Up To Date

Weekdays at 11 a.m.

Up to Date focuses on pressing issues, both local and national, including politics, economics, planning and design, history and entertainment - topics that have an impact on the lives of the Greater Kansas City region.

THIS WEEK:

  • Monday: DNC Check-in with Steve Kraske / Tim Kaine's Rockhurst Classmates / Boy George
  • Tuesday: Visions of Power in Cuba / U.S. Rep. Huelskamp's Reelection Bid / Statehouse Blend
  • Wednesday: Dem Candidates for KS Senate District 5 / Local Listen
  • Thursday: TBD / Weekend To-Do List
  • Friday: KC Composers: From Cowtown to Paris of the Plains

This week, 655,000 medical records from three healthcare organizations, including one in Farmington, Missouri, were listed for sale on the "Darknet." As we hear of more and more big data breaches, what does this mean for individuals? And what’s the market for stolen health information?

Guests:

The Role Of Populism In 2016 Politics

Jun 30, 2016

Between Donald Trump and the Brexit, there is a wave of populism sweeping Western democracies this year. We explore what's behind it and who it represents. 

Guests:

  • Burdett Loomis is a political science professor at the University of Kansas. 
  • Patrick Miller is an assistant professor in political science at the University of Kansas. 

The financial ripples from Britain's decision to leave the European Union were felt  on this side of the pond, leaving plenty of Americans wondering how the departure affects their monetary plans. While many details surrounding the split remain up in the air, Up To Date's Smart Money Experts have sage advice to keep skittish savers grounded.

Guests:

There is rarely unanimous agreement among the justices of the current Supreme Court of the United States, which means that for every majority opinion written, there is a dissenting one. We look at the influence dissenting opinions can have on future Supreme Court rulings.

Guest:

  • Edward Cantu is an associate professor at University of Missouri - Kansas City, School of Law.

We all remember the Titanic, but do you remember the Cap Arcona? The German luxury liner, regarded as the greatest ship since the Titanic, suffered a fate just as horrifying.

Guest:

The rebuilding of Joplin after a devastating tornado struck in 2011 was generally applauded as a textbook example of how to take care of people when disaster hits. However, homeowners and businesses on the East Coast are still struggling in the aftermath of 2012's Hurricane Sandy. 

Guests:

Kansas City is in the running for a $500,000 prize to make the metro healthier. We were selected due to the efforts of Aim4Peace, a group that seeks to proactively reduce violent crime through its guiding philosophy — violence is a disease that spreads and contracts just like sicknesses do.

Guests:

docnyc.net

Up To Date's indie, foreign & documentary film critics' latest picks cover a lot of ground. From a 1990s dance troupe that finds confidence and acceptance while on tour, to the 1790s and a devious widow who ruffles feathers in her relentless search for a rich husband, these movies are a great excuse to sit in the dark and be transported through time.

Cynthia Haynes

Strike a Pose, unrated

Up To Date's film critics review the latest independent, foreign and documentary movies showing in area theaters.

Here's a list of the films reviewed on the program:

  • Retake
  • Strike a Pose
  • Women He's Undressed
  • The Duel
  • Free State of Jones
  • Genius
  • Dark Horse
  • Maggie's Plan
  • The Lobster
  • Love & Friendship
  • The Meddler

  The dog days of summer are just around the corner ... or maybe they’re already here. One way that kids can beat them is with a great book. Our panel of librarians were here again with their favorite titles of the summer.

Guests:

  • Debbie McLeod, retired librarian.
  • Dennis Ross, director of youth services at the Johnson County Public Library.
  • Lacie Griffin, collection development specialist at the Johnson County Public Library. 

Books:

Few things compare to the satisfaction of building something with your own hands  — making things has always been a fundamental part of what humans do. The maker movement embraces these things, and aims to put high-tech tools into everyone’s hands.

In the wake of a mass shooting, politicians, the media, witnesses, and victims alike all struggle to make sense of the events. It's easy to characterize a shooter as being mentally ill, but is it accurate? One University of Missouri researcher thinks that assessment is often wrong.

Guests:

  • Tahir Rahman studies severe mental illness and is associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Missouri School of Medicine.

Religion remains central to many lives in Kansas City, despite a continued rise in the number of people not affiliated with a particular faith. A new documentary called Beyond Belief, produced by Steve Mencher, examines how some locals are using their faith as a bridge to connect seemingly disparate communities.

While the call of a cool pool is strong during our hot Midwestern summers, staying safe in and around bodies of water is paramount. Swimming lessons for the kids is a big help, but a supervisor who knows how to respond in the event of a submersion injury could save a life.

