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NPR's Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep, and KCUR's Michael Byars and Maria Carter bring the day's local and national news.

Morning Edition provides breaking news, news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary and reviews important new music, books and events in the arts.  

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Around the Nation
4:13 am
Wed June 27, 2012

UVa Board Reverses Itself, Reinstates President

Originally published on Wed June 27, 2012 6:15 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Business
4:13 am
Wed June 27, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Wed June 27, 2012 6:55 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

NPR's business starts with living wills for banks.

The nation's biggest banks are getting ready to file plans with the government for how they would unwind their assets if they were to fail. The plans are called living wills. Regulators want to avoid the type of damage the collapse of Lehman Brothers had on the financial system. Big banks have a July 1st deadline to submit their living wills to the Federal Reserve and FDIC. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR Story
4:07 am
Wed June 27, 2012

Splitting Media Outlets Could Help News. Corp. Investors

Originally published on Wed June 27, 2012 5:49 pm

News Corp. executives have confirmed they are considering dividing the company in two. One new company would hold all of News Corp.'s profitable entertainment and television outlets. The other would hold all of its newspaper and publishing outlets. The move is seen as a way for the Murdoch family to hang on to its less profitable and troubled newspapers while pleasing investors with a newly independent and far more profitable entertainment company.

NPR Story
4:07 am
Wed June 27, 2012

College Presidents Approve Switch To Football Playoff System

Originally published on Wed June 27, 2012 6:08 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

College football fans are belting out a one word chant this morning: Finally. As in finally, there's a post-season playoff at the sport's highest level. Yesterday, a committee of college presidents approved a four-team, three game plan. When it starts in 2014, it'll end major college football's isolation as the only big time team sport that does not decide its championship with a playoff. NPR's Tom Goldman has more.

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NPR Story
4:07 am
Wed June 27, 2012

How Justices Work Through Big Decisions Like Health Care

Originally published on Wed June 27, 2012 5:34 am

In advance of the Supreme Court's ruling on the Obama health care law, Renee Montagne talks to Jamal Greene — associate professor at Columbia Law School and former clerk for Justice John Paul Stevens — about how the Supreme Court thinks through momentous cases.

The Salt
2:03 am
Wed June 27, 2012

A Nation Of Meat Eaters: See How It All Adds Up

Only Luxembourgers eat more meat per person than Americans.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 8:59 am

As Allison Aubrey and Dan Charles reported today on Morning Edition, meat has more of an impact on the environment than any other food we eat. That's because livestock require so much more food, water, land, and energy than plants to raise and transport. (Listen to the audio above for their conversation with Morning Edition's Linda Wertheimer.)

Take a look here at what goes into just one quarter-pound of hamburger meat.

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Law
2:01 am
Wed June 27, 2012

Exhale, Chicago, A Little Pot May Be Fine(d)

In Chicago, nearly nine out of 10 low-level marijuana busts result in a dismissal.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed June 27, 2012 2:00 pm

In Chicago, a new policy on marijuana possession would mean adults who are caught with a small amount of the illegal drug would receive a fine instead of being arrested.

It's mostly about money and how best to use police resources.

Under current Illinois law, anyone found with less than about 1 ounce of marijuana can be charged with a misdemeanor. If found guilty, they face up to a year in jail and a $2,500 fine.

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Crisis In The Housing Market
2:00 am
Wed June 27, 2012

Morale Takes A Hit At Beleaguered Fannie, Freddie

Created by the federal government during the Great Depression, Fannie Mae became a Washington powerhouse: a highly profitable, private company, protected by the government and boasting huge lobbying clout. But today, Fannie Mae has essentially become a ward of the state.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Wed June 27, 2012 5:47 pm

The collapse of the housing market has led to plenty of finger-pointing in Washington. Two easy targets are Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

These government-backed mortgage giants had to be rescued by taxpayers and now owe the government $188 billion. Still, Fannie and Freddie, which currently make the vast majority of home loans possible, are crucial to supporting the housing market right now.

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Remembrances
10:00 pm
Tue June 26, 2012

Ephron: From 'Silkwood' To 'Sally,' A Singular Voice

Author and screenwriter Nora Ephron died Tuesday in New York. She was 71.
Stephen Lovekin Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 27, 2012 4:59 pm

Nora Ephron brought us two of the most indelible scenes in contemporary cinema — and they're startlingly different.

There's the infamous "Silkwood shower," from the 1983 movie, with Meryl Streep as a terrified worker at a nuclear power plant, being frantically scrubbed after exposure to radiation.

