Steve Kraske

Host of Up to Date

Steve Kraske is an associate teaching professor of journalism at UMKC, a political columnist for The Kansas City Star and has hosted "Up to Date" since 2002. He worked as the full-time political correspondent for The Star from 1994-2013 covering national, state and local campaigns. He also has covered the statehouses in Topeka and Jefferson City.

Before arriving in Kansas City, he worked at daily newspapers in Iowa and Illinois and at United Press International in Madison, Wis. Kraske is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he received a bachelor's degree in journalism. He was a 1992 John S. Knight Journalism Fellow at Stanford University.

Kraske has won awards for both his print and radio work and has appeared on NPR, CNN and Fox. He's a big fan of "Prairie Home Companion" and Kansas City jazz. His father lives in Stillwater, Minn., not far from the St. Croix River.

New York City’s waterfront was once a place of abandoned buildings and industry. Today it’s a vibrant community with housing for a variety of incomes. We talk with one of the urban designers behind the reshaped neighborhoods and learn how Kansas City can apply similar ideas to its riverfront. 

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Financial transitioning is a challenge whether you're entering the workforce for the first time or planning your retirement. On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with Certified Financial Planners about planning, budgeting, saving and spending at the beginning and end of your working life. 

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Wikipedia’s gender trouble is well-documented. Research by the Wikimedia Foundation determined that less than 15% of its contributors identify as female, which creates a great disparity in the popular online encyclopedia's content. We discuss what organizations in Kansas City and around the world are doing to fix this problem.

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Sexual assault on college campuses is getting new attention these days as societal attitudes change regarding this issue. On this edition of Up To Date, Steve Kraske speaks with two local Title IX officials about how they educate students and faculty, and investigate sexual assault allegations.

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Kansas and Missouri, among other states, are pushing a bill calling for a national constitutional convention —the first since the original convention in 1787. Steve Kraske discusses the issues surrounding this call to action, and why supporters feel they can succeed when 750 other attempts have failed.

Guests:

  • Burdett Loomis is a political science professor at the University of Kansas.
  • Rep. John Rubin (R) represents Shawnee, Kansas, and supports the bill calling for a constitutional convention.

Kansas City producer Jim McCullough is fulfilling a dream to create a Sci-fi show filmed in his hometown. Paradox City takes place in a world where superheroes can't use their powers and everyone lives in a giant fortress that hovers above ground. On this edition of Up To Date, McCullough explains his team's method of crowd funding the pilot episode by breaking it into short webisodes to be released as each dollar goal is achieved. 

In order to become a naturalized citizen, immigrants must pass a basic U.S. civics test. Some Missouri lawmakers are pushing for the state to adopt education policies that would require high schoolers to pass the same test to graduate. On this edition of Up To Date, Steve Kraske talks with two lawmakers supporting this requirement, and quizzes listeners with questions from the U.S. Citizenship Civics Test.

Guests:

Beth Lipoff / KCUR

Long-haired peace-loving hippies promoting ideas of free love are the foundation of the ground-breaking 1967 musical "Hair".

On Friday's Up to Date, we talk with two of the Broadway cast members about their experiences on stage, what the show means to them and why they're taking part in a new retrospective production at the Kansas City Repertory Theatre.

When it comes to internet crime, criminals are far ahead of law enforcement and the general public. As more and more hacks make headlines, we talk about our vulnerability as individuals and how to protect ourselves from a cyber attack.

When you listen to the latest soulful reggae from The New Riddim you could easily believe it was created in Jamaica in the 1970s. Yet the Kansas City band’s “Second Sight” was, in fact, recorded locally.

This week’s edition of Local Listen features their song “Shoot the Piano Player.”

You catch them Friday, March 20, at Davey's Uptown Ramblers Club on Main and 34th in Kansas City, Mo. Doors open at 9. 

Human's scientific knowledge reaches far and wide, particularly when it comes to the Earth's surface, but we are just beginning the exploration of Earth's deepest reaches, the oceans.  On this edition of Up to Date, we talk with oceanographer, Dr. David Gallo, about new discoveries and how the vastness of the oceans makes it difficult to discover the largest things we lose, like airplanes. 

In May 1915, a German U-boat sunk one of the world's greatest ocean liners, the Lusitania. Erik Larson's new book, Dead Wake: the Last Crossing of the Lusitania, maps the tale known to many as the event that launched America into the Great War. On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with Erik Larson about his research process, the captains behind the ships involved, and the mystery of Room 40.

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The oldest culture on the planet, Aboriginals have inhabited the Australian continent for more than 50,000 years. National Geographic photographer  Amy Toensing spent three years documenting their lives and captured how their ancient tradition lives on in the modern world. 

Hear More: Amy Toensing speaks Tuesday, March 17 at 7:30 at the Muriel Kauffman Theatre. For information and tickets, click here.

The "selfie culture" is changing how young people see themselves, express themselves, and communicate. But sometimes, that expression can lead to trouble. We explore the darker side of the "selfie culture" and what parents need to know about it. 

