Rachel Lippmann

Lippmann returned to her native St. Louis after spending two years covering state government in Lansing, Michigan. She earned her undergraduate degree from Northwestern University and followed (though not directly) in Maria Altman's footsteps in Springfield, also earning her graduate degree in public affairs reporting. She's also done reporting stints in Detroit, Michigan and Austin, Texas. Rachel likes to fill her free time with good books, good friends, good food, and good baseball.

For the latest updates on this developing story, see our live blog.

Two St. Louis-area police officers monitoring protesters at the Ferguson police department were shot shortly after midnight. While the injuries were termed serious, both officers were released from the hospital later in the morning.

Looking toward Thursday night, when at least one group has called for a candlelight vigil at the department, law enforcement officials announced that the County Police Department and the Missouri Highway Patrol would take over security around the headquarters on South Florissant Road.

Ronald Brockmeyer, the municipal judge in Ferguson, has resigned less than a week after a scathing federal report called his court little more than an ATM for the city. And the Missouri Supreme Court has ordered all Ferguson municipal court cases transferred to Judge Roy L. Richter of the Court of Appeals for the Eastern District of Missouri.

Since 2000, police departments in the state of Missouri have been required by law to report information about their traffic stops – including the race of the person pulled over. 

A grand jury in St. Louis County has decided not to charge Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson with a crime for the Aug. 9 death of Michael Brown, an unarmed, 18-year-old black man.

(Updated at 9 p.m., Mon., Nov. 17)

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has declared a state of emergency and called out the National Guard to protect “the two pillars: safety and speech’’ that he says could be tested in the aftermath of the grand jury’s decision regarding the August police shooting that killed teenager Michael Brown. 

"Our goal is to keep the peace and allow folks' voices to be heard,'' Nixon said Monday night in a conference call with reporters.

Updated at 1:40 p.m. with additional information.

A St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department officer working a second job with a private security company shot and killed a young black man, 18-year-old VonDerrit Myers Jr. The incident happened in the Shaw neighborhood in south St. Louis Wednesday night and drew a tense crowd that shouted at police and beat on their cruisers.

A federal judge in St. Louis has ruled that police in Ferguson cannot enforce what became known as the "five-second rule."  

Attorney General Eric Holder said Thursday that his conversations with residents of Ferguson during his visit two weeks ago influenced his decision to investigate the city’s police department.

Holder says he heard directly from residents and listening sessions “about the deep mistrust that has taken hold between law enforcement officials and members of the community. ... People consistently expressed concerns stemming from specific alleged incidents, from general policing practices, and from the lack of diversity on Ferguson’s police force.”

Thursday brought another night of calm to the streets of Ferguson.

One group that numbered about 100 at its peak marched up and down West Florissant Avenue, adding drumbeats to familiar protest chants. But many others just mingled on the sidewalk without any interference from police.

"It's very peaceful tonight," said Evelyn Wellington, who was among the watchers. "The police aren't bothering anybody, nobody's bothering the police, they're allowing us to rally. I love this."

The sound of honking horns became a symbol Thursday night along West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson.

It was the first night since Saturday -- the day Michael Brown was shot to death by a Ferguson police officer -- that traffic had been allowed to move freely along one of the main commercial strips in Ferguson. There was no line of police in riot gear and armored vehicles facing off against a crowd. The few officers spotted were in regular uniforms. The atmosphere felt more like a party than a protest.

Updated at 7 a.m. Monday
 
The situation in Ferguson has settled down following a night of destruction.
 
There is no more systematic looting, but small groups are still casing stores, according to St.

Updated with additional information from the press conference, copy of the case.

Eight same-sex couples in Missouri have filed suit seeking to have their out-of-state marriages recognized in the state.

The Better Business Bureau of St. Louis is reminding shoppers to be just as cautious after Christmas as before.

The organization's vice president of communications, Chris Thetford, says if you’re shopping in person, make sure you always know the location of your credit or debit card. Online, he says, make sure to use a secure site.

Updated at 10:05 a.m. Wednesday to correct Judge Teitelman's first name.

Updated with comments from the American Civil Liberties Union of Missouri.

The Missouri Supreme Court has ruled that a gay man whose longtime partner, a state trooper who was killed in the line of duty, is not eligible for the trooper's survivor benefits because the two were never married.

More than 100 elk are now living in southeast Missouri after efforts to restore the species to the state.
David Stonner / Missouri Department of Conservation

Missouri conservation officials say they are pleased with the way a three-year effort to restore elk to the southeastern part of the state is going.

The last group of elk arrived at the Peck Ranch conservation area this spring, bringing the total to around 100 animals.

Department of Conservation resource scientist Lonnie Hansen says the state will start controlling the population when it reaches about 400 elk.

Until then, the focus is on keeping the animals healthy.

Perhaps in an effort to put an end to an ongoing political battle over the practice, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has signed legislation blocking the state Department of Revenue from scanning and storing documents required to get a driver's license.

More than 1,000 United Mine Workers of America members were back in St. Louis Monday, the latest in a series of protests against Peabody Coal and its handling of their retirement and health care benefits.

St. Louis-based Peabody Coal spun off Patriot in 2007, and made it financially responsible for most retiree benefits. The rally is the first since a bankruptcy judge ruled last month that Patriot can impose sharp cuts in those benefits to get the company profitable again.

Courtesy of governor.mo.gov

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon says his budget for next year will expand funding for education for students of all ages.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics released union membership numbers today. The percentage of Missouri workers who are members of a union dropped to less than nine percent in 2012, following two years of slight gains.

jimmywayne / Flickr

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon is using his bully pulpit to push for the reinstatement of some exemptions to Missouri’s Sunshine Law.

Flickr/Adam_Procter400

Students on the four campuses of the University of Missouri system are facing another two percent increase in tuition next year. The proposed increase part of the preliminary budget presented to the Board of Curators and is similar to those of each of the last five years.   

Nixon: via Missouri Governor’s website, Spence: courtesy Alpha Packaging

In a state that went overwhelmingly for Mitt Romney, Democrat Jay Nixon was re-elected to a second term as governor of Missouri. 

Among the dozens of athletes hoping to leap, throw or run their way to London as part of the U.S. track and field team is 24-year-old runner Shannon Leinert.

Leinert, who will compete in the 800-meter dash, has dreamed of the Olympics since she was 10 and winning races in St. Louis, her hometown. If that weren't enough, she's also working on a doctoral degree in special education.

St. Louis, MO – Missouri's two Senators see completely different outcomes from the health care overhaul bill set to pass the Senate on Thursday.

"Compromise is not evil," said Democratic Senator Claire McCaskill, calling the measure a great deal for taxpayers. She's tired of the misinformation being spread about the legislation.

AG Race In Missouri

Oct 28, 2008

St. Louis, MO – The political spotlight in Missouri has focused mostly on a close presidential race and a contentious battle for the governor's office.

The attorney general's race has been keeping a lower profile. But it's the first contest for that office in 16 years that doesn't include Democrat Jay Nixon, who's running for governor against Republican Kenny Hulshof. And the attorney general candidates are two former legislators who once sat on the same side of the aisle in Jefferson City.

KWMU's Rachel Lippmann reports.