Luke X. Martin | KCUR

Luke X. Martin

Associate Producer, Up To Date

Luke X. Martin is an associate producer for KCUR's Up To Date.

Born in Manhattan, Kansas, and raised in Wichita, Luke fell in love with public radio listening to KMUW. He got his start pulling early morning DJ shifts at KJHK in Lawrence while he was a student at KU.

Luke was previously an intern for Up To Date, and joined the team as a producer in 2016. His work has appeared online for UPI.com, The Daily Caller, Politics Daily and The Pitch.

He has a Master of Science degree from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University. If you see him limping along a running trail in Kansas City or the suburbs, please offer him a drink of water or a high-five.

Ways to Connect

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Not only is David Litt one of the youngest presidential speechwriters ever, but he also has the distinct (dis)honor of deplaning Air Force One in his pajamas. Today, Litt shares stories about his time writing jokes — and some serious stuff, too — for President Barack Obama.

Music Box Films

KCUR prides itself on the breadth of our coverage, but Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary Film Critics are really pushing the envelope with this weekend's recommendations. From the slow creep of Nazism in the 1930s to the partition of India to a shoemaker whose name is regularly dropped by fashion editors, movies stars, and rappers alike, this batch of movies is all over the map. We'll leave it up to you to find a through line.

Cynthia Haines

13 Minutes, R

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

You wouldn't believe some of the things that bring people to violence, says Annette Lantz-Simmons. Mundane, seemingly everyday occurrences can lead down a dark path. 

The executive director of the Center for Conflict Resolution recalls an incident several years ago between neighbors with kids.

"The children would play outside and be noisy and use screaming voices," she says. "It got to the point where one of the parents was making death threats because of the noise."

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Chances are good that you've heard of Dan Brown before. (Does The Da Vinci Code ring a bell?) Today, the mega best-selling author talks about about his latest thriller, Origin, and explains why he thinks God won't survive the next hundred years. Then, we find out how reframing the gun control debate can help prevent more children being killed in gun violence.

Public Domain

They may be icons of the old west, but cowboys aren't just an American phenomenon. Today, we learn the long history of the horseback herdsmen, whose roots go back to Africa. Then, we discuss climate change and the complexities of reducing fossil fuel use with environmentalist Bill McKibben. Later, we ask Sam Cossman why on earth he climbs into active volcanoes and what he hopes to gain from doing so.

Travel Nevada / Flickr - CC

With the country's attention trained on Sunday night's tragic events in Las Vegas, we discuss whether the worst mass shooting in modern American history might shift the attitudes of Second Amendment advocates, and hear how police departments train and respond to quickly-developing kinetic events.

Sundance Selects

From Puerto Rican devastation and despair to the political caterwauls playing out on football fields, there are plenty of reasons people may want to tune out for a few days. For those looking to pause and pardon themselves from current events, Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary Film Critics present the following movie recommendations, which will provide some respite and, hopefully, perspective.

Steve Walker

The Unknown Girl, Not rated

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Emergency preparedness is in the national consciousness in a big way. Today, the Smart Money Experts make a special trip to the studio to discuss preparing your family's finances for the wide-ranging effects of a natural disaster. Then, Kansas City voters in April approved a one-eighth-cent sales tax increase aimed at developing the long-neglected east side of town.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Less than two months since its opening, Lenexa’s City Center development is already transforming the way that city’s residents interact with their government, and changing how the metro thinks about the Kansas suburb.

The project, just one in a set of sprawling properties centered around 87th Street and Renner Boulevard, is the culmination of 20 years of work to make real a long-standing community vision for a new downtown.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Despite decades of government assistance, violent crime continues in too many American neighborhoods. That's why Bob Woodson, founder of the Woodson Center, thinks the solution for troubled communities must come from local leaders themselves, not from the federal or state level.

NTNU - Norwegian University of Science and Technology / Flickr - CC

For some, a belief in God and adherence to fact-based scientific research are mutually exclusive. That's not the case for Katherine Hayhoe, who's had remarkable success convincing evangelical Christians that climate change is caused largely by human activity. It could be because she's a conservative Christian herself.

Elena Seibert / gretchenrubin.com

If you've ever worked with someone who had trouble following through, or dealt with a kid who's constantly pushing your buttons, you'll want to hear this conversation. Best-selling author and Kansas City native Gretchen Rubin says peoples' reactions to expectation influence their behavior in a big way.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

For centuries, refugees from all over the world have taken to the seas to escape violence and persecution in their homelands. Today, the author of a children's book published this year recounts just a few of their stories. Then, we speak to the director and producer of a new film about Gertrude Bell, who's been called the most powerful woman in the British Empire during World War I.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Overland Park writer Jen Mann was inspired to create her People I Want to Punch in the Throat blog by, well, all the people she wants to punch in the throat. Today, we speak with the New York Times best-selling author about the latest installment in her snarky series, and about the people she's worked with who almost — almost! — forced her to fisticuffs.