Then there's the scene in which Meg Ryan drives home a point to Billy Crystal at Katz's Deli, in 1989's When Harry Met Sally. You know — the one that ends with "I'll have what she's having."

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Sweetness And Light
9:03 pm
Tue June 26, 2012

The Man Who Painted Sport, Bright and Beautiful

Artist LeRoy Neiman, who died last week at 91, signs serigraphs of baseball's Mike Piazza (left) in 2000.
Kathy Willens AP

Originally published on Wed June 27, 2012 11:44 am

Framed in my library is a sketch that LeRoy Neiman dashed off of me on the back of a menu, when he was watching me speak several years ago. LeRoy, who died the other day, was somewhat better known for another sketch, the "nymphette" that has appeared in Playboy since 1955 — but, of course, he's ever famous for simply being our most celebrated sports artist.

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Business
7:25 am
Tue June 26, 2012

Microsoft Snaps Up Yammer For $1.2 Billion

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with some yammering.

Microsoft is buying the tech startup Yammer for $1.2 billion, thus proving that you can get a 10 figure sales prices for a company called Yammer. It's the company's attempt to get a social network in its portfolio. Now Yammer, if you're not familiar with it, is like Facebook, but for businesses. It allows employees to see what colleagues in the same company are doing - in case you can't learn that at the water cooler.

Around the Nation
6:32 am
Tue June 26, 2012

Dock Collapses Under Michigan Wedding Party

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 7:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Around the Nation
6:25 am
Tue June 26, 2012

Dozens Protest Mass. Town's Cursing Ban

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 7:25 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

National Security
4:22 am
Tue June 26, 2012

100 Suspected Radicals May Be Part Of U.S. Military

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 11:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

The U.S. military has taken a close look at itself and found evidence of threats within its ranks.

MONTAGNE: The Pentagon, along with the FBI, has conducted more than 100 investigations into possible Islamist extremists inside the military.

NPR has learned that about a dozen of those cases are considered serious.

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Around the Nation
3:58 am
Tue June 26, 2012

License Plate Readers Spark Privacy Concerns

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 7:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Chances are that your car's license plate has been photographed recently and downloaded into a data bank. The leading vendor of automated license plate readers says they're now used in nearly every state. Police say they fight crime, but there are privacy concerns about the new technology, as Charlotte Alright reports from Vermont Public Radio.

(SOUNDBITE OF CAR STARTING)

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Business
3:58 am
Tue June 26, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 7:25 am

Visitors to the online travel agency Orbitz see different results depending on what kind of computer they're using, according to The Wall Street Journal. Users of Apple computers are seeing more expensive options than those who search for hotels using a PC.

NPR Story
3:47 am
Tue June 26, 2012

Justices Uphold Arizona's Show Me Your Papers Provision

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 7:25 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

News junkies yesterday had one of those classic moments involving the Supreme Court. The High Court ruled on Arizona's immigration law.

INSKEEP: And there was a period of frantic uncertainty as reporters and analysts tried to figure out what the ruling meant. Now it is clear the Court has given a mixed verdict to Arizona's law, casting doubt on copycat laws in other states.

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NPR Story
3:47 am
Tue June 26, 2012

Ariz. Gov. Brewer Calls Supreme Court Ruling A Win

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 7:25 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's return, now, to the governor of Arizona, Jan Brewer. As we heard a moment ago, she's calling this a win, even though the Court struck down most of the Arizona law and said it would wait and see how the show me your papers provision is applied.

GOVERNOR JAN BREWER: Arizona's and every other state's inherent authority to protect and defend its people has been upheld.

INSKEEP: Governor Brewer is one of many Arizona voices responding to the ruling. Here's NPR's Ted Robbins.

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NPR Story
3:47 am
Tue June 26, 2012

How Will Immigration Ruling Effect Other States?

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 11:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In Alabama, a similar but tougher immigration law faces its own legal challenge. That case had been on hold, pending a ruling on the Arizona law. Andrew Yeager reports from member station WBHM.

ANDREW YEAGER, BYLINE: State Senator Scott Beason's phone has been ringing off the hook.

STATE SEN. SCOTT BEASON: Everybody calls and says, you know, have you read the opinion yet? And my answer is always no, because I've been on the phone constantly since. But no, I haven't...

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The Salt
2:35 am
Tue June 26, 2012

Fancy Names Can Fool Wine Geeks Into Paying More For A Bottle

New York Winemaker Christopher Tracy and a bottle of his Blaufrankisch. The wine's difficult to pronounce name may attract oenophiles.
Charles Lane NPR

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 12:56 pm

Which costs more, a bottle of Fat Bastard or a Tselepou (TSe-le-po)? What about a Cupcake versus some other name that's difficult for Americans to pronounce? Turns out, when it comes to wine, research suggests that the name alone can affect how much consumers are willing to pay for it. But is it that easy to dupe an oenophile?

