1960s

In a season of Grateful Dead reunion shows, followers of the band reminisce about the community they once formed, and discuss its revival in 2015. 

kcrockhistory.com

For Mike McGonigle, it's a sticker on his car that gives him away as a Grateful Dead enthusiast.

"There are Deadheads amongst us everywhere," he says. "I constantly get people waving at me, I see other Deadhead stickers, and it's kind of a community of people that when you recognize it, you have a connection with those people."

In the 1970s and 1980s especially, there was a vibrant community of Grateful Dead followers here in Kansas City. They used to follow the band's tour route: going to shows, trading sandwiches for back-rubs, sleeping in cars and otherwise living the hippie dream.

Most of them have settled into mainstream society since those days, but this summer's 50th anniversary reunion shows have brought members of that community out of the woodwork — and back into contact with each other. 

Back in the 1960s, long hair, political protests and nudity on stage were all taboo subjects to appear in the theater, but that changed when the musical Hair debuted. Over 40 years later the musical is still provocative to audiences in a contemporary way.

The show is currently on tour and opens in Kansas City tonight at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts and runs through Sunday. Music Director Lilli Wosk and Noah Plomgren, who plays Claude, join Brian Ellison to talk about life on tour and how this ground-breaking musical is still relevant to today's audiences.

What was happening on the cinema scene a half century ago? How have movies changed and in what ways have they remained the same?

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What was happening on the cinema scene a half century ago? And how have movies changed and in what ways have they remained the same?