A24 Films

Everyone needs a break now and then from the quotidian, which is why this week's recommendations from Up To Date's independent, foreign and documentary film critics are chock-full of characters attempting extraordinary things. Whether or not you follow in their footsteps is up to you, but their stories are sure to stretch your perspective and shift your paradigm.

Cynthia Haines

Harold and Lillian: A Hollywood Love Story, Not rated

Missouri Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal and Rep. Warren Love made news last month doing something that seems antithetical to their positions in government; hoping in Facebook posts for political violence.

Florent Vassault

The consequences of a death sentence most obviously affect the accused, but everyone involved in the case must deal with the decision's terminal implications. Today, we hear how a 1994 death sentence in Mississippi is affecting one juror's life decades later. Then, we explore how America's legacy of lynching still influences race relations in Missouri, Kansas and throughout the country.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

It's Friday and we're celebrating the end of the work week with a nice glass of wine and a live broadcast from Holy-Field Winery in Basehor, Kansas. Today, we speak with master sommelier Doug Frost and three vintners from Missouri and Kansas about what it takes to grow great grapes and make marvelous wine in the Midwest. It's not as easy as you might think!

The wine we sampled during the broadcast includes:

Yassie / Wikimedia Commons

As Mun Choi approaches six months on the job as president of the University of Missouri System, the challenges keep coming.

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens' state budget for fiscal year 2017 included a $37 million cut to the university system and the potential for $57 million more in permanent cuts in 2018.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

As the country prepared for the first total solar eclipse over the continental United States in decades, the Up To Date crew headed into the path of totality for a live broadcast from Parkville, Missouri, and the campus of Park University. We found out why scientists, students and historians were excited about the celestial event.

Takeshi Kuboki / Flickr - CC

Birds, bees, fish, and all sorts of other animals exponentially expand their intelligence and abilities when they cluster together in swarms. Can humans do the same? Today, we find out how researchers are harnessing the benefits of the hive mind to create smarter, safer artificial intelligence.

Pixabay - CC

Adam Foss, a former assistant district attorney in Suffolk County, Mass., says today's justice system is the same as the one created hundreds of years ago, and it's failing a lot of people. Today, a conversation on how prosecutors can help fix the criminal justice system. Then, we get caught up on the state of organized labor in Missouri and the status of the

Sekgei / Flickr - CC

Does work have you feeling stressed out, or maybe it's politics or something in your personal life? Today, we explore two approaches to understanding and moving past those frustrations. First, we learn a little about how mindfulness meditation can help quiet your mind and bring about a new consciousness. Then, we find out how "traditional" family roles for mothers and fathers might be introducing tension into romantic relationships and parenthood.

Pixabay - CC

Tensions over the Jackson County jail continue to mount. Attorneys for former inmates filed a class-action lawsuit last week that would force authorities to address the detention center's dangerous, dirty conditions. Today, we speak with two Jackson County legislators about what they'd do to improve the facility. Then, we kick off a week full of conversation with presenters from this year's TEDxKC.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Everyone shares the same biology, but that doesn't mean we all enjoy the same access to unprejudiced medical training, health care or advice. Today, we speak with Dr. Damon Tweedy about being a Black Man in a White Coat in a country where being African-American can be bad for your health. Then, we get a quick recap of results from Tuesday's election in Kansas City, Missouri.

frankieleon / Flickr - CC

While communities across the country deal with dramatic increases in illegal opioid use, statistics in Johnson County suggest rates of death and addiction closer to home are relatively more stable.

Court filings involving opioid offenses have remained relatively flat in recent years, and illegal use has decreased for hydrocodone and oxycodone, two of the most popular opiates, according to a report from public health and crime experts presented to the Johnson County Commission in June. Heroin use remains steady.

Despite those encouraging numbers, local officials are wary.

frankieleon / Flickr - CC

Just because court filings suggest illegal opioid use is down in Kansas' wealthiest county doesn't mean its residents are unaffected by rising usage nationwide. Today, we'll find out what opiate use looks like in Johnson County. Then, we learn what exactly makes sports fandom such a big deal in Kansas City, whether it's for the Chiefs, the Royals or Sporting KC.

Universal Pictures / Warner Bros. / MGM/UA Entertainment Co.

From E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial to Poltergeist, the summer of '82 was a seminal one for smash-hits that stood the test of time. Today, Up To Date's Video Gurus reunite to reminisce on the raft of red-hot motion pictures from the Reagan era, which helped establish a cinema season most Americans now take for granted.

Roadside Attractions

Some people believe they were born in the wrong era. If you just can't seem to find your place in the age of Big Data, Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics have a set of recommendations to take you back to your spiritual time span. Whether you're pining for the Victorian 1850s or the bullish 1990s, take a break this weekend from push notifications and iPads, and enjoy the simplicity of bygone days.

Steve Walker

Landline, R

Harris & Ewing / U.S. Library of Congress

People generally get their history lessons from a book or movie, not from a vending machine. Today, we learn about a novel way to put historical photos of Kansas City into the hands of City Market Park visitors.

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