Up To Date

Weekdays at 11 a.m.

Up to Date focuses on pressing issues, both local and national, including politics, economics, planning and design, history and entertainment - topics that have an impact on the lives of the Greater Kansas City region.

  • Monday: War Photographers
  • Tuesday: The Postwar Dreamhome: The Ranch House / Statehouse Blend
  • Wednesday: Powers of Two /  The First African Americans in the Space Program /Local Listen
  • Thursday: The Economic Value of Teacher Quality / Weekend To Do List
  • Friday: Indie, Documentary, and Foreign Film Reviews 

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  In a new twist on classic horror films, a sexually transmitted  demon stalks a group of Detroit teenagers in It Follows.  This is just one of the plots our critics review in a roundup of independent, foreign, and documentary film. 

Among the other plots discussed is a young woman in the center of a love triangle, personal stories of vengeance in Argentina, and a British soldier abandoned on the streets of Belfast following a riot. 

The critics weigh in on what's good, what's bad and what's ugly. 

Films discussed during this program: 

Thunderclouds have been gathering in the skies, so you might need a few rainy day activities for your weekend. Up to Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics might have just the thing to start off your spring. 

Cynthia Haines:

  • Wild Tales
  • What We Do In The Shadows
  • Diplomacy

Steve Walker:

Indiana and Arkansas are in the news for controversial legislature aimed at protecting religious freedom. On this edition of Up To Date, the Ethics professors discuss when religious freedom infringes on other freedoms. Plus, what  responsibilities do employers and employees have when it comes to illness, mental or otherwise, in the workplace?

Guests:

Facebook/Rex Hobart & the Misery Boys

Rex Hobart and the Misery Boys have been performing traditional country music in their hometown of Kansas City and in barrooms across the country for more than 15 years.  This week’s edition of Local Listen features “Jonesin’ For Merle Haggard,” a playful song that pays tribute to several legends of country music.

David Axelrod’s theme of “change” propelled Barack Obama to the presidency. He went on to serve as the President’s Senior Advisor. Steve Kraske speaks with Axelrod about his time with the President, and his new book  Believer: My Forty Years in Politics.

Johnson County native Sonia Nazario won a Pulitzer Prize for her series in the LA Times chronicling one Honduran teen's journey to the United States to find his mother.  On this edition of Up To Date, Steve Kraske speaks with Nazario about the risks she took to get the story, and the ongoing struggle of immigrants and families in Central America. 

The Library of Congress

The name Boston Corbett might not ring a bell, but his claim to fame — killing John Wilkes Booth — was only one of many events in the man’s bizarre life.

After he shot Lincoln’s killer (through the slats of a burning tobacco barn), Corbett's winding path brought him to Kansas, where he lived until his death.

These events are chronicled by historian Scott Martelle, who has just published The Madman and the Assassin: The Strange Life of Boston Corbett, the man who killed John Wilkes Booth, the first full-length biography of Corbett.

Democrat Kansas Rep. Dennis "Boog" Highberger from Lawrence, provides an insider perspective on the historic 2015 legislative session underway in Topeka. 

Guests:

The name Boston Corbett may not ring a bell, but the man who killed John Wilkes Booth led a life filled with strange and unbelievable events.  Meet the madman who spent the final years of his life in Kansas. 

Guest:

New York City’s waterfront was once a place of abandoned buildings and industry. Today it’s a vibrant community with housing for a variety of incomes. We talk with one of the urban designers behind the reshaped neighborhoods and learn how Kansas City can apply similar ideas to its riverfront. 

Guest:

Since 2007, the number of children in need of foster care in Jackson County has nearly doubled. We speak with Denise Cross, President and CEO of Cornerstones of Care, about what accounts for the increase of need in the area. We also examine how the community is accommodating and caring for children in need of a home.

For more information on becoming a foster parent, you can call Cornerstones of Care toll-free 855-778-5437 or visit www.healthyfamilies4kids.org.

For many, the goal after living through trauma is to get back to normal. On this edition of Up To Date, guest host Brian Ellison speaks with two authors who tell stories of people who not only survive tragedy, but thrive in the aftermath. 

Guests:

Local Listen: Danielle Nicole

Mar 27, 2015
www.daniellenicolekc.com

  

Danielle Nicole Schnebelen went right to work following the recent breakup of the popular Kansas City blues-rock band Trampled Under Foot.  Schnebelen’s new solo EP showcases her powerful voice.  This week’s edition of Local Listen features “Wandering Heart,” a track from the self-titled release. 

Danielle Nicole Schnebelen headlines a homecoming concert at Knuckleheads on Saturday, March 28.

Kansas City’s Steve Metzler was a business leader, a nonprofit supporter, and a patron of the arts, but phrases don’t begin to describe the impact he had on the community.

On this edition of Up To Date guest host Brian Ellison shares memories with those whose lives were touched by Metzler and talks with Steve's long-time partner, Brian Williams. 

Technology is finding it's way into every part of our lives, and it may be in our roads sooner than we think. One Kansas City engineer is proposing a smart I-70 that could charge electric cars by contact, connect to navigation systems, and more. 

