March 11, 2012
10:51 am
Mon March 12, 2012

Urban Lit, Troost Corridor, The Good Foot

Coming up on KC Currents, Sunday, March 11 at 5pm, with a repeat Monday at 8pm:

The Good Foot: A New Take On Vintage Soul

One of Kansas City's up and coming bands isn’t jazz, rock or country. Their audience isn’t young or old, black or white but a pretty diverse mix. And they just now started writing their own songs. The Good Foot is a 7-piece soul cover band, and they want to get you moving.

Provocative Urban Lit Attracts Teen Audiences

In recent years, there’s been a renaissance of books about tough, inner-city life which are popular with teen audiences. The genre has been called urban fiction, hip-hop fiction or ghetto lit, and it’s often filled with profanity, sex, violence and illegal activity. While the genre seems to keep a technology-saturated generation reading, the content of these books is troubling to a lot of parents and teachers.

Residents Voice Hopes And Concerns For Troost Corridor

Urban planners have just received their first assessment of what people who live and work in the Troost Corridor want from a multi-year makeover on a grand scale.  KCUR's Dan Verbeck reports that more than 350 people listed concerns and hopes.

How Fast Food Found A Home In One Hospital

Truman Medical Center's CEO John Bluford has been waging a wellness campaign, promoting better nutrition and advising against eating junk food. So…what’s a McDonald's doing right inside a main hospital entrance?

Mediation Can Help Farmers Settle Disputes

When farmers are facing foreclosure or bankruptcy, their options can seem limited, or downright intimidating. But that’s not always the case. Mediation services may offer a more cost–effective and less stressful route compared with an expensive legal trek through the courts.

Opera Explores Tensions And Symbolism In Nixon's Visit To China

It’s hard today to conjure up a time when the United States and China...didn’t have trade relations...or communicate at all.  But in 1972, President Richard Nixon’s visit to China, a once-demonized Communist regime, was heralded as “the week that changed the world.” A new production of the opera, Nixon in China, explores the tensions and symbolism of that visit.

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