Border War

Courtesy photo / Kari Deude

For more than 100 years, the University of Kansas Jayhawks and the University of Missouri Tigers have been embroiled in a bitter rivalry.

It's a rivalry that's alive and well, even though the teams haven't played each other in two years.

RELATEDJayhawks and Tigers Love to Hate Each Other Across State Line

Lisa Rodriguez / KCUR

There was no shortage of Mizzou hate Dec. 13  when the University of Kansas played the University of Utah at the Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo.

Thousands of Kansas fans gathered, ironically in Missouri, to watch the Jayhawks play.

Kansas and Missouri haven’t played one another since 2012, when Missouri left the Big 12 Conference for the Southeastern Conference.

But just mention the University of Missouri to a die-hard Jayhawk and you’ll get a heated response. To fans, it’s more than just a sports rivalry. It's part of their identities.

Eric Langhorst / Flickr Creative Commons

Throughout the year we put the Kansas City metro area under a microscope examining the details of the events and issues facing its residents and leaders.

On this edition of Up to Date, we zoom out for a broader view. Steve Kraske and three area journalists bring us their analysis, thoughts, and observations on what's working and what's not in Kansas City, Mo. 

Guests:

Courtesy photo / KCUR

Thinking about launching your own technology startup in the Kansas City metro?  

Greg Kratofil, a technology attorney with Polsinelli law firm, has some advice.

"Incorporate in Kansas," Kratofil says. "Almost every company that we work with is thinking about accessing capital, some kind of round of financing to help them grow their business. You want to be in a place where you have tools that help your raise that money."

Cara McClain / KCUR

Having to file taxes in two states is the biggest drawback to the state line.

At least according to one Kansas Citian, Marge Gasnick (@gasnickmarge), who responded to our question of the week on Twitter: How does the state line affect your life?

As KCUR reporters begin to examine the state line for the next few months, part of our Beyond Our Borders project,  we wanted to hit up our audience for story ideas.

The Missouri House has passed legislation aimed at declaring a "cease-fire" in the so-called economic "border war" between Missouri and Kansas.

moravings.blogspot.com

A metropolitan area that straddles a state line provides plenty of fodder for a discussion on how Kansas Citians choose to divide themselves.

This week, we wanted to know where you draw the lines in the metropolitan area.

We went on the air and used social media to ask: What are the Kansas City metro’s strongest dividing lines? How do they affect your life?

Natural and perceived borders often determine how we live in the Kansas City metropolitan area.

Streets, rivers, the state line and county boundaries are just some of the borders that affect where we eat, work and play.

We want to know which lines are the most divisive in the Kansas City area.

Tell KCUR: What are the Kansas City metro’s strongest geographic dividing lines? How do they affect your life?

The Kansas business lobby is armed with new data to convince this year’s legislature to press for lower taxes and other change. 

The basis is a Kansas Chamber of Commerce commissioned survey of 300 company owners.

The December 2013 questionnaire found 57 percent of those surveyed thought they paid too much in taxes. Thirty-six percent thought they paid about the right amount. 

The study found less interest than in the past in what plays into the economic border war with Missouri, the poaching of jobs back and forth across state line.

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Kansas abolitionists and pro-slavery forces in Missouri fought a bloody border war in the 1850s, splitting the Kansas City region. Some 160 years later the states are still locked in economic combat that pushes businesses, and jobs, back and forth across the state line, with the companies themselves often the only clear winners.

Dan Verbeck / KCUR

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon called for a temporary halt to what’s known as the economic “border war” between Kansas and Missouri Tuesday, in an address to the Greater Kansas City Area Chamber of Commerce.

Both states have a history of offering incentives to draw companies across state line. Nixon wants a temporary moratorium for the Kansas City metro area.

Nixon said his administration and that of Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback have been negotiating the issue.

Kansas City, Missouri wins the latest round in the economic “border wars.” by regaining a company that started on the Missouri side, but moved to Leawood.

A. B. May Company will be moving its headquarters to a former “big box” retail building at 50th and I-435 in Eastern Kansas City. The Economic Development Committee endorsed property tax abatement to offset May's payments on the $12 million in bonds the city will issue.

jimmywayne / Flickr

The Missouri Senate has given first-round approval to a phased-in tax overhaul designed to help the Show-Me State compete with neighboring Kansas, which recently slashed its tax rates. 

Missouri-Kansas Jobs Poaching On The Rise

Jan 24, 2013

Missouri and Kansas are using eight- and nine-figure economic development subsidy packages to steal jobs from each other. A new study finds no abatement.

Kansas and Missouri say they’d like to work together, but they keep poaching each other’s businesses.

Jeremy Bernfeld / Harvest Public Media

A daily digest of headlines from KCUR:
Food Industry Courts Flexitarians, What’s Next in The Border War & more top headlines.

use.com

Two days after clinching at least a share of the Big 12 regular season title, the University of Kansas basketball team plays again Monday night at Oklahoma State.

Will The Tiger Lie Down With The Jayhawk?

Feb 20, 2012

On Saturday, February 25, 2012, a more than 100 year-old tradition will come to an end. It's a competition that some say has roots in the Civil War era.