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4:14 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

In A Lab Store Room, An Unsettling Surprise: Lost Vials Of Smallpox

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 5:13 pm

Scientists at the National Institutes of Health made an unpleasant discovery last week as they cleaned out an old laboratory: The lab contained vials of the smallpox virus, previously unknown to authorities. The vials have since been transferred to a secure lab at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.

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The Two-Way
4:10 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Germany Gives Brazil Das Boot With 7-1 Win, Enters World Cup Final

Pretty much sums it up.
Leo Correa AP

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 6:01 pm

Update at 6:08 p.m. ET

Germany steamrolled over host Brazil 7-1 on Tuesday in their semifinal game to enter the final of the 2014 FIFA World Cup. Five of Germany's goals came in the first half.

Thomas Muller scored in the 11th minute, Toni Kroos scored in the 24th and 26th minutes, Miroslav Klose and Sami Khedira scored in the 23rd and 29th minutes, respectively, and Andre Schurrle in the 69th and 79th minutes.

Oscar scored Brazil's consolation goal in the 90th minute.

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All Tech Considered
4:00 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

The Hazards Of Probing The Internet's Dark Side

Journalist Brian Krebs spends time in the dark areas of the Internet, where hackers steal data off credit cards and sell the information in online underground stores. Krebs has learned computer code and how to get onto black market websites and cybercrime networks.
iStockphoto

Late last year, hackers breached Target's data security and stole information from millions of credit cards. Brian Krebs, who writes about cybercrime and computer security for his blog, Krebs on Security, broke the story. A few days later, he broke the story of a credit card breach at Neiman Marcus.

Krebs spends time in the dark areas of the Internet, where hackers steal data off credit cards and sell the information in online underground stores.

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The Salt
3:59 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

3 Kickstarter Food Projects That Leave Potato Salad In The Dirt

Would you pay someone $60,000 to make this?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 9:14 am

Within days of asking for a total of $10 to crowdsource his first potato salad, Ohioan Zack Danger Brown raised tens of thousands of dollars. He promised people he would read their names aloud as he made this salad, which was apparently an irresistible draw.

Being the geeks we are, we asked our NPR Science Desk interns Nicholas St. Fleur and Kara Manke to do a little back-of-the-envelope calculation.

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Shots - Health News
3:57 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

What Looks Like Overcharging By Your Hospital Might Not Be

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 11:10 am

Despite concerns first raised a few years ago, hospitals do not seem to be abusing their electronic data systems to generate bigger bills and boost their income — at least according to authors of a large study released Tuesday. Other leaders in the field say the jury's still out.

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NPR Story
3:28 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Time Travel For The Everyday Adventurer

Petra Mayer shares books that will send their readers spiraling through time. (Alan Cleaver/Flickr)

This summer, consider going on a journey of a different kind – a trip through time.

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NPR Story
3:28 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Baseball Fans Lukewarm To Variable Ticket Prices

Kansas City Royals fans are not taking kindly to new pricing measures for games. (Michael Zupon/Flickr)

Baseball fans in many cities, including Kansas City, can no longer count on the price of single game tickets during the season. Teams are using variable ticket pricing and selling tickets according to projected attendance.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Greg Echlin of KCUR reports that teams are looking at factors including the opposing team, day of the week and who’s on the pitching mound.

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NPR Story
3:28 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Selfies Endanger Tour De France Riders

Zoe Doyle poses for a selfie at Tour de France. (@zoedoyle/Twitter)

The world’s most storied bicycle competition, the Tour de France, has been imperiled by spectators trying to take selfies.

Riders have taken to social media with pleas for fans to show restraint, since fans turning their backs on the race to take photos are unaware of where the riders are and how fast they may be going.

Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Bill Strickland, interim editor of Bicycling magazine about the phenomenon and get his take on this year’s race.

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The Two-Way
3:20 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

1 Out Of 4 Memphis, Tenn., Cops Calls In Sick

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 4:04 pm

About a quarter of the police officers in Memphis have called in sick in an apparent protest over benefit cuts.

