Matthew Long-Middleton

Central Standard Producer

Matthew has been involved in media since 2003. While hosting a show on his college radio station, he quickly realized the influence, intimacy and joys of radio. Rising up through the ranks, he became co-station manager of WKCO in 2006.

Matthew soon after graduated cum laude from Kenyon College. After a brief stint as a short-order cook in exotic Gambier, Ohio he joined Murray Street Productions as the marketing manager. At Murray Street he also conducted interviews, produced podcasts, wrote scripts for Jazz at Lincoln Center Radio, and made the office computers hum.

In addition to working at Murray Street, Matthew has done freelance radio production and his work has been featured on Chicago Public Radio’s local news program Eight Forty-Eight. He has also worked as a marketing assistant at WBGO in Newark, NJ, where he helped to grow audience through placing advertisements, managing the station social media, improving the website, building email campaigns and doing in person promotion at jazz events throughout New York and New Jersey.

Matthew now enjoys the thrills of producing KCUR's daily talk show Central Standard. When he's not producing you can typically find him biking, reading, cooking or exploring Kansas City.

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Central Standard
6:00 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

Being Biracial-Bridging Two Worlds

Credit Nastassia Davis / Flickr -- Creative Commons

According to the US census, the number of people who consider themselves multiracial has grown by 32% over the past decade. Yet America’s troubled racial past and complicated attitudes about race can pose challenges for biracial families and children. Where does a biracial person fit in? What kind of identity crisis can they face? And what should parents think of when raising a biracial child? On the other hand, being from two or more cultures can be a rich and rewarding experience.

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Central Standard
6:19 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Where In The Brain Does An Itch And A Migraine Come From?

Credit Creative Commons

Remember the last time you had a mosquito bite, an allergy ridden nose, or a rash. The sensation that makes these small ailments torments is the desire to itch and experience that sweet relief following the act of scratching.

But much of what we experience when we feel an urge to itch is actually deep in the brain. On Wednesday's Central Standard we'll look at the science of itching and take a look into the the pain and mystery behind migraine headaches.

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Central Standard
5:41 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

What Happens To All Of Kansas City's Garbage?

Credit Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources / Flickr -- Creative Commons

How is it that all 2 million people in and around Kansas City don’t wake up surrounded by garbage every morning?

Think about it, every day 2 million people eat three meals a day; disposing packages, tissues, paper cups and much more throughout the day.

Where does it all go and how does it get managed?

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Central Standard Friday
9:49 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Food Critics: Vegan & Vegetarian Food

This soy burger looks delicious.
Credit Dan McKay / Flikr - CC

No eggs? No dairy? No meat? No problem!

Friday on Central Standard, food critics Charles Ferruzza, Chris Becicka, Mary Bloch, and Gloria Gale discussed the best vegan and vegetarian food in Cowtown.

Where are your favorite vegan/vegetarian restaurants? Let us know in the comments!

New and noteworthy

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Central Standard
7:59 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Peter von Ziegesar-A Kansas City Reporter's Memoir Of His Brother

Peter von Ziegesar spent many years living in Kansas City as a reporter at the Kansas City Star.  But, after he met his wife and moved to New York his homeless brother arrived out of the blue and sent his life into a new direction.  Peter von Ziegesar joins Central Standard discussing his newest book The Looking Glass Brother: A Memoir and recounts his time in Kansas City.

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Central Standard
9:52 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Aging Farmers

Credit Neuse Education Team / CC

Over the last few decades, the landscape and daily operations of the American farm have changed dramatically; technology, crop prices, crop technique and farm size. But one thing that has stayed the same is the individual farmers who are adapting to these techniques. Here's a startling statistic, for each farmer younger than 25, there are five who are 75 or older. And also, 25% of farmers are over the age of 65, which means retirement in the farming community is being prolonged.

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Central Standard
9:00 am
Wed July 10, 2013

What Does The Minecraft Video Game Tell Us About Society?

The work of many individuals in one server playing Minecraft.
Credit DancingChimp / Imgur

Perhaps you've seen kids - or some adults -  busily playing away on their computers or Xbox, moving through a virtual world of blocks, digging and building.