Guests:

If you've planned a wedding lately, you know it's neither easy nor cheap, with the average wedding in the U.S. costing more than $30,000. On this edition of Up To Date, the Smart Money Experts discuss some common financial pitfalls to avoid before and after your nuptials.

  Guests:

 

Little Hatch, a.k.a. Provine Hatch, Jr., was Kansas City’s premier blues musician during a popular resurgence of the form in the 1990s. Born in Mississippi in 1921, the harmonica player, vocalist and bandleader died in 2003.

Why we're listening to him this week:

We're only about half way through 2016, but Kansas City artists haven't been wasting any time. That means area music lovers have had plenty to see and hear.

KCUR's Up To Date continues its tradition of reviewing new local music with area music critics. This time, our panel is:

Berlin Film Festival

What does it take for Thomas Wolfe to achieve greatness? Up to Date’s indie, foreign and documentary film critic Steve Walker selected a biopic that helps break the mystery of his phenomenal writing. Dive in to one of these flicks while they're still on area screens.

Genius, PG-13

“First crushes are enduring" but celebrity crushes bring “a whole new level of potency" says Dave Singleton, co-author of Crush: Writers Reflect on Love, Longing and the Lasting Power of Their First Celebrity Crush. Up to Date host Steve Kraske, along with KCUR staffers and listeners reveal their celebrity crushes and learn why they endure.

For years, political polling told us who was  likely to vote and how, but the cell phone complicated all that. With fewer people answering — or even owning — land-line numbers, polls became less reliable. A Chicago start-up is changing that tradition, and finding success.

Guest:

Keith Allison / Flickr-CC

The proud parents watched from the stands, as their little boy stepped up to the plate for the first time. Mom, nervously pressing her face into her hands. Dad, holding up his phone to record every second. So what if TV cameras were already capturing the moment from six different angles? So what if their little boy was 27 years old? They’d been to just about every one of his games—so what if this one happened to be at Kauffman Stadium?

Ah, rookies.

As presidential candidates vie for votes nationwide, we ask what one vote is really worth. And if you're voting Democrat in strongly Republican Kansas, does your ballot really matter?

Guests:

  • Burdett Loomis is a political scientist at the University of Kansas.
  • Cheyenne Davis is the field and political director for the Kansas Democratic Party
  • KCUR's Elle Moxley and Lisa Rodriguez have been reporting on elections in Kansas.

Slaughterhouses remain one of the most dangerous workplaces in this country. Harvest Public Media, a reporting collaborative based at KCUR, has been investigating the hazards meat processing workers still face. The result is a three-part series airing this week, Dangerous Jobs, Cheap Meat.

Guests:

A day after 49 people were killed in a  mass shooting at a gay club in Orlando, LGBTQ and Islamic leaders reflect on how the tragedy affects their communities. 

Guests:

  • Dustin Cates is the artistic director of the Heartland Men's Chorus.
  • Moben Mirza is the secretary of the Islamic Center of Johnson County. 
Mongrel Media

It's not just temperatures that are rising this weekend. From a controversial examination of the connections (or lack thereof) between vaccines and autism, to the absurdist drama of adults finding a mate before they literally turn into animals, Up To Date's indie, foreign, and documentary film critic Steve Walker's suggestions will get a rise out of viewers, too.

Vaxxed: From Cover-up to Catastrophe, Unrated

David Greene has reported on everything from the White House to the Arab Spring to post-Soviet Russia. It all started with his high school newspaper and a lot of help along the way. Even his wife made sacrifices for his career, but Greene says it’s paid off. Now he's co-host of NPR’s Morning Edition.

David Greene is in town for KCUR’s benefit event 'RadioActive' on June 10. Tickets are no longer available.

Dumpster-diving for materials was done out of necessity when sculptor Tom Sachs first started, but now he does it by choice. It's just one way the bricolage specialist turns almost anything into art, avoiding perfection in the process. After all, "the only advantage an artist has over industry is her fingerprints," he says.

Some seniors in Kansas benefit from programs that allow them to stay in their homes. Now, with state budget cuts, waiting lists are cropping up for those services. This, despite the harsh reality that the state saves money, and lots of it, if seniors can remain in their own residences instead of a nursing home.

Guest:

Steve Kraske caught up with Béla Fleck, who's on tour with the original Flecktones, to talk inspirations and collaborations. When it comes to music Fleck says, "It's just more interesting to explore the edges of things than it is to just sit in the center and do what's already been done."

Béla Fleck and the Flecktones perform at 7:30 p.m., June 14, in the Muriel Kauffman Theatre at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts.  

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

It may look like just another hefty tome, but Shakespeare's First Folio is a big deal. Up To Date hit the road for a live, first-hand look at one of the most valuable, and rare, literary documents in the English language.

Guests:

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