Andrea Tudhope | KCUR

Andrea Tudhope

Reporter

Andrea Tudhope is a reporter for KCUR. Prior to this post, she spent two years as associate producer for KCUR's Central Standard. She covers everything from sexual assault and homicide, to domestic violence and race relations. In 2017, Andrea received a fellowship from the Columbia Journalism School's Dart Center to report on gun violence in Kansas City.

She graduated from Colorado College in Colorado Springs in 2013 with a degree in Comparative Literature and Philosophy. In 2012, Andrea spent a year editing, conducting interviews and analyzing data for the Colorado Springs Gazette series "Other Than Honorable," by investigative reporter Dave Philipps, which won a Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting in 2014. She is currently working on a book based on field research and interviews she conducted in Dublin, Ireland in 2012.

Ways to Connect

Hannah Copeland / KCUR 89.3

Saturday night's mass shooting at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, marked the deadliest shooting on U.S. soil in recent history, with 49 dead and 53 more wounded. The LGBT community wasn't the only community that bore the brunt of this attack — the vast majority of the victims were Latino or Latina, and other people of color. How is Kansas City's local Latino community reacting to the news?

A update on a proposed retail and residential development in Overland Park that would rival the size of the Plaza.

Guest:

Rick Hellman, freelance journalist

Courtesy of Joshua Hoffine

Joshua Hoffine is a local photographer. He doesn't take your typical wedding or graduation portraits, though — his specialty is "horror photography," and he features his daughters in his photo shoots.

Guest:

Michael Bentley / Flickr

A quiet debate is raging over liquor licensing laws in the Crossroads District. Does it matter, to the character of a neighborhood, what time bars and restaurants issue that famous last call? If you don't have to go home but you can't stay here, what are your options, and who's making those choices?

Guests:

Is autism a culture, a disability ... or maybe both? We explore the community around autism, and if that “disability” is truly disabling.

Guests:

 

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Yesterday, Southwest Early Campus in Brookside closed its doors for the last time. We explore the legacy of the 100-year-old Southwest High School.

We also hear the story of Daizsa Laye Bausby, whose death in a hotel room was ruled a homicide. She was supposed to graduate from Southwest this year. Was the life of this young black woman ignored by local media?

Guests:

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Tuesday night, around 70 students from Southwest Early College Campus (SWECC) attended the school’s final graduation ceremony at Unity Temple. They entered the room to "Pomp and Circumstance," dressed in traditional black gowns.

As they took their seats, one seat remained empty in the front row.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

It’s graduation season for many area high schools. And for one Kansas City public high school, this year’s graduation was the last.

The Kansas City Public Schools (KCPS) announced in late February that Southwest Early College Campus (SWECC) would be shutting down after the last day of classes on May 17. 

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

"Witchy, tacky grandma."

That’s how Kansas City artist Rodolfo Marron III describes his aesthetic.

“I say it as a joke, but it’s kind of accurate,” he says. “My work is softer, maybe more effeminate. I embrace that.”

Growing up on the city's Westside during the 1990s, Marron experienced a rougher neighborhood than the one many know it as now. He lost many family friends to gang violence during a time he remembers as dark and gray. At an early age, he found escape in his art by creating characters and other worlds.

Charlotte Street Foundation

Rodolfo Marron is an artist who grew up in the 1990s, on Kansas City's West Side. It was a grittier place back then, he says. For an escape, he started creating characters who inspired him. Now, he draws on Kansas City stories and the materials that grow wild in backyards and along highways.

Guest:

We visit the kitchen of a local chef to learn how to make ice cream if you don't have an ice cream maker (hint: it involves bananas ... and some liqueur, if you're so inclined), then KCUR's Food Critics search out the best ice cream in and around KC.

Guests:

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

If you have seen the show "Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood" — or, in other words, if you have infant children — you probably know about "banana swirl." Or, you should, according to Rachel Ciordas.

Walker Evans / Public Domain/Documentary Portraits of Mississippi: The Thirties, Selected and Edited by Patti Carr Black

In this encore presentation of Central Standard: Kansas City is known as the "Crossroads of America" for its major interstates and sizable rail network. What is it like to hitchhike here? Plus, a discussion on the best — and not-so-great — bathrooms in town.

Guests:

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

We visit a Filipino restaurant in Grain Valley, and we hear more about a French-Korean bakery that set up shop in Overland Park. Then, our Food Critics search out the best Asian food in and around KC.

