Matthew Long-Middleton

Central Standard Producer

Matthew has been involved in media since 2003. While hosting a show on his college radio station, he quickly realized the influence, intimacy and joys of radio. Rising up through the ranks, he became co-station manager of WKCO in 2006.

Matthew soon after graduated cum laude from Kenyon College. After a brief stint as a short-order cook in exotic Gambier, Ohio he joined Murray Street Productions as the marketing manager. At Murray Street he also conducted interviews, produced podcasts, wrote scripts for Jazz at Lincoln Center Radio, and made the office computers hum.

In addition to working at Murray Street, Matthew has done freelance radio production and his work has been featured on Chicago Public Radio’s local news program Eight Forty-Eight. He has also worked as a marketing assistant at WBGO in Newark, NJ, where he helped to grow audience through placing advertisements, managing the station social media, improving the website, building email campaigns and doing in person promotion at jazz events throughout New York and New Jersey.

Matthew now enjoys the thrills of producing KCUR's daily talk show Central Standard. When he's not producing you can typically find him biking, reading, cooking or exploring Kansas City.

Ways to Connect

Men In Uniform

Mar 28, 2016

According to Pellom McDaniels, when African-Americans served in World War I donning uniforms, the experience empowered them, not just as Americans but as men. On the homefront, they relived that dignity in their baseball careers. 

Guest:

A Kansas City-based filmmaker talks short films, mothers-in-law and wanting to knock an obnoxious guy's chair over at a picnic. Her most recent short film, I Was a Teenage Girl, Apparently, is making its local premiere

Guest:

  • Lynn Elliot, filmmaker 

How a KU professor and his students are using Google Earth to track the destruction of archaeological sites in Syria.

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Sequoia Maner grew up just miles from Compton, and she first heard rapper Kendrick Lamar’s mix tapes on local L.A. radio. Now she uses his art in class to probe race and radicalism. We hear her story and explore Lamar's work.

Maner will be the keynote speaker tonight at KU's Reflections on Kendrick Lamar.

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Recently, a controversy erupted in the Independence School District about the use of isolation rooms. How do teachers and administrators approach behavioral issues in the classroom? From grabbing the paddle to sparing the rod, to some new techniques, we explore how ideas about discipline in schools are changing.

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As the presidential primary continues and voters in both Kansas and Missouri await the general election, we visit with one demographic that doesn't always get a say: the teen demographic. 

Guests:

  • Suan Sonna, sophomore, Sumner Academy
  • Olivia Crabtree, senior, Archibishop O'Hara High School
  • Claire Gibbs, senior, Shawnee Mission East

DonkeyHotey / Flickr

Politics happen along party lines, and we mean that in more ways than one. Kansas Citians on the art of political fundraising. Specifically, the local fundraising parties that fill the coffers of national candidates.

Guests:

  • Sharon Hoffman, organizer for a variety of causes and candidates, including Obama's 2008 and 2012 Kansas City campaigns
  • Annie Presley, principle, McKellar Group

The quiet force behind the Kansas City Art Institute's Department of Ceramics describes falling in love with clay and finding inspiration in Kansas City's architecture (in part by riding a bike around town and breaking into abandoned buildings when she was an undergrad herself). 

Guest:

  • Cary Esser, chair, Department of Ceramics, The Kansas City Art Institute

It was the first newspaper he ever read, and he now considers himself its ambassador. Meet the new publisher of The Kansas City Star.

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We check in on the MidCoast Takeover, a showcase of local and regional bands at the South by Southwest music festival in Austin, Texas.

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Steve Johnson / Flickr

Water, in three parts: Kansas City's tap water, access issues on a Kansas Indian reservation, and a local guy whose bottled water collection has grown into The Museum of Bottled Water.

Guests:

  • Elle Moxley, reporter, KCUR
  • Gaylene Crouser, executive director, Kansas City Indian Center
  • Neal Wilson, founder and curator, The Museum of Bottled Water

First-generation college students head to campus saddled with hopes and dreams, but not necessarily the same resources as their peers. With rigorous academic demands, resposibilities to families, rising tuition and increased focus on experiences like study abroad, students breaking through the higher-ed barrier face a unique set of challenges. 