As of Tuesday morning, 552 officers were out sick, out of a total force of 2,218, according to the Memphis Commercial Appeal. The "blue flu" numbers have been increasing rapidly in recent days.

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Politics
3:13 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Obama Requests Nearly $4 Billion In Funds To Speed Deportations

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 5:13 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Science
3:13 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Plants Know The Rhythm Of The Caterpillar's Creep

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 5:15 pm

According to new research, plants can actually hear the sounds of insects chewing. A University of Missouri study is the first work to report that plants can recognize the sound of a predator through the vibrations of their leaves. To learn more, Robert Siegel speaks with Heidi Appel, senior research scientist in the Bond Life Sciences Center at the University of Missouri.

Africa
3:13 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Battered By Civil War, South Sudan Falters Toward 3rd Birthday

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 5:13 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Three years ago this was the sound of freedom being celebrated in the world's newest country.

UNIDENTIFIED CROWD: (Singing in foreign language).

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Middle East
3:13 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

In Battle Over Gaza, A Slow Build-up Shows No Signs Of Ending

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 5:13 pm

Israel stepped up its air assault on the Gaza Strip, following the killings of Israeli and Palestinian teens. Unlike air strikes in the past, Israel has tempered its initial show of force for several reasons, but the situation appears to be steadily intensifying.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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News
3:13 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

In Oslo, Attorney General Warns Syria May Be A Cradle Of Terrorism

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 5:13 pm

In a speech in Oslo, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder urged European partners to do more to find and disrupt plans of would-be terrorists who head to Syria — and, once trained, might return to the West.

Latin America
3:13 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

With Default 23 Days Away, A Little Clause Could Cost Argentina Big

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 8:20 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. The clock is ticking for Argentina. Yes, in the World Cup, but here, we're talking about its effort to prevent another debt crisis. Argentina has until the end of this month to pay its bondholders or it risks going into default. As NPR's Jim Zarroli reports, the dispute hinges on one particular clause in the country's debt contracts that could cost the country billions of dollars.

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Shots - Health News
3:12 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Will This Tech Tool Help Manage Older People's Health? Ask Dad

Lively is a sensor that can be attached to a pill box, keys or doors. It lets people know whether aging parents are taking their medicines or sticking to their routines.
Courtesy of Lively

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 10:39 am

Aging 2.0 may not sound like the hippest start-up in San Francisco, but it's part of an industry worth $2 billion and growing fast — technology to help older adults.

Katy Fike, 35, is the company's co-founder. She's devoted to making sure that older adults who are supposed to use the products are involved in their development.

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Shots - Health News
3:10 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

HPV Vaccine Doesn't Raise Risk Of Blood Clots, Study Finds

The vaccine for human papillomavirus has been controversial from the get-go, partly because it protects against a virus that causes cervical cancer and is spread by sexual activity.

The vaccine's safety has also been contested, with media celebrities like Katie Couric publicizing rare reports of people who became ill or died after receiving the vaccine, even though there was no evidence that the vaccine caused the problems.

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Code Switch
2:09 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Miami Stores Enjoy Thriving Business From Cuban Shoppers

Serafin Blanco's discounted clothing store in Hialeah advertises its cheap deals. Cuban customers take their purchases back to Cuba to give to relatives or to sell, Blanco says.
Greg Allen NPR

On the map, it's right next to Miami. But culturally speaking, Hialeah, Fla., is just as close to Havana. And now, more than ever, Cubans are flocking to Hialeah to shop, taking advantage of the relaxed travel restrictions.

"There are more Cubans here than any place besides Cuba," says Serafin Blanco, who owns a discount clothing store there.

Through these shopping expeditions, Cuba's emerging entrepreneurs can buy goods their customers need and can't find in their country — legally skirting the 50-year-old trade embargo.

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Goats and Soda
1:47 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Going, Going, Almost Gone: A Worm Verges On Extinction

Nakal Longolio Acii, 9, had to stay several weeks at a Guinea worm clinic in Eastern Equatoria, South Sudan, while health workers coaxed the parasite out of her leg.
Louise Gubb Courtesy of The Carter Center

Guinea worm is about as close to a real-life Alien event as you can get — a parasitic worm mates inside a person's abdomen, grows up to 3 feet long and then exits (painfully) from a blister.