Maybe you've wondered: What exactly is that game?  

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Central Standard
5:05 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Why Are Secrets And Privacy So Important?

Do you ever get the feeling that you're being watched?
Credit Chris Samuel / Flickr -- Creative Commons

Right now our government is mining data about your conversations--who you called, when you called them, how long you talked, and who you’ve emailed. It’s all technically approved by law, but for many it’s deeply unsettling.

On this Central Standard we take a step backward and inward from the controversy surrounding domestic surveillance and look at the psychology of secrets and privacy with psychologist Bruce Liese.

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Central Standard Friday
9:14 am
Fri July 5, 2013

The '93 Flood: Twenty Years Later

The Red X in Riverside, Mo. during the 1993 floods.
Kenneth L. Kieser Missouri's Great Flood of '93-- Revisiting an Epic Natural Disaster

The Great Flood of 1993 absolutely battered the Midwest between April and October, with the peak occurring in July here in Kansas City.  Over 50 people lost their lives in incidence connected to the flooding over the summer of 1993.

Host Monrone Dodd talks with KCUR reporter Laura Ziegler, John Grothaus, Chief of Planning and Formulation for the Army Corps of Engineers; and Kenneth Kieser, author of Missouri's Great Flood of '93.

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Central Standard
11:38 am
Wed July 3, 2013

The Exciting World Of Molecular Mixology

Molecular mixology is a scientific approach to preparing cocktails that uses alcohol in unique ways.

These mixologists use chemistry to create cocktails with different tastes, textures and phases of matter. Arielle Johnson, a Ph.D candidate at UC Davis and a Flavor Chemist at Nordic Food Lab along with author Kevin Liu explained the science behind molecular mixology. And for those not as fluent in chemistry as Johnson and Liu, Scott Tipton of the Kill Devil Club in Kansas City created some drinks in studio to explain to the common bar goer. 

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Central Standard
9:28 am
Tue July 2, 2013

The Value Of The Humanities

Credit Chelsea Gomez / Flickr - CC

Last month on Central Standard, we discussed the importance of Science, Technology, Engineering, Month (STEM), but today we are here to reverse all that, and argue for just the opposite.

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Central Standard
8:58 am
Mon July 1, 2013

11 Places To Watch Fireworks In The Kansas City Area

Credit Anthony Cramp / Wikimedia--CC

From its inception, Americans have celebrated the Fourth of July with grand fireworks displays.

John Adams envisioned fireworks as part of the festivities before the Declaration of Independence was even signed, and the first commemorative Fourth of July featured a display that began and ended with 13 rockets.

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Central Standard Friday
4:00 am
Fri June 28, 2013

Food Critics: The Best Frozen Treats In Kansas City

Credit Kirti Podder / Flickr--Creative Commons

Summer in Kansas City is a unique time each year when the sun becomes relentless and the humidity makes it impossible to breathe. Sure, we've got air conditioning, but what if we need to go outdoors as well?

The Food Critics return to discuss the best way to beat the summer heat: frozen treats!

Host Charles Ferruzza talked with critics Gloria Gale, Mary Bloch, and Emily Farris to discuss the best ice cream, popsicles, frozen yogurt, and frozen novelties (FroYo and FroNo for the uninitiated) in Kansas City.

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Central Standard
6:08 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Youth Demonstrate Job Talents At Skills USA

Credit Barnshaws / Flickr -- Creative Commons

Hundreds of people are gathering to prove they are the best at a profession they have either just started or about to start. The Skills USA competition pits people in secondary and post-secondary education in head to head competition in talents ranging from computer programing, to cooking, to welding to over 90 other fields.

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Central Standard
6:59 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Implications Of The Board Of Trade Closing

Credit Jeremy Bernfeld / Harvest Public Media

Some of the famous names Kansas City – Kemper, Latshaw, Ohlmann – were people who at one time were chairman of the Kansas City Board of Trade.  Since 1856 the KC Board of trade has been home for commodity trading, such as hard red winter wheat, and as that history comes to an end on Friday Michael Braude, former President & CEO of the KCBT and Frank Stone, Chairman in ‘07, President of Clearing Corporation in ‘88 & ‘04, explore the impact the board of trade has had on the region and what the implications are for its closing.

