Cartoons

Courtesy Kari Wahlgren

As a little girl growing up in central Kansas, Kari Wahlgren dreamed of becoming a voice actor. She landed her first role at 11 years old, and now, she’s working professionally in Los Angeles.

From her lead role in the anime cartoon series, FLCL, to her first Disney series, Super Robot Monkey Team Hyperforce Go!, Wahlgren has voiced hundreds of characters since she moved to Los Angeles.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

For many people, it is a career change, a promotion, or maybe an industry award that propels their professional life to the next level.

For Tom Toro, it was the first time he sold a cartoon to The New Yorker.

"It happened in a very modern way," says Toro. "My life changed via email."

It seems like a somewhat underwhelming email. The subject line, Toro says, read simply, 'Okay.'

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Renowned historian David McCullough has produced many books and speeches that touch on the country's stories and accomplishments. In a new collection, he samples those words to remind readers of The American Spirit. Then, Kansas City cartoonist Tom Toro shares his approach to successfully churning out editorial satire.

Glenn McCoy / Belleville News-Democrat / Universal Press Syndicate

You might know their opinions — even if you don't know their names.

Political cartoons are a fixture that appear alongside news stories and editorials, providing humorous and absurd commentary on issues and current events.

Cartoonists Lee Judge and Glenn McCoy told Central Standard host Gina Kaufmann that political cartoons have a special place in the world of media.

Lee Judge / Kansas City Star

A week and a half into the Trump administration, we'll find out whether political cartoonists still think of this president as a gift to satire.

Plus, we check in with Lawrence musician Matt Pryor, whose band The Get Up Kids had a big following in the 1990s.

Guests:

Manitoba Provincial Archives - CC

Do moderates even exist in today's bifurcated political landscape? Today, we examine the ideals of centrism and learn about some of history's notable moderates. Then, we celebrate National Winnie the Pooh Day by remembering the morale-boosting bear of World War I who inspired the world-famous cartoon character.

With the national Republican Party in turmoil, we look at the unexpected politics of African-Americans in the GOP. Then, whether it's dealing with doctors, dating in one's 70s, or new and unexpected bodily changes, growing older can dismay some folks, but William Novak says laughter is often the best medicine.

Brian Gordon / FowlLanguageComics.com

In his 18 years working for Hallmark, Brian Gordon saw plenty of people get fired.

Even so, he'd convinced himself that it wasn't his turn.

"Well, surely Hallmark thinks so highly of me they wouldn't dream of letting me go in a million years," he told Steve Kraske on KCUR's Up To Date.

But in June of 2015, he received an email informing him that his time with the company was finished.

"You would have thought I'd get a card or something," Gordon says.

With the birth of his first-born, Brian Gordon quickly learned that parenting wasn't exactly what he'd expected, much less what had been promised. So Gordon turned to cartooning, creating a duck family to comment on the joys and pains of parenthood in Fowl Language: Welcome to Parenting

Charles Barsotti

Kansas City-based cartoonist Charles Barsotti died Monday, according to The Kansas City Star.

Barsotti, 80, was a regular contributor to The New Yorker, The Atlantic and USA Today. He published more than 1,300 cartoons during his career.

The comic strip Doonesbury has tackled some important social and political issues over the years. Garry Trudeau became the first comic strip artist to win a Pulitzer Prize, and was a finalist for the prize three subsequent times, including in 2004 and 2005, when his strip addressed the Iraq War. His storylines have centered around the military's "don't ask don't tell" policy, unfound weapons of mass destruction, and U.S. Presidents.