Andrea Tudhope

Reporter, Associate Producer, Central Standard

Andrea Tudhope is a freelance reporter for KCUR, and an associate producer for Central StandardShe covers everything from sexual assault and homicide, to domestic violence and race relations. In 2017, Andrea received a fellowship from the Columbia Journalism School's Dart Center to report on gun violence in Kansas City.

She graduated from Colorado College in Colorado Springs in 2013 with a degree in Comparative Literature and Philosophy. In 2012, Andrea spent a year editing, conducting interviews and analyzing data for the Colorado Springs Gazette series "Other Than Honorable," by investigative reporter Dave Philipps, which won a Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting in 2014. She is currently working on a book based on field research and interviews she conducted in Dublin, Ireland in 2012.

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Brian Chan

The band: Jorge Arana Trio

The songs: "Mammoth," "Speak Beast"

The story: "It started with a very simple riff," says Jorge Arana, of his latest album "Mammoth."

Courtesy of the artist and Tiwani Contemporary, London

When you think sexual revolution, you're probably thinking of the 1960s or 1970s, right? Well, it began much earlier than that. KU sociologist Brian Donovan's new book explores the implications of sex crime trials in the 1900s.

We also meet Canadian artist and Kenyan refugee Dawit L. Petros, whose photographs are currently on display at the H&R Block Artspace.

Laura Spencer / KCUR

Troost Avenue has seen many revitalization plans over time, but there's little to show for it. Why? A look at the past and the future development of the Troost Corridor.

Guests:

Thomas Leuthard / Flickr-CC

Media critic Jay Rosen has been writing about evidence-based vs. accusation-driven journalism for years. Rosen joins us, along with a few local thinkers, in conversation about what's at stake for journalism, and what's next, as we head into a Trump presidency.

Courtesy of Katie Kuhlman

A 15-year-old boy charged with sexual assault against two Shawnee Mission East students pleaded guilty to two counts of aggravated battery in Johnson County Juvenile Court Thursday.

The Leawood teenager was charged in September for three counts of indecent liberties with a minor after he was reported to have sexually assaulted two students, one in a bathroom at the high school. Though another student was said to have held the door shut during the incident, no one else was charged with any crimes in relation to the case. 

Photographer Seph Lawless has been photographing abandoned malls and deserted locations for over a decade. But he calls Metro North Mall the creepiest in America. A chat with Seph about his Metro North photos, and also with a KC Star reporter about the state of our malls — and mall development — in town.

Plus, an encore presentation with a local author whose Landry Park books for teens depict a dystopian Kansas City in the year 2300.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

A sea of red beanies, T-shirts and flags filled the median at 63rd and Paseo in Kansas City Tuesday night as more than 400 people gathered for the final phase of the "Fight for $15's Day of Disruption."

Workers nationwide celebrated the fourth anniversary of the Fight for $15, and the $61.5 billion low-wage workers have reportedly earned since the movement launched in 2012.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

A shootout in Midland True Value's parking lot at Gregory Boulevard and Prospect Avenue that started after 2 a.m. Sunday ended in seven gun-related injuries and three vehicle accidents. One victim is in critical condition.

Minutes after receiving a call around 2:19 a.m., police arrived at the scene where suspects were engaged in active shooting. According to the Kansas City Police Department, one officer, fearing for safety, fired shots. No officers were injured.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Updated, 3 p.m. Friday Nov. 25:

After suffering a massive fire earlier this month, the Evangelistic Center Church east of downtown wasn’t sure they could provide their typical community services after a fire destroyed their building.

The fire incinerated both the old building and a newer annex, including a kitchen and pantry full of goods for Thanksgiving.

Lisa Rodriguez / KCUR 89.3

Last week's election left one notorious glass ceiling intact. So what does that mean for local women, and women in government?

Plus, it's National Day of Action against the Dakota Access Pipeline. How might the proposed North Dakota pipeline impact our indigenous communities, and general populous, here in Kansas City?

Guests:

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Balloons were practically spilling out of the doors, as parents and children filed into the Central Library in downtown Kansas City for the first ever City School Fair this weekend. 

The library was buzzing throughout the day, with a steady crowd of visitors. Fifty schools were in attendance, spread out at booths on all three floors of the library. 

"It's kind of like a college fair," said library spokesperson Courtney Lewis.

DonkeyHotey / Flickr -- CC

After a surprising and emotional election night, how are Kansas Citians feeling today? A look at how the election results fit into their personal stories.

Guests:

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Former Cass County Prosecutor Teresa Hensley, a Democrat, conceded the race for Missouri Attorney General to her Republican opponent Josh Hawley late Tuesday night.

"We have a future that we know is not how we intended it to come out," Hensley told about 40 people at the at the Pipefitters Union Hall in south Kansas City. "But we can't stop working for what we believe in."

It's Election Day. We're taking a trip down memory lane, as we explore the first elections many of us got to participate in: class elections. Whether for elementary schools, high school student council, or college class president, these early elections are an opportunity to practice being members of a democracy.