Guests:

Meet the guy who oversees Kansas City's 127 tornado sirens.

Guest:

  • Steve Bean, KCMO's Office of Emergency Management

Stuff

Mar 10, 2016

Is there a correlation between the way we relate to objects and the way we treat our relationships with people? A KU researcher has found that when we treat everything else as expendable … we may unwittingly treat human beings that way, too.

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It is OK to talk at a live music show? And what should you do when the people around you are talking so much that they're drowning out the music?

Guests:

Lori Nix

What would the world look like without humans? In her homemade dioramas, Lori Nix, a Kansas-born artist, depicts a post-apocalyptic world where nature has taken over.

Nix's photographs of her dioramas are on display at the Kansas Focus Gallery at the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art. She'll be giving a talk about her work on March 24.

Guest:

Activated

Mar 9, 2016

The protests at Mizzou last fall felt like game-changers for the overall visibility and power of student activism. What's the state of campus activism today? Plus, the history of campus protests, starting with objections to rancid butter in the 1770s.

Guests:

  • Storm Ervin, demonstrator, Concerned Students at The University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Angus Johnson, teacher and researcher, The City University of New York

Bruce Winter brought his Melinda Ryder persona to Kansas City in the 1970s, when all was quiet on the drag-queen front. A 60th-birthday profile of this leader within Kansas City's drag scene, who feels more free in costume. 

Guest:

  • Bruce Winter, AKA Melinda Ryder

It's Leavenworth, Kan., in the 1980s. Two young boys. One escaped convict. Two recently divorced parents too absorbed in their own struggles to fully supervise their children. An apartment-complex swimming pool. A mysterious new friend. 

Meet the Leavenworth-born novelist behind this vision.

Guests:

Now that simulated sky dives are a form of local entertainment, the time is right to ask: what's the difference between someone who jumps out of a plane for the joy of a free fall, and someone who considers that the opposite of fun? Sky-diving pros defend the appeal of their sport.

Guests:

Pittsburgh Craft Beers / Flickr

Bar food: it's salty, it's starchy, and you can usually pick it up with your hands. Beyond that, we make up our own rules. Whether it's by breaking the rules at the speakeasies of yesteryear, or enjoying a sandwich called a fluffernutter that's like a late-night pre-teen cabinet raid. A visit to Tom's Town Distilling Co., a spring-cheese tasting with a certified cheese expert and a critics roundtable on the best bar food in town.

Guests:

How a KU professor discovered that Neanderthals adorned their bodies with eagle talon jewelry.

Guest:

David Frayer, Professor, Department of Anthropology at KU

Matthew Ragan / Flickr

At a candlelight vigil in Hesston, Kansas, a local Mennonite pastor lit four candles — one for each of the victims of last week's mass shooting ... and one for the shooter.

We take a closer look at how Hesston's predominantly Mennonite community — a pacifist community — is responding to last week's events.

Guests:

Local musician Taryn Miller, who performs as Your Friend, talks about her new album, Gumption, and her upcoming national tour. Plus, a live in-studio performance.

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Remembering Fred Andrews, who helped build Kansas City's filmmaking community.

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Plant Study

Mar 1, 2016

Sutherlandia is a legume that's native to South Africa, where it's used to treat numerous infections, including HIV/AIDS. The benefits and safety of this treatment haven't been explored through the lens of western science... until now. MU's Bill Folk is part of a team running clinical trials on the plant and its uses.

Guest:

Sylvia Maria Gross / KCUR

 Now that Kansas City is home to multiple foreign language immersion schools, as well as a growing population of graduates of the programs, what are some of the idiosyncrasies of learning in a second language? And have the often-touted cognitive benefits of learning a second language been confirmed?

Guests:

BlueGold73 / Wikipedia

TIF (tax increment financing) is a major tool for encouraging development in blighted areas within the city. As neighborhoods transform and start to thrive, many question whether tax incentives are still necessary to lure new businesses. So what's the future of TIF, and is there a part of town that should benefit from a next round of TIF funding?

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An update on last night's mass shooting in and around Hesston, Kansas.

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Can you imagine what it would be like to regain your sense of hearing … after years of silence? One man’s story, as well as questions — within the deaf community — about whether deafness is something that requires correction.

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