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Central Standard
6:53 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Nature In The City: Summer Edition

Credit AnnCam / Flickr -- Creative Commons

Summer is here, the humid days and the hot nights. The nesting robins and the walks through nature sanctuaries. The dead armadillos by the side of the road, yes, it’s all part of Nature in the City.

Larry Rizzo, Natural History Biologist at the Missouri Department of Conservation in Kansas City, and Mark McKellar, formerly with the Nature Conservancy and the Audobon Society and now owner of the Backyard Bird Center in the Northland, join us to explore these issues and more on this summer edition of Nature in the City.

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Central Standard
6:45 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Supreme Court Rules On Voting Rights Act

Credit Wallyg / Flickr -- Creative Commons

The Supreme Court ruled 5-4 that section 4 of the 1965 Voting Rights Act is unconstitutional.  Section 4 is the part of the bill requiring certain states, mostly in the south, to get federal approval for changes to voting regulations.  Professor Allan Rostron provides an initial reaction and potential implication to this ruling.

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Central Standard
9:13 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

Saying Goodbye To Neal Conan

Credit Doby Photography / NPR

NPR’s Talk of the Nation ends a 21-year run this week. And that means the end of an era and a new start for its longtime host Neal Conan.  We talk with Neal Conan about the change of seasons in midday talk.

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Central Standard Friday
9:44 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Movie Critics: The Best Movies Out In June

For years, it seems like Hollywood has been remaking the same films over and over and over again. Have they run out of original ideas? Or is it the movie theaters and the audiences themselves who keep paying for the same movie every summer?

Our movie critics Russ Simmons, Thom Poe, Loey Lockerby, and special guest Justin Scott, director of marketing for Standees theater, talk about the problem of putting all your eggs in one basket, as well as the new and unique movies that Hollywood is making.

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Central Standard
6:31 pm
Wed June 19, 2013

Why Wicca Is A Misunderstood Religion

Wiccans celebrating the summer solstice
Credit Ryan Schuessler / KCUR

Friday, June 21 will be the summer solstice, the longest day of the year. And for one religious group it's a time to celebrate the Oak King falling to the Holly King.

We take a look at the often misunderstood Wiccan religion. Recently they’ve made inroads into popular acceptance, but practitioners still say there's more to be done.  Owen Davies, author of the book America Bewitched,  joins two local Wiccan practitioners, "J" and "Thorgo" to discuss the Wiccan faith locally and internationally.

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Central Standard
4:43 pm
Tue June 18, 2013

What The Farm Bill Means For Daily Life On The Farm

Credit Adam Arthur/Flickr--CC

The farm bill being discussed in the U.S. House of Representatives contains legislation having to do with all aspects of how Americans put food on their dinner tables.  About 80 percent of the bill deals with the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), what we often call “food stamps.” Other portions of the legislation, though, address policy governing the farms that create this food.

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Central Standard
8:23 am
Tue June 18, 2013

What You Should Know About The Food Stamp Debate

The 2013 Farm Bill could bring major cuts to Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Programs, formally known as food stamps.
Credit Beautiful Lily/Flickr--CC

The U.S. House is set to take up the farm bill this week, after the Senate passed its version of the bill in early June. Both bills include about $500 billion in spending over five years. Few pieces of legislation can produce such sharp divisions, even by Washington standards—but few could have such immediate, significant impact on so many Americans.

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Central Standard Friday
6:21 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Food Critics: Dining Entertainment

Where do you go for your favorite dining entertainment?
Credit Hinnerk R / WikiCommons

Food is a social activity, and where there are people entertainment follows.  On the Friday, June 14 the Central Standard food critics explore the best places to dine while catching a song, a game of trivia and more. 