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Middle East
2:08 am
Tue June 26, 2012

As 'Hungry Season' Nears, Yemenis Struggle For Food

Displaced Yemenis receive food aid from the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights in the southern province of Abyan. While food is available in the country, many Yemenis cannot afford to buy it. About 10 million people are going hungry, aid groups say.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 6, 2012 11:32 am

Yemen has long struggled as one of the least developed countries in the world. But now, after a year of protest and unrest that saw the country's longtime dictator step down, the situation for millions of Yemenis is dire.

Aid groups say some 10 million people are now without enough food to eat, and more than 200,000 children face life-threatening levels of malnutrition.

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World
2:07 am
Tue June 26, 2012

As NATO Draws Down, Afghans Fear A Brain Drain

International aid has poured into Afghanistan in recent years, but it is expected to fall sharply as NATO forces pull out. That will place great strains on the economy, and may lead skilled Afghans to leave if they can't find work. Here, street children in Kabul collect food from an aid group.
Dar Yasin AP

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 9:37 am

As NATO troops leave Afghanistan, there will also be a decline in aid money that has flooded the country over the past decade and created hundreds of thousands of jobs funded by donor money.

That means fewer jobs for Afghans, and skilled Afghans may be tempted to leave the country as part of a brain drain that could further weaken a fragile state.

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Business
2:05 am
Tue June 26, 2012

What's A Taxi Ride Worth? You Set The Price

Eric Hagen charges people only what they can afford in his Recession Ride Taxi in Burlington, Vt.
Kirk Carapezza for NPR

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 12:07 pm

In a recession, watching the meter on a taxi tick higher and higher can be distressing. But in Burlington, Vt., the Recession Ride Taxi lets customers set their own price.

Eric Hagen is a Wall Street banker-turned-cab-driver whose one-man "pay-what-you-want" taxi service has accrued dozens of faithful customers.

'I'd Be Walking'

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The Record
7:06 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Springsteen's American Dream, Beautiful And Bleak

Bruce Springsteen onstage during the Born in the USA tour in 1985.
Richard E. Aaron Redferns

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:39 pm

I fell in love with Bruce Springsteen for his swagger. It was ridiculous and offered so much hope. Here was a bony dude with the worst haircut ever, who wore T-shirts covered in holes — seriously, he looked like the fry cook at the amusement park where I worked as a counter girl in the summer — making music as big as the known universe.

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Law
12:38 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Ala. Juvenile Murderers Law Ruled Unconstitutional

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Law
12:12 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Supreme Court Makes 3 Key Rulings

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 12:37 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

It's been a busy morning at the Supreme Court. Justices released several opinions, including a ruling on Arizona's controversial immigration law aimed at cracking down on illegal immigration. That law gave police broad powers to stop suspected illegal immigrants and demand their papers, but civil rights groups said it went too far and gave states too much authority over immigration policy.

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Around the Nation
6:11 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Ugly Mugly Crowned World's Ugliest Dog

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 12:37 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Around the Nation
5:54 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Ohio Octogenarians Skydive For Charity

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 12:37 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. George H. W. Bush, the first president Bush, made news since leaving office by jumping out of airplanes. Marjorie Bryan says she'd like to join him sometime. She's 83, and on Saturday she parachuted from a plan over Lima, Ohio, as did 82-year-old Marianna Sherman. They raised money for the Blue Star Mothers, whose kids served in the military. They jumped with a retired sergeant who has accompanied the ex-president in midair. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Animals
4:55 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Famed Tortoise Dies In Galapagos Islands

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 12:37 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And we have a bit of sad news from the Galapagos Islands. The giant tortoise known as Lonesome George, believed to be the last living member of its subspecies - has died. We reported on the tortoise in 2008 when Lonesome George mated with a female from a similar species. The hope was his subspecies would be carried on. But the eggs turned out to be infertile. By tortoise standards, Lonesome George died relatively young. He was believed to be about 100 years old. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

Business
4:13 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 12:37 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with good times for bank chiefs.

While the financial world keeps grappling with losses, the industry's leaders have raked in annual pay raises averaging nearly 12 percent. The Financial Times found JPMorgan Chase's CEO Jamie Dimon was among the top earners, with a pay package of more than $23 million last year, an 11 percent increase over the previous year. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

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