Matthew Long-Middleton

Central Standard Producer

Matthew has been involved in media since 2003. While hosting a show on his college radio station, he quickly realized the influence, intimacy and joys of radio. Rising up through the ranks, he became co-station manager of WKCO in 2006.

Matthew soon after graduated cum laude from Kenyon College. After a brief stint as a short-order cook in exotic Gambier, Ohio he joined Murray Street Productions as the marketing manager. At Murray Street he also conducted interviews, produced podcasts, wrote scripts for Jazz at Lincoln Center Radio, and made the office computers hum.

In addition to working at Murray Street, Matthew has done freelance radio production and his work has been featured on Chicago Public Radio’s local news program Eight Forty-Eight. He has also worked as a marketing assistant at WBGO in Newark, NJ, where he helped to grow audience through placing advertisements, managing the station social media, improving the website, building email campaigns and doing in person promotion at jazz events throughout New York and New Jersey.

Matthew now enjoys the thrills of producing KCUR's daily talk show Central Standard. When he's not producing you can typically find him biking, reading, cooking or exploring Kansas City.

Ways to Connect

Cody Newill / KCUR 89.3

We explore why the world of science fiction is a battleground for issues of race, gender and identity — and why that field of battle is here in KC over the next few days at the World Science Fiction Convention.

Guests:

Courtesy Liana Marti Perez

KC's Brazilian community has been watching the Olympics in Rio with the rest of us, but through a particular lens of pride ... and concern.

We talk to some local Brazilian expats to hear what they think of the Olympics — and how Brazil is being portrayed.

Guests:

  • Carolina Shank, KC resident from Rio
  • Otavio Silva, local resident from Brazil
  • Liana Marti Perez, local resident who is at the Olympics

 

How are Kansas City's athletes doing at the Rio Olympics? KCUR's sports reporter gives us an update.

Guest:

Kyle Smith / KCUR 89.3

A former contestant on Project Runway: Junior discusses how his upbringing in Minneapolis, Kansas influences his creations — and how his design aesthetic is geared towards "BA women who want to look glamorous."

In this encore presentation of Central Standard, we revisit our conversation with teenage fashion designer Jaxson Metzler.

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Courtesy of Amina Hood / Amina Marie Millinery

Hats may not seem like the cutting edge of fashion, but one Brookside milliner is drawing international attention nevertheless. We invite Kansas City's own Amina Hood to share the personal story of her craft.

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Summer Fun

Aug 11, 2016

What did you do in the summer as a kid? How important is it that kids learn something and stay busy ... or get fresh air? As summer draws to a close, we explore how summer vacation is changing.

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As part of a series on mental health care in Kansas by Heartland Health Monitor, we take a look at the history of Topeka's landmark mental health center: the Menninger Clinic.

Guest:

  • Roy Menninger, former president, Menninger Clinic

Graphic novels are becoming more popular ... and they're also evolving. What exactly are they? A chat with someone who taught high-schoolers about this, plus two local authors, whose graphic novel was a finalist for the 2016 Eisner Award.

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More than a thousand of his musical works have been published, and they're performed everywhere from Carnegie Hall to your local church choir loft. We hear from Kansas City's own Mark Hayes, about his journey from playing the church piano as a teen, to becoming an internationally-known composer out of his home in KC. 

Guest:

Alyson Raletz / KCUR

Legendary KCUR and Kansas City radio reporter Dan Verbeck recently had a brush with death. With the help of his speedy arrival at the hospital, and the medical team's use of a technique called "therapeutic hypothermia," he was revived from a near fatal heart attack.

We hear Dan's story from his perspective, and then we hear from his doctor about the medical advances that allowed this to happen.

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Are you tired of politics yet? Neither are we! On this Audiophiles episode, we take a dive into some of the best political podcasts.

Guests:

  • Matt Staub
  • Kyle J. Smith

He's a nationally-known artist with a new work, Property, at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. And he's also a product of central Missouri.

We chat with Nick Cave about how Property takes a thousand of his own personal objects, many from his childhood, to tell a story of who he is ... and who we all are.

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Your Space

Aug 3, 2016

Outside of home, we spend the most time at work. How does your workspace impact your productivity and creativity? From cubicles to work benches to studios, how to design your own utopia.

 

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Dancing In The Street

Aug 2, 2016

Dance can be a way to express yourself, but it can also be a way to meet people and find community. Kansas Citians have tangoed, sashayed, two-stepped, and boogied all over the streets and dance floors of this city for decades. But what's new in the scene? What are the cultures of dancing in our city? And, are there still places to dance? 

