Morning Edition

Weekdays, 5 a.m. - 10 a.m.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition

NPR's Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep, and KCUR's Michael Byars and Maria Carter bring the day's local and national news.

Morning Edition provides breaking news, news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary and reviews important new music, books and events in the arts.  

You can find out more about Morning Edition on NPR's website.

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Business
2:31 am
Wed July 4, 2012

Office Stress Dogging You? Try Punching In With Fido

Ginger, an English bulldog, comes to work each day with Will Pisnieski. She's one of several dogs who are regular fixtures at dog-friendly Authentic Entertainment in Burbank, Calif.
Grant Hindsley AP

Originally published on Thu July 19, 2012 3:11 pm

Most dog lovers will insist a canine friend makes for a happier home. A number of studies back that up, too, touting the health benefits of four-legged companions.

But there's new evidence that dogs can make for a better workplace as well, making employees happier and more productive.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:27 am
Wed July 4, 2012

From 'Glee' To Gettysburg: Brian Stokes Mitchell Speaks For Lincoln

Brian Stokes Mitchell records A Lincoln Portrait at NPR's Studio 4A in April.
Doriane Raiman NPR

Originally published on Wed July 4, 2012 4:08 am

Aaron Copland is considered one of America's greatest composers. Among his most famous works is a tribute to an iconic figure in American history. In 1942, Copland wrote A Lincoln Portrait, which features a full orchestra playing while a narrator reads excerpts from Lincoln's speeches and other writings.

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Sweetness And Light
9:03 pm
Tue July 3, 2012

Joe Paterno's Legacy: Protect Players At All Costs

Joe Paterno walks the sidelines during warm-ups before a game between his Penn State Nittany Lions and the Temple Owls in Philadelphia last September. Paterno, who died in January, was fired on Nov. 9, four days after Jerry Sandusky was initially arrested on charges of sexually abusing 10 boys.
Chris Szagola AP

Originally published on Wed July 4, 2012 7:39 am

It is not facetious to say that dying may not have been the worst thing to happen to Joe Paterno this past year.

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Around the Nation
6:48 am
Tue July 3, 2012

Columbus Zoo Visitors Witness Family Feud

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Visitors to the Columbus Zoo over the weekend were startled witnesses to a family feud. A fight broke out when mother elephant Phoebe was disciplining her son Beco. Another elephant, known as Aunt Connie, disapproved and the females started shoving each other. A zoo director told the Columbus Dispatch that elephants, like humans, sometimes disagree about child rearing. He also said the little elephant Beco is a punk. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

Around the Nation
6:30 am
Tue July 3, 2012

Rapper Pitbull Helps Wal-Mart Add Facebook Fans

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Wal-Mart wanted more Facebook fans, so it asked rapper Pitbull for help. Pitbull agreed to a show at the Wal-Mart store with the most likes. The campaign went viral, then rural. As of this morning, more than 40,000 people have liked the Wal-Mart in Kodiak, Alaska. Kodiak is on an island, a town of less then 10,000, plus bears, of course. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

NPR Story
5:51 am
Tue July 3, 2012

Utilites Working To Restore Power In Virginia

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

People in states from the Midwest to the Atlantic are still dealing with the damage and power outages from Friday night's derecho. That's the name for the line of storms which swept through with shearing winds and intense lightening. Chicago was among the cities hit by a second severe storm on Sunday. We'll get an update from there in a moment.

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NPR Story
3:55 am
Tue July 3, 2012

100 Meter Runoff Canceled, Tarmoh Pulls Out Of Race

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 5:36 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

The U.S. Olympic Track and Field trials soared to a start last month in Eugene, Oregon, with a world record in the decathlon. Yesterday, the trials limped to a controversial end. A planned 100 meter run-off was canceled between sprinters Allyson Felix and Jeneba Tarmoh after Tarmoh decided not to race.

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Business
3:55 am
Tue July 3, 2012

Airbus: 'The Time Is Right' To Open Alabama Plant

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 4:31 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Jobs and the economy are big issues in this election. And from Alabama, we have a story of jobs coming from overseas to the U.S. European aircraft manufacturer Airbus is making a bold move into North America to compete in the largest market in the world for passenger jets.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The firm will build its first U.S. assembly plant on the Gulf Coast in Mobile, Alabama. NPR's Debbie Elliott reports the region has been working for years to attract Airbus.

