spared early childhood programs from the budget axe, but advocates for those programs say children didn't fare well overall in the 2013 legislative session.

The top concern, according to April Holman of the non-profit Kansas Action for Children, is that lawmakers balanced the budget using more than $9 million that should have gone into an endowment for early childhood funding.

Making Homes Safe For Kids

Apr 17, 2013
charlieshouse.org

When you’ve put child locks on all the cabinets and plugged all the electrical outlets, what’s left to child-proof your home? 

Bill Burke/Page One

Though she’s famous for her family name, Caroline Kennedy has made a name for herself in other ways, too.

It may be hard to remember, but the 2008 election broke racial and gender norms for politics. With President Obama, Sarah Palin and Hilary Clinton among the presidential and vice-presidential candidates in both major parties, the idea of race and gender was a common discussion. But what did that election mean to those who didn’t, and couldn’t vote?


Financial Advice: Kids And Money

Jul 16, 2012
om5com / flickr

There comes a time when every parents needs to sit their kid down for the talk. Because your kids have questions like -- "How much money do you make?" "Is this a recession?" "Are we poor?" On this Monday's Central Standard, a look at how best to teach your kids about money and saving.

School’s out for summer, so keep your kids' brains busy, and develop that summer reading list.

Thursday on Up to Date, Steve Kraske welcomes Johnson County Library staffers Kate McNair, Debbie McLeod (ret.) and Bradley Debrick to share their favorite picks, from No Sleep for the Sheep to The ABCs of Baseball.

New Trends In Clowning

Apr 17, 2012

In the second half of this Wednesday's Central Standard, we send in a clown.

For people with dyslexia, problems recognizing words can make life difficult. Children usually aren't diagnosed until elementary school, when it becomes clear they're struggling with reading. But scientists say it could be possible to diagnose and help kids much earlier by identifying problems with visual attention — long before they learn to read.

They called it "The Streak." Father and daughter, together, with a book, Dad reading the words. At first, the idea was to read aloud together for 100 consecutive nights.

It’s hard enough to keep your kids away from the Xbox on a normal weekday… it must be even tougher when they’re home for winter vacation.  But technology might just help this time around: perhaps you can even convince your child to turn off the video game and pick up a Kindle...or a Nook… an iPad or even (yes!) paper…and dig deep into a great story.

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