Guests: 

  • Wes Crenshaw is a psychologist board certified in couples and family psychology.
  • Kyra Haas is a senior at Lawrence Free State High School and co-author of the Double Take advice column in the Lawrence Journal-World.

Violence in the urban core is all too familiar for Missouri. A recently released study from 2012 puts Missouri at the top of the list for inner city homicide. Steve Kraske asks why, and looks at what's being done locally to curb violent crime. 

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James Madison is an oft-forgotten American President, but his ability to build relationships laid the foundation for the America we know today. On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with historian David Stewart about the life and contributions of America's fourth president. 

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  A certain breed of specialist is called in when someone is trapped, missing, or feared dead. These specialists are search and rescue dogs. On this edition of Up To Date,  a look that the lives of these canines and their powerful noses.

Guests:

  • Cat Warren is the author of What the Dog Knows: Scent, Science, and the Amazing Ways Dogs Perceive the World.
  • Mark Kramer is the deputy director of Kansas Search and Rescue, Northern Region. 

When it comes to strategies of how to deal with a shooter in the building, the only options teachers used to have were locking the doors or evacuating. These days schools have another choice when dealing with an active shooter...fighting back. A new active shooter simulation program from the Missouri Center for Education Safety gives teachers a hands-on experience in thwarting a potential attacker. 

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Prison chaplains provide service for many souls, but what happens when your congregation is made up of the men who served under Adolf Hitler? The book Mission at Nuremberg: An American Army Chaplain and the Trial of the Nazis pieces together the life of Henry Gerecke, the U.S. Army chaplain given one of the most controversial assignments following World War II.  Guest

  • Tim Townsend​, editor at Timeline and author of Mission at Nuremberg: An American Army Chaplain and the Trial of the Nazis

 

For clergy, providing spiritual support in mental institutions can be difficult especially when some members of your congregation may not even be aware of who you are. On this edition of Up To Date, we talk to the chaplain at Osawatomie State Hospital on the challenges of ministering to the mentally ill. 

Guest:

  • Rev. Jeffrey Yelton is the psychiatric chaplain at Osawatomie State Hospital in Kansas.

Local Listen: Millie Edwards

Mar 6, 2015
Facebook / Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame

Millie Edwards may be one of the smallest members of KC’s jazz community, but she owns one of the biggest voices on the scene. This week’s Local Listen features her collaboration with pianist Mike Pagán on the Duke Ellington composition “In a Mellow Tone.”

HEAR MORE: Edwards entertains every Monday at The Phoenix. On Sunday, March 8, she’ll be featured in a KC Jazz Vespers concert at the First Baptist Church of Kansas City. Admission is free.

  Though he is typically placed in the jazz category, guitarist Bill Frisell plays a wide variety of styles, including folk and Americana. On this edition of Up To Date, he chats with Steve Kraske about his beginnings and his eclectic career. 

Every year, city officials face the challenge of balancing the Kansas City, Mo. budget. On this edition of Up To Date, Steve Kraske speaks with the city's Budget Officer Scott Huizenga and Director of city communications Chris Hernandez about what goes into— and comes out of— the Kansas City budget.

The recent suicide of State Auditor Tom Schweich brought new focus on the impact of political ads. In today's world, any detail of a political figure's life can be fodder for a brutal attack. On this edition of Up To Date, the Ethics Professors talk about when politics goes too far, and whether it's realistic to limit political tactics.

Guests:

Elle Moxley / KCUR

Former U.S. Sen. John C. Danforth spoke at the funeral Tuesday for state Auditor Thomas A. Schweich, who committed suicide in his St. Louis area home last week. In his emotional eulogy, Danforth called for a change in the current political climate, which he referred to as ugly, and "a low point."

For the entire text of Danforth's eulogy, click here.

According to a study done by the University of California-Los Angeles’ Civil Rights Project, Missouri Public Schools rank #1 for the highest suspension of black elementary school students. Missouri’s gap between suspension rates of black and white elementary students also is the nation’s largest. 
  One study found that students suspended or expelled for a discretionary violation are nearly three times more likely to be in contact with the juvenile justice system the following year.

Kansas lawmakers are looking to reduce the requirements to carry concealed firearms.  On this edition of Up to Date, we look at what's behind state lawmakers' push to eliminate the permit and training requirements for concealed carry.

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Risk and reward are part of the game when it comes to being an entrepreneur, but cracking the code for success requires more than just drive and luck.

On Monday's Up to Date,  the specific skills that can lead to triumph in an innovative venture. From failing wisely to finding the gap, there’s a variety to master.

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  In two of the films Up to Date's  indie, foreign and documentary film critics discuss, vampires dress up for nightclubs, and the Irish fairytale legend of the selkies comes to life. We also shine a light on the experience of living with Alzheimer's disease and what it's like to deal with Russian bureaucracy.

Here's a list of the films:

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