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NPR Story
3:55 am
Tue July 3, 2012

Daycare Needs Stretch Around The Clock

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 4:29 am

As more people take shift work in the still struggling economy, the need for after hours child care has increased. Throughout the country, many daycare centers have begun offering evening hours or 24-hour care. Parents say their kids should be sleeping at home at night, but they have no choice but to work when jobs are available.

NPR Story
3:55 am
Tue July 3, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 7:02 am

In France, a law just took effect that requires all drivers, including tourists, to buy a breathalyzer test to keep in their cars. Drunk driving is huge problem in France — causing more accidents per year than speeding. It was recently discovered that the head of the group that lobbied for the law also works for a company that makes the kits.

NPR Story
3:55 am
Tue July 3, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 6:53 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with another bye-bye at Barclays.

NPR Story
3:55 am
Tue July 3, 2012

Storm Leaves Illinois Residents Without Power

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 5:56 am

No power and high heat equal no fun in parts of Illinois. Some worry that July 4 celebrations will be affected.

NPR Story
3:55 am
Tue July 3, 2012

The History Of Pie

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 1:11 pm

It's Pie Week on Morning Edition, and we wanted to know more about where pie comes from. Linda Wertheimer talks to food anthropologist Deborah Duchon about the history of pie.

NPR Story
3:55 am
Tue July 3, 2012

'Game Of Thrones' Cookbook

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 2:26 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And before kicking off Pie Week, MORNING EDITION sponsored a pie contest here in the office. One of our winners was science editor Maria Godoy, who baked a medieval pork pie.

MARIA GODOY, BYLINE: It was a sweet and savory dish made of ground pork and currants, dates and honey. And then I got these dragon figurines breathing flames to sort of guard the dish.

MONTAGNE: Maria was inspired by the fantasy novel and HBO series "Game of Thrones."

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC, "GAME OF THRONES")

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Middle East
2:31 am
Tue July 3, 2012

Can Sanctions Force Iran To Change Its Policies?

Iranian workers make repairs to a unit at Tehran's oil refinery in November 2007. It's estimated that a Western oil embargo is costing Iran about $4.5 billion each month in lost revenue.
Vahid Salemi AP

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 7:17 am

Whether economic sanctions can force a government to change course is far from clear, but Iran should be a good test case.

A European Union embargo on Iranian oil took full effect this week, complementing U.S. measures that have grown much more severe in recent weeks. Other Western sanctions now in place target Iranian banks, foreign companies that provide shipping insurance for Iranian oil tankers, and foreign firms that invest in the Iranian oil industry.

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Science
2:30 am
Tue July 3, 2012

When Ice Cream Attacks: The Mystery Of Brain Freeze

NPR interns (from left) Angela Wong and Kevin Uhrmacher participate in an experiment to induce brain freeze.
Benjamin Morris NPR

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 1:12 pm

If it hasn't happened to you, count yourself as lucky. For many people, eating ice cream or drinking an icy drink too fast can produce a really painful headache. It usually hits in the front of the brain, behind the forehead.

The technical name for this phenomenon is cold-stimulus headache, but people also refer to it as "ice cream headache" or "brain freeze."

The good news is that brain freeze is easy to prevent — just eat more slowly. The other bit of good news is these headaches don't last very long — a minute at the outside.

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Space
2:28 am
Tue July 3, 2012

Fledgling NASA Nonprofit Starts To Liftoff

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 9:24 am

A new nonprofit organization that's supposed to take charge of expanding scientific research on the International Space Station has had a rocky first year but now is starting to show what it can do.

The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space just signed one agreement with a company not traditionally linked to research in space: the sporting goods company Cobra Puma Golf.

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Around the Nation
6:35 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Art Thief Returns Stolen Salvador Dali Drawing

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Around the Nation
6:23 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Daredevils Try Out Adult-Size Hot Wheels Track

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Hot Wheels and their twisty plastic tracks have long been a source of small scale thrills. But on Saturday, daredevils Tanner Foust and Greg Tracy went behind the miniature. They raced two rally cars around a 66-foot tall version of a Hot Wheels loop-de-loop racetrack. Seven times gravity was the hardest part. The only thing broken was a world record. Don't try this at home. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Analysis
6:23 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Democrats, GOP Say Health Ruling Works For Them

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

Members of Congress have left town for the Fourth of July recess, but Washington is still reacting to the Supreme Court decision upholding President Obama's health care law. Each party is looking for ways to use the decision to its advantage in the fall campaign. Going into the weekend, a Gallup poll showed voters evenly split; 46 percent said they approved of the ruling, 46 percent disapprove.