Guests: 

Courtesy of Anna Cole

It's Election Day, which has us thinking about those times in our childhood when we ran for office, or managed our best friend's campaign. Back when things were simpler ... right?

Wrong, says Anna Cole. 

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

In his third and last stop of the day, Missouri gubernatorial candidate Eric Greitens made a campaign appearance in Kansas City Sunday night, after stops in both Springfield and St. Louis.

In what campaign workers described as one of the more crowded rallies of the day, over 130 people gathered for the event, with women making up about half of the crowd, many holding pink campaign signs reading "Women for Greitens."

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker joined Greitens on the campaign trail.

Todd Sheets started making horror movies in KC in the late 1980s. He stopped after a close friend died at the Catacombs Haunted House. A health scare — a heart attack and quadruple bypass surgery — inspired him, in part, to make movies again. His latest, Dreaming Purple Neon, has its world premiere tomorrow night at Screenland Armour.

Plus, a chat with musician Rachel Mallin, and an encore presentation on lizards.

Guests:

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Story of a Song is a monthly segment on KCUR's Central Standard in which local musicians tell the story behind a song they have written or are performing.

The band: Rachel Mallin and The Wild Type

The song: "White Girls"

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

It’s a cloudy afternoon in Kansas City, Kansas. Officer Kevin Terry buckles up in his old, white cop car before heading out to visit a Head Start preschool. He recently met one of the coordinators at a neighborhood association meeting.

“I told her I would stop by today to talk about a possible ‘stranger danger’ lesson she wants to give to her kids,” Terry says.

Courtesy of Hollis Officer

Do you remember the man who took your tickets at the Tivoli for 17 years? With a recent photo display and theater dedication at the Tivoli, we reflect on the late Bob Smith, an international male model in his prime, who spent the end of his life in Kansas City.

But first, a check-in with the superintendent and a teacher in the Hickman Mills School District, as a part of KCUR's ongoing coverage of the district.

Guests:

Is the gas station central to the Midwestern experience? A look at the proposal that called for removing a street to expand a fuel stop in Westport, plus two bloggers who love QuikTrip so much that they've reviewed the food there.

Guests:

Kansas Citians love their Chiefs. But the game of football has been harshly criticized, for the slew of injuries and the enduring mentality that causes them. We hear from a few people working to change the game, including one UMKC professor who has designed a new football helmet.

Also, ahead of an event at the Black Archives of Mid-America, a local historical tour guide shares stories of the late Felix Payne, an influential man who transformed the political identity of black Kansas Citians in the early 20th-century.

In the U.S., tensions between communities and police seem to be at an all-time high. As we witness trust deteriorating and fear escalating on a national level, what is being done locally — or not being done — to make that relationship between police officers and communities work?

Guests:

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Fall is upon us. And fall marks the arrival of the heralded, beloved pumpkin spice latte.

#PSL.

The pumpkin spice latte was born in 2003, when it made its public debut in a Starbucks in D.C. It sure has grown up a lot since then. The Real PSL now has it’s own Twitter, Instagram and Facebook, where you can actually chat with it. 

A quest to find the pumpkin in pumpkin spice lattes, then KCUR's Food Critics search out the best hot beverages in and around KC.

Guests:

Courtesy of Wasiba Hamad

Exactly six months after 18-year-old Southwest High School honor student Daizsa Bausby was found dead in a motel room, Jackson County prosecutors have charged her father with her murder.

After investigators received positive DNA results, 40-year-old Jerry K. Bausby was charged late Tuesday with first-degree murder, sodomy, incest and sexual abuse.

On the morning of March 21, Daizsa was found by a cleaning crew face up in the bed of a room at the 4 Acres Motel in South Kansas City. The following day, her mother, Laetta Walker-Bausby filed a missing persons report. 

Courtesy of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art

In a new unique three-venue exhibition, the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art brings photography of the late, Cuban-born Jesse A. Fernández to Kansas City. The curator of the exhibition joins us to talk about the work and the life of the artist.

Guest:

Courtesy of LaBudde Special Collections / UMKC

UMKC alumna Jeanne Drewes spent years traveling to Cuba, partnering with Ediciones Vigía, an independent publishing company and collective of book artists in Matanzas, Cuba. Over that time, she amassed a sizeable collection of Cuban books, some of which she recently donated to the LaBudde Special Collections.

In a dimly lit room in Madrid in the late 1700s, a theologian reads aloud to his friend the priest. It's not such a surprising scene, except that just outside, peasants and artisans have pressed their ears up against the door, enraptured by what turned out to be the 18th Century version of . . . pornography.

One KU history professor joins us to share how she discovered this literature, and what it tells us about what ordinary people read during the time.

Guest: 

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Out in Kansas City, Kansas, just off I-70, across from an automotive plant, there's a little blue shack. Above the nondescript, but distinctive building, a sign reads "Jarocho Mariscos y Algo Mas."

Yes, on Kansas Avenue, in the landlocked heart of the United States, you’ll find the smells and tastes of the Gulf of Mexico. And soon, you'll find the same out in South Kansas City.

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