Guests:

Total Eclipse Of The Sun

Aug 2, 2016
Flickr CC

On Aug. 21, 2017, the day will become night ... well, at least for a few minutes. For those lucky enough to be in the right place, this will be a total eclipse. And it just so happens that this time around, St. Joseph, Missouri is that place.

We explore this celestial anomaly, and check in with St. Joseph, where hotels and inns are already booked for the big event.

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Last month, the Simons family sold the Lawrence Journal-World after 125 years of local ownership. Now, the other shoe has dropped. We talk with one of the 30 staffers who was laid off last week. What does it mean for Lawrence and for the future of journalism?

Guest:

  • Karen Dillon, journalist

She was born on August 18, 1920, the very day that women were guaranteed the right to vote in America. And she died a few hours after Hillary Clinton became the first woman nominated by a major party for the presidency. We remember the life of Hila "Dutch" Newman, a longtime Missouri Democratic party activist.

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You know his voice ... but did you know his life? We remember KCUR's Steve Bell, who died last week doing one of the things he loved: getting ready for the afternoon newscast.

From a broadcasting career that began in 1958 to a stint as a psychologist — plus his love of animals and bluegrass music — we celebrate the life of our friend and a cherished voice to many.

Guests:

John Audobon marveled at its beauty; European princes crossed it in game safaris. Dan Flores’s American Serengeti tells the story of the Great Plains over the 19th Century, which saw the largest destruction of wildlife in modern history. 

We explore the historical ecology of the Great Plains. What have we lost, and what can we restore?

Guest: 

Yes You Are

Jul 21, 2016

An excerpt from Ghost Notes, a new music podcast in KC. Host Hannah Copeland talks with local band Yes You Are.

Guests:

  • Kianna Alarid
  • Jared White

We check in with a former UMKC runner who is headed to Rio for the Olympics.

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Last weekend in Wichita, a peaceful protest in support of Black Lives Matter turned into a community picnic with the police. How are we making similar efforts here in Kansas City?

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Hordes of storytellers from around the world are descending on Kansas City over the next few days for the National Storytelling Conference. How do we craft better stories and why does the way we tell stories matter? We find out why this ancient art is still in vogue today.  Plus, a story from last February's Flame KC event.

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Pokémon Go has taken Kansas City by storm. As Pokémon pop up around us, we chat about how video games have changed us, and we discuss the distinction between virtual reality and augmented reality. Then we let our guests and listeners get back to their quests to "catch 'em all."

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KCUR 89.3

Yesterday, we lost an esteemed colleague and friend here at KCUR. Steve Bell, our afternoon newscaster, collapsed on the job and passed away in the afternoon of July 18. We take some time to share memories of Steve.

Guests:

  • Dan Verbeck, retired KCUR reporter
  • Patty Cahill, former KCUR general manager

Potter's Field

Jun 30, 2016
Anna Sturla / KCUR 89.3

Leeds Cemetery, which is out by I-435, near the stadiums, is a potter's field. Underneath the empty, grassy field are the bodies of people whose families were too poor to pay for funerals.

We explore what happens to unclaimed bodies in Kansas City.

Guests:

  • Gloria Lundy, local resident whose grandfather is buried at Leeds
  • Bridget Anaya, manager, Charter Funerals

 

 

Beth Scupham/Flickr -- CC

Inspired by a new exhibit at Union Station, which features preserved corpses, we explore our relationship with our bodies.

Guests:

The KCMO City Council is debating a $27 million improvement package for the historic Jazz District at 18th and Vine. We look at the ongoing effort to revitalize and enhance the area — and hear why it has special meaning for some Kansas Citians.

Tonight's town hall meeting about the future of 18th and Vine starts at 6 p.m. at Centennial United Methodist Church.

Guests:

A look at Brexit and its impact across the globe, including here in KC. What's the professional and personal impact on people in the Midwest, and how will it affect our future?

Guests:

  • Raj Bhala, Associate Dean for International and Comparative Law, Rice Distinguished Professor, KU School of Law
  • Bart Dean, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology at KU
  • Kim Noble, former KCUR announcer
Faith Bemiss / The Sedalia Democrat

In Sedalia, Missouri, Marge Harlan spent $25,000 of her own money to build a "slave cabin." While she meant the cabin to honor the courage and resilience of African-Americans, many in the community, especially people of color, have found the gesture problematic and offensive.

We ask, how do we commemorate history? What is the best way to remember a conflicted and painful past? And who gets to decide?

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