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Latin America
4:35 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Mexico's Former Ruling Party Returns To Power

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 6:23 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

In Mexico, the party that ruled for more than 70 years is claiming victory in the presidential election. According to preliminary results, the PRI, or PRI candidate, Enrique Pena Nieto, won the most votes, but the apparent runner-up is refusing to concede. NPR's Carrie Kahn has more on this from Mexico City.

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Health Care
4:23 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Advocates Worry Texas Won't Expand Medicaid

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 6:15 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In Texas, one in four people are uninsured, and the state's leadership has been vociferous in its opposition to the health-care law. Carrie Feibel, of member station KUHF in Houston, reports that despite the Supreme Court's ruling, political opposition to the Affordable Care Act remains strong. And that leaves many public-health advocates nervous about how the Lone Star State will implement the law.

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Health Care
4:21 am
Mon July 2, 2012

California Proceeds With Health Exchanges

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 6:23 am

Transcript

PAULINE BARTOLONE, BYLINE: I'm Pauline Bartolone in Sacramento.

California, unlike Mississippi, is already on the road to Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act. And after the law passed in 2010, it was the first state to get going to build an exchange.

Peter Lee is in charge of it. He never let uncertainty about the Supreme Court decision come in the way of building the new marketplace.

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Health Care
4:15 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Mississippi Reluctant To Expand Medicaid Eligibility

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 6:23 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

WERTHEIMER: Now that the Supreme Court has upheld most of the health care law, the Affordable Care Act, the action turns to the states.

Each state has two big tasks: first is deciding whether to take federal money to expand Medicaid.

MONTAGNE: States are supposed to provide Medicaid to a larger base: people making incomes up to 133 percent of the poverty level, just under $15,000 a year.

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Business
3:54 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 6:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The chairman of the big British bank Barclays stepped down this morning. This comes just days after the bank agreed to pay British and U.S. regulators a total of $450 million, a fine to settle charges that Barclays' traders and executives had manipulated a key interest rate for profit.

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Around the Nation
3:54 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Fly Fishermen Benefit From Low Stream Levels

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 6:23 am

One of Colorado's recreational industries is experiencing an early season boon because of this year's low snowpack and ever-worsening drought. Fly fishing enthusiasts are loving the low stream levels, and fly shops are filled with customers. From Aspen Public Radio, Luke Runyon reports.

World
3:54 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Expedition To Search For Amelia Earhart's Lost Plane

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 6:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Another mystery that has long eluded many is the case of the missing aviatrix. Amelia Earhart disappeared on this day 75 years ago. She was attempting to become the first woman to circumnavigate the globe in an airplane when she vanished somewhere in the South Pacific. Her disappearance has stoked speculation ever since.

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Asia
3:51 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Hong Kong Status Update

Hong Kong Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying and his wife, Regina, shake hands with supporters Sunday during a flag-raising ceremony to mark the 15th anniversary of Hong Kong's handover to China. Leung was sworn in as Hong Kong's third leader amid growing discontent with China's rule over the Asian financial center.
Kin Cheung AP

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 11:36 am

It's a pretty bad first day at work when hundreds of thousands of people march through the streets calling for your resignation. That's what happened Sunday to Hong Kong's new leader, Leung Chun-ying, who was appointed by Beijing. The huge turnout presents new problems for China amid its own difficult power transition.

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Sports
3:51 am
Mon July 2, 2012

100 Meters Runoff To Decide 3rd Place Finisher

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 6:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The 100 meters is the fastest running event in Olympic track and field. But for the last nine days, the women's 100 at the U.S. Olympic Track and Field trials in Eugene, Oregon has been stalled by a much talked about tie. Today, finally, a resolution. Sprinters Alyson Felix and Jeneba Tarmoh will race in a run-off to break their tie for third place in the 100 they first ran two Saturday's ago. First one to cross the finish line today makes the U.S. women's 100 team. NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman joins us to talk about this.

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Business
3:51 am
Mon July 2, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 6:07 am

More than 70 years ago, Samsung started as a company which sold dried fish and fruit. Now Samsung sells everything from life insurance, to hotels and chemicals. It's one of South Korea's biggest companies. And, it's still run by the same family: the Lees.

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