Steve Kraske

Host of Up to Date

Steve Kraske is an associate teaching professor of journalism at UMKC and has hosted "Up to Date" since 2002. He worked as political correspondent for The Kansas City Star from 1994-2013 covering national, state and local campaigns. He also has covered the statehouses in Topeka and Jefferson City. From 2013-2016, he was a part-time columnist for The Star; he now serves on the newspaper's editorial board.

Before arriving in Kansas City, he worked at daily newspapers in Iowa and Illinois and at United Press International in Madison, Wisconsin. Kraske is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he received a bachelor's degree in journalism. He was a 1992 John S. Knight Journalism Fellow at Stanford University.

Kraske has won awards for both his print and radio work and has appeared on NPR, CNN and Fox. He's a big fan of "Prairie Home Companion" and Kansas City jazz. His father lives in Stillwater, Minn., not far from the St. Croix River.

Will O'Neill / Flickr - CC

Today we ask the Ethics Professors which services the government is (and is not) morally obligated to provide its citizens. Health care? Education? A good-paying job? Then, KCUR's Sam Zeff fills us in on a Kansas Supreme Court ruling with major implications for education funding and equity.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Kansas City, Kansas, Mayor Mark Holland speaks with host Steve Kraske about the State of the Government Address he presented on February 28, noting the progress made in Wyandotte County, and what more needs to be done. Also, our Political Pundits examine President Trump's first address to a joint session of Congress.

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In such a divided era in America, is respect for different faiths critical to the country's success? A former member of President Obama's Faith Advisory Council answers that question. Then, trout season begins on March 1 and there's no better place in Missouri to ring it in than Bennett Spring State Park, outside Lebanon.

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Whether or not you enjoy your career, you likely plan on permanently leaving the workforce at some point. With longer life expectancy rates, and shrinking stability in government pension programs, hopeful retirees are right to be concerned about the financial viability of doing so. Today, Up To Date's Smart Money Experts detail pragmatic planning tactics and crisis control for those currently in danger of outliving their assets.

Netflix

First, we discuss Wednesday's deadly shooting that killed one man and injured two others in an Olathe bar.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Every major advancement of African-Americans since the Civil War has been met and opposed by "white rage," says Carol Anderson. Today, she explains how resentful whites have looked to halt the progress of blacks through discriminatory policies, laws, intimidation and violence.

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For parents who have a picky eater in the house, mealtime can feel like a battle. Today, we get tips from health professionals — and from listeners with front-line experience — for encouraging good routines in the kitchen and at the table. We'll also explore ways to get your kids interested and involved in preparing the food they eat.

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For the 3rd year in a row, Abraham Lincoln topped C-SPAN's presidential leadership survey. On Presidents Day (more accurately known as Washington's Birthday), we explore the struggle over emancipation and the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment.

Helene C. Stikkel / U.S. Department of Defense

As  the first woman to represent Kansas in the U.S. Senate, Nancy Kassebaum Baker is a political legend. Today she shares her thoughts on the current state of the Republican Party, locally and nationally. Also, tracing one's lineage is popular, but it remains challenging for descendants of slaves. A genealogist explains the common challenges that can arise, and offers professional advice to ease the journey.

Robert Wright / Wikimedia Commons

Has a piece of art ever left you scratching your head? Today, we find out what goes through the mind of postmodern master David Salle when he's perusing a painting or sculpture. Here's a hint: He's focused more on his feelings about the art, than about what the art is trying to accomplish.

Ken Doll / Kansas Center for Economic Growth

The Sunflower State's budget is a mess and lawmakers in Topeka are struggling to solve the state's fiscal woes. Today, a former budget director evaluates the precarious situation. Also, we speak with novelist Ellen Hopkins, who experienced the kidnapping of one daughter and the drug addiction of another.

Marco Silva / BBC World Service

How are the first few weeks of the Trump administration affecting Kansas City? On this international edition of Up To Date, host Steve Kraske is joined by the BBC's Shaimaa Khalil to hear what callers are thinking about President Trump's executive orders concerning an immigration ban and repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

Professional Bull Riders (PBR)

Kansas City's microloan program has surpassed the $3-million mark. The funding focuses on business start-ups and expansion as explained by the lender involved and an entrepreneur who has benefited from one. Then, two of the top 45 international bull riders are Missouri-natives. Hear about their climb to the professional world and the techniques they use during those dangerous 8 seconds atop a bucking beast.

