Steve Kraske | KCUR

Steve Kraske

Host of Up to Date

Steve Kraske is an associate teaching professor of journalism at UMKC and has hosted "Up to Date" since 2002. He worked as political correspondent for The Kansas City Star from 1994-2013 covering national, state and local campaigns. He also has covered the statehouses in Topeka and Jefferson City. From 2013-2016, he was a part-time columnist for The Star; he now serves on the newspaper's editorial board.

Before arriving in Kansas City, he worked at daily newspapers in Iowa and Illinois and at United Press International in Madison, Wisconsin. Kraske is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he received a bachelor's degree in journalism. He was a 1992 John S. Knight Journalism Fellow at Stanford University.

Kraske has won awards for both his print and radio work and has appeared on NPR, CNN and Fox. He's a big fan of "Prairie Home Companion" and Kansas City jazz. His father lives in Stillwater, Minn., not far from the St. Croix River.

Ways to Connect

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Our panel of financial planners explain healthy spending routines and investing in stocks

As we inch closer to the April 15 deadline, you may be putting off filing your tax returns for as long as possible. Our Smart Money experts advise otherwise. Today, they outlined what you can do to leave fiscal irresponsibility in your past, and how you can invest wisely in the stock market.

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Segment 1: Kansas City playwright uses murders of Leon Jordan and James Townsend as inspiration to connect 1960s civil rights movements to today's.

In the long history of Kansas City's Green Duck Lounge, two of its owners, both considered icons in the community, were each was shot dead, one in 1970 and the other in 2015. The murders are the basis for a new work, which couples the civil rights activities of the 60s to those of today.

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Segment 1: How Missouri schools prepare for an active shooter situation.

In the wake of Wednesday's mass shooting in Parkland, Florida, the 18th shooting at a school in 2018, we found out what Missouri requires for its schools to be ready to deal with similar situations. We also asked how parents can discuss these tragedies with their children before, during and after they occur.

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Segment 1: How a redrawn border influences modern Mexican-American identity

When the U.S.-Mexico border moved at the end of the Mexican-American War, more than 100,000 Mexicans suddenly found themselves living on U.S. territory. Today, we considered how this history, more than 100 years in the making, impacts modern race relations.

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Segment 1: Kansas' Third-Biggest School District Picks A New Leader

After a months-long hiring process, the Shawnee Mission School District Board of Education has decided on a new superintendent. We heard about the move, and about the future of one of the largest districts in Kansas and the metro.

Segment 1: How Voting Districts Have Shaped Representation in Missouri

The term "gerrymandering" has flooded headlines recently. But how does it influence Missouri's legislature? We discussed the history of partisan districting, how it impacts state and national government differently, and what might be done to improve the redistricting process.

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Caroline Fraser's biography of beloved children's author Laura Ingalls Wilder reveals a life that "was harder and grittier" than the one portrayed in the Little House books. Today, Fraser explains how she was able to piece together Laura's life beyond the books, including the often contentious relationship with her daughter, the journalist Rose Wilder Lane.

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Your might think combining jazz and a symphony would like trying to mix oil and water — they don't just go together. Yet jazz artists, including Kansas City's own Charlie Parker, have combined their playing with those of an orchestra to great results.

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You'd be forgiven for thinking a jazz club with a throwback feel would end up being a flop. You'd also be wrong. Today, we meet a local entrepreneur whose pair of nightclubs is helping the Kansas City jazz scene live on. Then, we listen to some of your favorite TV theme songs from the 1950s to today, and try to discover why the best of them stick so easily in your head. Sorry in advance for the earworms!

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Despite the raucous Republican reception Pres. Trump's State of the Union received, Kansas City's Rep. Emanuel Cleaver thinks the commander-in-chief missed an opportunity with his speech. Today, he shares his theory on why GOP members in Congress are eager to be seen supporting the president. Then, we get the latest word on the rainbow trout, zebra mussels, and Eastern spotted skunks that the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism is keeping an eye on.

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While Kansas City has a long tradition of black artists, their work tends to get overlooked, says textiles artist Sonié Joi Thompson-Ruffin. Today, we learn about a community project that's giving these local creatives online posterity. Then, we hear excerpts from a conversation with Democratic Missouri Rep.

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High school students aren't necessarily known for taking a thoughtful approach to complicated moral dilemmas, but that characterization may be unfair and outdated. Today, we learn about the competitive extracurricular activity taking place in two Johnson County, Kansas. schools that promotes civil discourse and a careful consideration of all viewpoints. Then, we get the Missouri Budget Project's perspective on Gov.

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For frequent listeners of NPR, there's no mistaking Wade Goodwyn's voice. Today, we sit down with the Dallas-based reporter and discuss his decades of experience reporting on national issues with a story-telling perspective. Then, we meet Pip Utton, whose one-man shows feature important leaders you might have heard of.

