bioethics

When Henrietta Lacks died in 1951, she had no idea that she would change the future of modern medicine forever. Medical researchers used cells harvested from her cervix for research projects that led to countless medical breakthroughs--all without her family's knowledge or consent. The author who uncovered the story explores her years-long obsession with getting to know Henrietta Lacks. 

Guest:

Bioethics is a heavy issue to the average person, and most of us prefer not to think about death. But having a plan in place for when the worst happens is crucial.

Sherriene Jones Sontag

There was a lot of hand-shaking and back-slapping at the recent groundbreaking for the National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility in Manhattan, Kan. Soon, the first construction will begin on an independent utility plant for the top-security animal disease lab.  

It’s been 4 and a half  years since the Department of Homeland Security awarded the project to Kansas, and it's been a rocky road to this point.

For a long time, the 46-acre site in a north corner of the Kansas State University campus has been fenced off,  guarded by security,  with an Olympic pool-size hole inside. 

Does death always have to be a taboo subject?

www.nist.gov

Should a child be able to grow up unhindered by the knowledge that later in life he or she will suffer from a serious illness?

Making the right medical choices is harder than ever. We are overwhelmed by information from all sides: doctors' recommendations, dissenting expert opinions, statistics, the advice of friends, and a never-ending stream of drug company ads.