Guests:

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Story of a Song is a monthly segment on KCUR's Central Standard, in which local musicians tell the story behind a recent song, and explain how it was constructed musically. 

The project: Igor Stravinsky's "L'Histoire du Soldat," or "A Soldier's Tale."

Paul Andrews

He's a self-taught cook (from the classic cookbook, The Joy of Cooking) who's a semifinalist for "Best Chef: Midwest" in the 2016 James Beard Awards.

Meet Jonathan Justus — a former bike messenger, repo man and gallery-represented painter — whose restaurant has put Smithville, Missouri on the culinary map.

Guest:

Jessica Spengler/Flickr -- CC

We visit the production facility of Meshuggah Bagels, which will open a storefront in Westport this Spring. Then a local maven weighs in on Jewish delis — and whether a New York-style bagel can be replicated outside of NYC.

Guest:

  • David Seldner, bagel and deli maven

Andrea Tudhope / / KCUR 89.3

Last November, for the first time, Kansas City child care workers spoke out about their low wages, as they officially joined fast food and other low wage workers in the Fight for 15, a movement to raise the minimum wage to $15 per hour.

Alison Claire Peck / alisonclairepeck.com

Story of a Song is a monthly segment on KCUR's Central Standard, in which local musicians tell the story behind a recent song, and explain how it was constructed musically.

Artists: Hermon Mehari, Julia Haile, Brad Williams, Anthony Saunders of The Buhs

The Song: "Can't Let Go"

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR

Paying for care is expensive — whether it's child-care, in-home nursing or help for an aging relative. And according to the Economic Policy Institute, home health care and child-care workers are among the lowest-paid professionals in the United States.

What is the cost of care, both financially and emotionally? We take a close look at the delicate dance between families and professional care providers.

Guests:

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

If soup is the answer to your cold weather woes, you're not alone. A doctor explains why soup makes us feel better, then our critics guide us to the best soups and stews in town, including insights into the new ramen craze. Bonus: what's new and noteworthy in the Kansas City restaurant scene? Our critics let us in on the people and places to watch right now.

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You know those gigantic dinosaur models you see in natural history museums, frozen in mid-roar? There's a good chance they were made in Kearney, Missouri by a guy named Gary Staab. From his encounter with Lucy (the famous skeleton of our human ancestor) to a mummified human known as the Ice Man, this encore presentation of our conversation with Gary takes us face to face with prehistoric life. 

Guest:

An encore edition of Central Standard: With Kansas City's transgender community reeling from news of the violent death of Tamara Dominguez, a 36-year-old woman who was both transgender and Latina, concerns about safety for transgender people of color have risen to the surface.

How did the Crossroads go from a gritty neighborhood with abandoned buildings to a vibrant destination spot? Crossroads pioneer Jim Leedy, an architect and a longtime gallery owner share their memories.

Plus: A Tax Increment Financing (TIF) explainer and the recent controversy about the blight designation for Crossroads development.

Guests:

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Against the clean, stark white interior at 529 Southwest Boulevard in Kansas City, a seafoam blue room seems to bloom behind an open door frame at the back of the main space.

That room will soon house Kansas City's first public darkroom.

Night Blooms Darkroom & Bookstore will officially open to the public on the evening of Jan. 1, during the first First Friday of 2016. The space is located just on the cusp of the Crossroads District, across the boulevard from Hammerpress.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Capturing a photographic image is as simple as pressing a button on your phone. But don't count film photography out just yet. We talk with the president of the Society for Contemporary Photography, an organization that started meeting again after a hiatus, and the person behind Night Blooms, KC's first public darkroom that's slated to open in January.

Guests:

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR

According to environmental journalist Simran Sethi, indulging in the sensual side of food can be revolutionary. How taste and sustainability go hand-in-hand, including extended discussions about karah prasad (holy bread in the Sikh tradition) and chocolate.

Guests:

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

The University of Missouri-Columbia made national headlines over the past few weeks amidst rising racial tensions and resulting protests on campus.

As the conversation unfolded, a handful of terms have taken the spotlight online and in the media. Like safe space, systematic oppression and the First Amendment, to name a few.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Kansas City-area childcare workers joined the minimum wage fight Tuesday with a rally and protest at a childcare center on Troost Avenue.

The workers used the event at UBUNTU to publicly join the "Fight for 15," a national movement raise the minimum wage to $15 per hour.

Paul Sableman / Flickr

If white flight is making a u-turn and the suburbs are seeing an influx of black residents, are we becoming any more integrated, or are we just trading places?

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