Durrie Bouscaren

Durrie Bouscaren is a general assignment reporter, based in Des Moines. She covers breaking stories, economic news, and reports from the Statehouse during the legislative session. 

Bouscaren joined IPR in March of 2013 as a one-woman bureau in Cedar Rapids. Her passion for public radio began in high school, when she would listen to BBC World Service newscasts in the middle of the night. While attending Syracuse University, she reported and produced local news for member station WAER, and received a statewide Associated Press Broadcasters Association award for a report on Syracuse’s Southern Sudanese community. Bouscaren also covered Syracuse and small towns  throughout Central New York as a stringer for WRVO Public Media. Her work has aired on NPR's All Things Considered, WBEZ's Front and Center and KQED's The California Report

Bouscaren's favorite public radio program is Planet Money.

Health
4:19 pm
Thu November 20, 2014

Patient Tests Negative For Ebola In Jefferson County

The Ebola virus, shown through transmission electron micrograph.

Originally published on Fri November 21, 2014 4:36 pm

Updated at 6:40 p.m.

A Jefferson County woman who was showing symptoms of Ebola has initially tested negative for the virus at Mercy Hospital in Crystal City. As a precautionary measure, officials said she will remain in an isolation room for treatment and will be monitored according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines.

Read more
Education
7:54 am
Tue November 18, 2014

Fewer Missouri Children Using Subsidized Childcare

Originally published on Wed November 19, 2014 10:02 am

About 12,300 fewer children attended federally subsidized day cares in Missouri during fiscal year 2013 than in 2012. That marks the largest decline in the country. But child service nonprofits say it’s unlikely the decline is due entirely to a reduction in need. Instead, it may be due to changes within the state agency that administers the funds.

Read more
St. Louis
7:50 am
Fri October 10, 2014

Protesters Clash With Police In St. Louis' Shaw Neighborhood

Police stand in a skirmish line at the intersection of South Grand Avenue and Arsenal Street, in St. Louis on Oct. 9.
Credit Joseph Leahy / St. Louis Public Radio

A candlelight vigil for an 18-year-old shooting victim turned into a protest march through the Shaw neighborhood in south St. Louis late Thursday.

The protesters were mostly peaceful as they marched up and down residential streets in the neighborhood. But things turned uneasy as the evening wore on. A group of about 40 people blocked traffic at major intersections along South Grand Blvd. Later, some of the protesters broke windows of police cars.

Read more
NPR Story
10:27 am
Sat August 16, 2014

Curfew Imposed In Ferguson Midnight To 5 A.M. After Night Ends In Tear Gas And Looting

Drummers attract a crowd during sixth night of demonstrations in Ferguson.

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 4:02 pm

(Update: 3:53 p.m. Saturday) Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon on Saturday declared a state of emergency and said a curfew would be imposed in Ferguson from midnight to 5 a.m.

He made the announcement with Missouri Highway Patrol Capt. Ron Johnson and several other officials at a tumultuous news conference at Greater St. Mark Family Church. Nixon has put Johnson and the patrol in charge of maintaining order in Ferguson, which has been at the center of unrest since a police shooting last Saturday killed 18-year-old Michael Brown.

Read more
Michael Brown Shooting
8:10 am
Wed August 13, 2014

St. Louis Area Police Forces Are Less Diverse Than Communities They Serve, Statistics Show

Protesters are greeted by a wall of police officers after a march to the Ferguson police department on August 11, 2014. People are upset because of the Ferguson Police shooting and death of an unarmed black teenager Michael Brown on August 9, 2014. In all about 20 businesses sustained damage after a candlelight vigil turned violent.

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 4:05 pm

The calls for greater representation of minorities in the region's law enforcement ranks have grown louder in the wake of the death of 18-year-old Michael Brown at the hands of a Ferguson police officer. Protesters want to see more minorities especially in the police departments serving predominantly African-American communities.

Two-thirds of Ferguson’s residents are black, according to 2013 census records. But there are only three African Americans on the city’s 53-member police force. The city council is also predominantly white, as is the mayor.

Read more
Same-Sex Marriage And The Supreme Court
3:55 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

After DOMA Ruling, Binational Gay Couples Face New Issues

Brian Mathers calls his husband, Isidro, in Mexico from his living room in Sioux City, Iowa. Brian and Isidro have been separated for more than a year by immigration laws that did not recognize their marriage.
Durrie Bouscaren NPR

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 5:13 pm

Now that the Supreme Court struck down a key section of the Defense of Marriage Act, or DOMA, same-sex couples can apply for their foreign-born husbands, wives and fiancees to join them in the United States.

There are an estimated 28,000 gay and lesbian binational couples in the country, and for years many have been separated by immigration laws that didn't recognize their marriage.

Read more