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At the turn of the 20th century, two sisters who were determined to provide medical care to Kansas City's underserved kids founded what became a local institution. Today, we learn about the women behind Children's Mercy Hospital. Then, jazz vocalist Deborah Brown reflects on her Kansas City roots and a music career that's led her around the world.

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Over the last 12 months, we've had any number of pollsters, pundits and politicos on the program to discuss Pres. Donald Trump's words and actions.

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It took Sandra Allen a few years but when she finally read the 60-page autobiographical manuscript her paranoid schizophrenic uncle Bob sent her, she found a lens into his creative, curious and sometimes discombobulating mind. Today, Allen reflects on what her uncle's life reveals about mental health in America.

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For a town of barely more than 3,400 residents, Norwich, Vermont, produces a lot of Olympians. Today, sports reporter Karen Crouse tells us about the town's mindset and lifestyle that, since 1984, has put an athlete on every U.S. Winter Olympic team except one (and sent two athletes to the summer games for good measure).

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"There are a lot of dangers during the winter, especially when we're hitting temperatures around zero," says veterinarian Wayne Hunthausen. Today, the pet behavior expert answers our burning questions about cold weather pet safety and how to avoid dangers like antifreeze, frostbite and melting salt. Then, we learn about "gaslighting," particularly as it relates to politics and the current #MeToo movement.

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Pre-Oscars movie-going crunch-time is upon us and what better way to get prepped for it, than a sit-down-and-chat with Up To Date's Film Critics? They'll review what's showing now on area screens, including Call Me By Your Name, Phantom Thread, Small Town Crime, Proud Mary, The Post, I, Tonya, and Darkest Hour.

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It may not seem like a health issue at first but Dr. Vivek Murthy, the 19th Surgeon General of the United States (and first person of Indian descent to hold the post), is very concerned about what he calls a 'loneliness epidemic.' Today, we dig into why he thinks tackling it is one of the most important things society can do.

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A particularly severe flu season is a good reason to refresh our series on children's health and development. In this latest installment, we get advice from metro medical experts for keeping yourself and your loved ones healthy through the winter.

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When jazz legend Branford Marsalis calls you "the greatest American musician that no one's ever heard of," you're doing something right (even if your P.R. may need a little work). Today, we meet that musician, Marcus Roberts, and learn about his remarkable life.

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On this holiday commemorating Martin Luther King Jr., Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Leonard Pitts Jr. offers his thoughts on the slain civil rights leader, and critiques President Donald Trump's recent tributes to Dr. King and Rosa Parks.

Kansas City's music scene has a long tradition of hardworking artists who turn out great, original songs. Last year was no different. Today, Playlistplay.com co-creater Savanna Howland, Judy Mills of Mills Record Company, and KCUR contributor Bill Brownlee offer a sampling of their favorite 2017 releases from Kansas City and around the world.

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A story overnight from KMOV revealing a pre-candidacy affair by Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens overshadowed his State of the State Address, given just hours earlier. Included in the story was an allegation against the governor of blackmail. State lawmakers and political reporters recap the reports, and discuss how they could affect the Greitens' administration and the General Assembly. Then, a number of U.S. cities vowed to continue to fight climate change in the wake of Pres.

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If you're native to, say, the deserts of  North Africa, a winter in Kansas City can be a shock to your system. You can combat the cold with layers of warm clothing, by turning up the thermostat or having a hot drink, but what if you're not human and your home is the Kansas City Zoo? We learn what it takes to keep the nesh occupants happy and healthy in the coldest weather.  Then, in the wake of Gov.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

When you think of a relaxing retirement, you don't normally consider hiking more than 2,000 miles. But you are not Deb Vacek, who took on the Appalachian Trail after leaving the professional world. Today, we meet the Kansas City adventurer.

Teenagers And The #MeToo Movement

Jan 8, 2018
Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

From newsrooms to the U.S. Capitol to the stage at the Golden Globes, people are drawing back the curtain on an issue that has plagued our workplaces, homes and schools for years. Today, psychologist Wes Crenshaw returns with a panel of young women to talk about this very issue: sexual assault and harassment. They give us their take on what's going on in the #MeToo movement right now, and let us know why this issue is still especially relevant for people their age.

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For a lot of journalists, 2017 was all about keeping up. A faster and faster news cycle demands more speed and more accuracy, and media consumers have never been more skeptical. Today, the Media Critics discuss how journalists have covered the big stories of the last year, and why mistrust is so common among audiences.

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Before reaching for a bottle of red or white from California, Italy or France, you might think again about shopping a little more close-to-home. Today, Master Sommelier Doug Frost returns to give us the low-down on the award-winning local vino that deserves your attention, and which bottles are garnering attention from winemakers around the country.

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