Here is a list of some of the restaurants talked about on the show:

The New Places

The Red Door Grill - 11851 Roe Ave, Camelot Court Shopping Center, Leawood, KS 66211

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Central Standard
6:07 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Why Storm Chasers Do What They Do

Category F5 tornado viewed from the southeast as it approached Elie, Manitoba on Friday, June 22, 2007
Credit Justin Hobson / WikiCommons

Last month, as we all know, a series of tornadoes devastated areas around Oklahoma City, with dozens killed and hundreds injured over several days of storms.

Among the casualties were three men who were well known in the meteorological community and, indeed, to television audiences: Storm chasers Tim Samaras, his son Paul Samaras and Carl Young were doing interviews and sending back footage the day of the EF-3 El Reno storm that changed direction on them and killed them.

In light of these tragic events we wonder, just what is a storm chaser anyway?

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Central Standard
9:20 am
Thu June 13, 2013

The State Of Feral Hogs In Missouri

A feral hog and her piglets cross a dusty path.
Credit minds-eye/Flickr--Creative Commons

They spread disease and pollute the land. They devour birds and baby fauns. They have sharp teeth, weigh 300 pounds, and are now in 38 states across the US. It sounds like the stuff of nightmares, but the wild pig is real and they cause damage to farms and rural communities throughout America.

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Central Standard
6:51 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Cash Money Crew: Sandwich Generation

Credit Vinoth Chandar / Flickr -- Creative Commons

The Sandwich Generation--it’s made up of people who are generally between the ages of 45 and 65. On one side of the sandwich is that college grad who came back home to live. On the other side are one’s aging parents.  The strains are not just in time and energy, but are most acutely financial.  Alex Petrovic, of Petrovic Financial Services; Sandi Weaver, of Financial Security Advisors  and Corey Rasmussen of the Rasmussen Law Firm discuss the financial and legal issues that surround the care of an aging parent.

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Central Standard
6:24 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

The Problem Of Evil

Credit Riv / Flickr -- Creative Commons

It’s a question as old as humanity itself—why, in a world full of good options, do people still do bad things? Why do people who haven’t done anything wrong end up suffering, while those who use others for their own gain end up succeeding? And for heaven’s sake, how do we explain a Hitler? Or a Stalin? Or Idi Amin? How do we explain evil?

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Central Standard
6:22 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Program Helps Vets Get STEM Education

Credit "Veteran in transition" Cailey McClurken / veteransinstem.org

They've mastered advanced battlefield operations planning. They’ve navigated years of overseas intricacies and family complexities. But now, can they master trigonometry?

The Veteran in STEM program seeks to support veterans in acquiring the education they need to pursue jobs in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math fields.  While the process of retooling your education to focus on math or science might seem daunting to anybody, only half of STEM jobs require a bachelors degree or higher level of education, the other half typically require associate degrees or specific trade training.  Dean Kevin Truman of the School of Computing and Engineering and Alexis Petri, Co-Principal Investigator and Project Director of the KC BANCS program guide us through the unique supports and programing they've put together to help veterans advance their education and careers.

Central Standard Friday
9:38 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Guerrilla Warfare During The Civil War

Credit The History Press

When the Confederate Army was pushed from Missouri, a slave state that hadn't ceded from the Union, in late 1861 ordinary people transformed themselves into guerilla fighters for the confederate cause.  A mayor's son and town teacher were among those who found themselves part of one of the most violent band of guerilla fighters lead by "Bloody" Bill Anderson.  After the war they became notable bank and train robbers.  But, there were also ordinary citizens who dedicated their lives to hunting these guerillas down, sometimes with equal violence.  Author James "Jim" W.

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Central Standard
6:30 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

City Fountains At Risk

Credit WhiteRabbitArt / Flickr -- Creative Commons

Just as many fountains as Rome? Perhaps.  Whether Kansas City meets or falls short of these accolades the fountains, which began as a practical tool for keeping horses hydrated, have turned into a unique symbol of regional identity and pride.  But, these fountains are at risk.  With decreasing city parks budgets maintaining these iconic fountains has been difficult.  Currently, over half are in need of maintenance and a fourth are in critical condition.  Mark McHenry, director of the  Kansas City Parks and Recreation Department gives delivers the story of our city fountains and what's being done to help keep them running.

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