Guests:

If you've got spring fever and want to get out of the house this weekend, Up to Date's indie, foreign, and documentary film critics have a few suggestions of what you can see.

Cynthia Haines:

  • What We Do In The Shadows
  • Wild Tales
  • Diplomacy

Steve Walker:

Courtesy Photo / Paula Rose

Gender representation at Wikipedia is well-documented. Studies conducted by the Wikimedia Foundation (which serves as Wikipedia’s support structure) conclude that less than 15 percent of the popular online encyclopedia’s contributors are female.

According to Siko Bouterse, director of community resources at the Wikimedia Foundation, diversity among editors is vitally important to Wikipedia’s vision.

“Our vision for Wikipedia is ‘the sum of all human knowledge,’” she says. “We need everyone to contribute to that. The encyclopedia is incomplete without that.”

The lack of female editors has significant repercussions on the encyclopedia’s content. Pages on women’s health, women’s issues, and famous women artists tend to be mere paragraphs long, or as Wikipedians say, “stubs,” if they even exist at all.

Financial transitioning is a challenge whether you're entering the workforce for the first time or planning your retirement. On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with Certified Financial Planners about planning, budgeting, saving and spending at the beginning and end of your working life. 

Guests:

Wikipedia’s gender trouble is well-documented. Research by the Wikimedia Foundation determined that less than 15% of its contributors identify as female, which creates a great disparity in the popular online encyclopedia's content. We discuss what organizations in Kansas City and around the world are doing to fix this problem.

Guests:

Sexual assault on college campuses is getting new attention these days as societal attitudes change regarding this issue. On this edition of Up To Date, Steve Kraske speaks with two local Title IX officials about how they educate students and faculty, and investigate sexual assault allegations.

Guests:

Kansas and Missouri, among other states, are pushing a bill calling for a national constitutional convention —the first since the original convention in 1787. Steve Kraske discusses the issues surrounding this call to action, and why supporters feel they can succeed when 750 other attempts have failed.

Guests:

  • Burdett Loomis is a political science professor at the University of Kansas.
  • Rep. John Rubin (R) represents Shawnee, Kansas, and supports the bill calling for a constitutional convention.

Kansas City producer Jim McCullough is fulfilling a dream to create a Sci-fi show filmed in his hometown. Paradox City takes place in a world where superheroes can't use their powers and everyone lives in a giant fortress that hovers above ground. On this edition of Up To Date, McCullough explains his team's method of crowd funding the pilot episode by breaking it into short webisodes to be released as each dollar goal is achieved. 

In order to become a naturalized citizen, immigrants must pass a basic U.S. civics test. Some Missouri lawmakers are pushing for the state to adopt education policies that would require high schoolers to pass the same test to graduate. On this edition of Up To Date, Steve Kraske talks with two lawmakers supporting this requirement, and quizzes listeners with questions from the U.S. Citizenship Civics Test.

Guests:

Spring has sprung, and if you feel like springing for movie tickets this weekend, our indie, foreign and documentary film critics have a few ideas for you.

Cynthia Haines:

  • What We Do In The Shadows
  • Diplomacy
  • Red Army

Steve Walker:

  • Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalam
  • '71
  • Diplomacy
Beth Lipoff / KCUR

Long-haired peace-loving hippies promoting ideas of free love are the foundation of the ground-breaking 1967 musical "Hair".

On Friday's Up to Date, we talk with two of the Broadway cast members about their experiences on stage, what the show means to them and why they're taking part in a new retrospective production at the Kansas City Repertory Theatre.

When it comes to internet crime, criminals are far ahead of law enforcement and the general public. As more and more hacks make headlines, we talk about our vulnerability as individuals and how to protect ourselves from a cyber attack.

David Stonner / Missouri Department of Conservation

The Missouri Department of Conservation has long been the envy of the nation, as far as conservation departments go.

Since the mid-1970s, it has been solely funded by a ⅛ cent conservation sales tax. Because it does not receive any general revenue from the government, it naturally operates without much oversight.

Until now, the model hasn’t presented much of a problem. In fact, Missouri's has been touted as one of the best conservation departments in the country.

But one Missouri representative thinks the current model is flawed. Rep. Craig Redmon, the Republican Chair of the Conservation Appropriation Committee, thinks the current funding mechanism is vulnerable.

Redmon wrote a bill calling for the repeal of the ⅛ cent conservation sales tax — a bill he doesn't actually support.

Human's scientific knowledge reaches far and wide, particularly when it comes to the Earth's surface, but we are just beginning the exploration of Earth's deepest reaches, the oceans.  On this edition of Up to Date, we talk with oceanographer, Dr. David Gallo, about new discoveries and how the vastness of the oceans makes it difficult to discover the largest things we lose, like airplanes. 

In May 1915, a German U-boat sunk one of the world's greatest ocean liners, the Lusitania. Erik Larson's new book, Dead Wake: the Last Crossing of the Lusitania, maps the tale known to many as the event that launched America into the Great War. On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with Erik Larson about his research process, the captains behind the ships involved, and the mystery of Room 40.

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