What It's Like To Be A Religious Minority In America

Feb 27, 2014

Many politicians declare the United States to be a Christian nation-- but it’s not, even though the majority of the population is part of some stream of Christianity. The Founding Fathers, while using religion as a basis for some of their decisions, were very clear about making this a country with no official religion.

Steve Kraske examines America's religious melting pot on Thursday's Up to Date.
Steve Kraske examines America's religious melting pot on Thursday's Up to Date.
Credit 917press / Flickr-CC

But these days, if you belong to a different faith, how does that work for you in a Christian-majority nation? On Thursday's Up to Date, we talk about the issues religious minorities, such as Jews and Muslims, face in America.

Guests:

  • Charles Cohen, professor at the University of Wisconsin and director of the Labor Institute for Study of the Abrahamic Religions
  • Rabbi Mark H. Levin, leader of Congregation Beth Torah in Overland Park
  • Mahnaz Shabbir, president of her management consulting company Shabbir Advisors and active member of not-for-profit boards such as the Crescent Peace Society

HEAR MORE: Charles Cohen speaks at 6:30 p.m., Feb. 27, at the Kansas City Public Library’s Plaza Branch. Tickets are free.