Scott Horsley | KCUR

Scott Horsley

Scott Horsley is a White House correspondent for NPR News. He reports on the policy and politics of the Trump Administration.

Horsley took up the White House beat in 2009 after serving as a San Diego-based business correspondent for NPR where he covered fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley was a reporter for member station KPBS-FM, where he received numerous honors, including a Public Radio News Directors' award for coverage of the California energy crisis.

Earlier in his career, Horsley worked as a reporter for WUSF-FM in Tampa, Florida, and as a news writer and reporter for commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University.

Trump, Putin Meet For Two Hours In Helsinki

26 minutes ago

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Updated at 10:58 a.m. ET

President Trump met with Russian President Vladimir Putin on Monday, just days after an American grand jury indicted 12 Russian intelligence officers on charges related to Russia's interference in the 2016 election.

The meeting, in Helsinki, was the first stand-alone summit between the two leaders.

Trump and Putin met privately for about two hours before being joined by their aides for a working lunch.

Updated at 10:50 a.m. ET

In a blow to organized labor, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that government workers who choose not to join a union cannot be charged for the cost of collective bargaining.

The vote was a predictable 5-4. Justice Samuel Alito wrote the majority opinion with the court's conservatives joining him.

In the sharply divided decision over President Trump's travel ban, the Supreme Court repudiated a notorious case from the last century: one that justified the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II.

Justice Sonia Sotomayor pointed to what she called "stark parallels" between the 1944 Korematsu decision and Tuesday's ruling, which upheld Trump administration restrictions on would-be visitors from Iran, Libya, North Korea, Syria, Venezuela, Somalia and Yemen.

Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET

After days of damaging news stories about an administration policy that separated immigrant families at the Southern border, President Trump tried to change the narrative Friday. He spoke up for grieving family members who have lost loved ones at the hands of people in the country illegally.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And I'm Rachel Martin in Singapore, where history has unfolded. It began with a handshake. President Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un, the leader of North Korea, then signed what they described as a historic agreement.

(SOUNDBITE OF PRESS CONFERENCE)

Veteran diplomats say it could take years to assess the results of this week's nuclear summit between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

Trump doesn't expect to wait that long.

"I think within the first minute, I'll know," whether Kim is serious about giving up his nuclear weapons, the president told reporters Saturday. "Just my touch. My feel. That's what I do."

Updated at 4:53 p.m. ET

President Trump said Thursday that his summit meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un next week could be "a great success," and held out the possibility of an unprecedented invitation to the White House for Kim if all goes well in Singapore.

For decades, President Trump has presented himself as a master dealmaker.

"I've made a lot of deals," Trump told reporters last month. "I know deals, I think, better than anybody knows deals."

That was part of the shtick on Trump's long-running TV show, The Apprentice. And it's the subject of his bestselling 1987 book, The Art of the Deal.

Updated at 5:00 p.m. ET

President Trump says his nuclear summit meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is back on.

"We'll be meeting on June 12 in Singapore," Trump told reporters on the South Lawn of the White House, after escorting Kim's top deputy, Kim Yong Chol, out of an Oval Office meeting.

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(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNITED STATES ARMY FIELD BAND: (Singing) Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord. He is...

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

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Updated at 4:47 p.m. ET

President Trump cautioned that his historic summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un may not happen as planned.

"There's a chance, there's a very substantial chance that it won't work out," Trump said during an Oval Office photo op with the president of South Korea. "I don't want to waste a lot of time. And I'm sure he doesn't want to waste a lot of time. So there's a very substantial chance that it won't work out and that's OK. That doesn't mean that it won't work out over a period of time."

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

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Updated at 5:24 p.m. ET

President Trump and Vice President Pence spoke to the National Rifle Association at the organization's annual meeting in Dallas on Friday — renewing a political partnership that was briefly tested by the deadly school shooting in Parkland, Fla.

America's new top diplomat received an enthusiastic welcome at the State Dept. Wednesday, as he promised to re-energize a department that's been largely sidelined in the first 15 months of the Trump administration.

"I want the State Department to get its swagger back. We need our men and women out at the front lines executing American diplomacy with great vigor and energy," Pompeo said during his ceremonial swearing-in ceremony. "To represent the finest nation in the history of civilization, we should be proud of that."

White House officials are defending chief of staff John Kelly, after an NBC News report said President Trump had soured on his top aide — and that Kelly had repeatedly called Trump an "idiot."

Kelly issued a statement Monday calling the NBC story "total B.S."

White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders dismissed rumors that Kelly might soon be reassigned and nominated to be secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

We're going to turn now to NPR's Scott Horsley, who was listening to Scott Pruitt's testimony today. Hi, Scott.

SCOTT HORSLEY, BYLINE: Good afternoon, Ari.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Updated at 5:53 p.m. ET

Detailed new allegations surfaced Wednesday against President Trump's nominee to lead the Department of Veterans Affairs, including charges that Dr. Ronny Jackson improperly dispensed pain medication and once wrecked a government vehicle while driving drunk.

Updated at 2:04 p.m. ET

President Trump is celebrating America's oldest alliance, with French President Emmanuel Macron. But even as they prepare for a lavish state dinner, the two leaders could not paper over stark differences on issues such as trade and the Iran nuclear deal.

Updated at 7:50 p.m. ET

President Trump said he would walk away from a planned meeting with North Korea's leader, Kim Jong Un, if it looked like the two sides were not going to be able to reach a deal.

"If we don't think it's going to be successful ... we won't have it," Trump said at a joint press conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe Wednesday at Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort. "If the meeting when I'm there is not fruitful, I will respectfully leave the meeting."

Updated at 4:32 p.m. ET

President Trump opens two days of talks with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Tuesday at his South Florida resort, under sunny blue skies that offer no hint of the clouds forming on the U.S.-Japan relationship.

The coordinated attack on Syria by U.S. and allied military forces illustrates the conflicting impulses behind President Trump's foreign policy. He remains an "America First" isolationist who disdains a role as global policeman. But Trump is also a determined counter-puncher who can be moved to action by grisly pictures he sees on TV.

President Trump was scheduled to travel to Lima, Peru, this weekend for the Summit of the Americas, which brings together leaders from throughout the Western Hemisphere. But the White House announced Tuesday that Trump would remain in the U.S. to oversee the American response to a suspected chemical weapons attack in Syria.

Vice President Pence will attend the summit in Trump's place. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and the president's daughter Ivanka Trump are also attending a gathering of CEOs held in conjunction with the summit.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Updated at 8:09 p.m. ET

President Trump says he was unaware that his attorney paid $130,000 to an adult film actress shortly before the 2016 election to prevent the woman from talking about an alleged sexual encounter with Trump.

The president told reporters traveling on Air Force One on Thursday that he didn't know where the money came from or why the payment was made.

"You'll have to ask Michael Cohen," Trump said. "Michael is my attorney. You'll have to ask Michael."

Updated at 8:01 p.m. ET

The nation's top environmental official kept busy Wednesday trying to clean up his own reputation, while a White House spokeswoman offered only a tepid defense.

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