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The president's lambasting of certain outlets as "fake news" has strained relations between the executive branch and the Fourth Estate. Today, the Media Critics discuss whether or not the journalism playbook should be rewritten to cover an unprecedented administration.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

When Donald Trump declared his presidential candidacy, few guessed he stood a real chance. The now-president's longtime friend and former adviser Roger Stone thought otherwise. Today, he shares his insight. Then, we learn about the evolution of Kris Kobach's voter Crosscheck program and the story of how one Kansan got caught up in it.

Fort Osage CTC

First, we explore how vocational and technical education programs can help bridge the gap between job-seekers and middle-skilled jobs. Then, architect John Ruble explains the challenges urban planners face when designing everything from city buildings to U.S. embassies. Finally, running a successful food truck is about more than serving sliders from a van. We hear about the construction and operation of Kansas City's full-service kitchens-on-wheels.

Penguin Random House

Valentine's Day is next week, and it can be either the greatest or the worst holiday of the year. Today, we get some perspective on the nature of romantic love, and try to reconcile two different ways of thinking about it. Then, Sue Klebold recollects the morning her son, Dylan, and Eric Harris opened fire at Columbine High School. She speaks of the aftermath of the shooting, and her advocacy for mental health and suicide prevention.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

That '70s Show made way for rising stars like Mila Kunis and Ashton Kutcher, but they were supported by a corps of veteran actors. Today, we speak with Debra Jo Rupp, who spent 17 years acting on stage before portraying the quirky mom on the long-running sitcom. After that, we try to help would-be gamblers avoid a super blow-out with a preview of the Super Bowl and an explainer on how point-spread betting could work for or against you.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

These days political news provides plenty of fodder for Up To Date's Ethics Professors. Today, we ask them if it's okay for protestors to break the law for a cause. They also discuss whether Senate Democrats would be justified in stonewalling President Trump's new Supreme Court nominee, the same way Republicans refused to recognize President Obama's.

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

The relationship between schools and the communities to which they belong is crucial.

lidiasitaly.com

Chef Lidia Bastianich has been bringing Italian food to public television viewers since 1998. Now, she's bringing the tastes of Carnevale di Venezia to her Kansas City restaurant. Then, President Trump's executive order suspending entry of refugees and citizens from seven predominately-Muslim countries has been met with controversy.

Shawn Semmler / Flickr - CC

Increasing violence in Kansas City has gotten a lot of attention, leading one church to sponsor a forum where community members can workshop ideas to solve the problem. We'll preview that discussion. Then, we find out how the presence of a Fortune 500 company in Ferguson, Missouri, illustrates a history of fiscal imbalance and racial capitalism.

Universal Pictures

How many times has terrible science kept you from enjoying a sci-fi movie? From hits like I Am Legend to the classic Soylent Green, we explore the science behind these (and other) movies, and how they relate to real life.

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Attracting and hanging on to new residents can be a challenge for cities. Today, a November 2016 town hall with urban studies theorist Richard Florida and "suburbanist" Joel Kotkin, on the best of both worlds in the greater KC area.

Courtesy Through A Glass Productions

The Kansas City Symphony has released an album of music it commissioned from one of America's most promising composers. We learn about that collaboration, and about the composer's creative process. Then, Langston Hughes lived in Lawrence until just after high school, but still managed to leave a legacy of activism there.

Jvikings1 / Wikimedia Commons

After success in the state House of Representatives last Thursday, a right-to-work bill is front and center today in the Missouri Senate. We look at the pros and cons of forcing workers in unionized companies to pay union fees. Then, we learn about one Good Samaritan's efforts to reduce a rash of break-ins in Hyde Park.

Paramount Pictures

First, we take a moment to remember Royals starting pitcher Yordano Ventura, who died in a car crash this weekend. Then, Up To Date's independent, foreign and documentary film critics provide their insight on which movies from the past year may (or may not) get an Oscar-nomination nod.

NPR

In conjunction with NPR's A Nation Engaged, we're asking people from across the region what they want the new president to know about themselves and their communities. Then, we preview an upcoming Conversation at the Square about the relationship between education and neighborhoods.

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Do moderates even exist in today's bifurcated political landscape? Today, we examine the ideals of centrism and learn about some of history's notable moderates. Then, we celebrate National Winnie the Pooh Day by remembering the morale-boosting bear of World War I who inspired the world-famous cartoon character.

Colby Ellis / Flickr - CC

Football can be pretty violent. Today, two local physicians discuss whether school boards should continue to support contact sports for high-schoolers. Then, get tips on crafting an apology that will avoid making a bad situation worse.

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