But the worm's final chapter is near: The world is closer than ever to wiping the parasite off the face of the Earth.

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The Salt
1:42 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

What It Takes To Make A Decent Cup Of Coffee In Space

Leave it to the Italians to design a capsule-based espresso system for astronauts who miss their morning cup.
Andrea Guermani Courtesy of Lavazza

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 3:47 pm

When our pals at the Two-Way wrote last month that engineers had finally come up with a way to brew some good Italian espresso on the International Space Station, we were thoroughly intrigued.

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The Two-Way
1:27 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Case Against Benghazi Suspect Is Complex, Justice Department Says

Ahmed Abu Khattala, an alleged leader of the deadly 2012 attacks on Americans in Benghazi, Libya.
AP

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 2:01 pm

The Justice Department says its case against a man accused in the 2012 attacks on a U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya, is unusually complex and involves "novel questions of fact and law."

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Shots - Health News
12:29 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Smallpox Virus Found In Unsecured NIH Lab

Not something you'd want to find: Smallpox viruses infect a cell.
Science Source

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 11:10 am

Scientists cleaning out an old laboratory on the National Institutes of Health campus in Bethesda, Md., last week came across a startling discovery: vials labeled "variola" — in other words, smallpox.

Under international convention, there are supposed to be only two stashes of this deadly virus: one at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, and another at a similar facility in Russia.

The CDC swooped in to collect the vials and carted them off to a secure lab at its Atlanta headquarters.

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The Two-Way
12:28 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Obama Seeks $3.7B To Handle Immigration Crisis

Detainees sleep in a holding cell at a U.S. Customs and Border Protection processing facility in Brownsville, Texas, on June 18. The White House on Tuesday sought $3.7 billion to deal with the immigration crisis at the border.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 3:12 pm

Update at 3:33 p.m. ET

The White House said it's asking Congress for $3.7 billion to address the humanitarian crisis along the border with Mexico.

The statement said the funds would cover domestic enforcement, repatriation and reintegration of migrants, transportation costs, additional immigration judges, prosecutors and litigation attorneys to "ensure cases are processed fairly and as quickly as possible."

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It's All Politics
12:22 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

GOP Selects Cleveland Over Dallas As 2016 GOP Convention City

The downtown Cleveland skyline on a clear day. The city was selected Tuesday as the recommended location of the Republican National Convention in 2016.
iStockPhoto

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 9:57 am

The Republican Party will hold its 2016 presidential convention in Cleveland, GOP chairman Reince Priebus announced Tuesday.

The GOP chose to locate its nominating event in an expected 2016 battleground state rather than in Dallas, Texas, the sole remaining competitor after Denver and Kansas City were eliminated from consideration in late June.

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News
12:00 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

For Residents, Chicago Violence Is 'Very Personal'

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 12:01 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We're going to begin today in Chicago. Last night, a 19-year-old woman was killed and at least eight others were injured in shootings throughout the city. Now that was just Monday night. Those shootings came after the Fourth of July weekend, during which more than 80 people were shot and at least 14 people were killed.

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Law
11:54 am
Tue July 8, 2014

Is Age The New Frontier Of Voting Rights?

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 12:01 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
11:47 am
Tue July 8, 2014

Police Use Dog To Find Memory And Hard Drives In Search

In June, the 167th Patrol Dog Class graduated from their canine narcotics and electronic media detection training, held by the Connecticut State Police Canine Unit. At far left is Thoreau, who now helps police in Rhode Island find computer hard drives.
Daniel Owen Courtesy of The Hartford Courant

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 1:18 pm

Police in Rhode Island have a secret weapon to fight child pornography: a 2-year-old Labrador named Thoreau, who's been trained to sniff out computer hard drives. The dog is credited with finding a thumb drive that was hidden deep inside a metal cabinet last month.

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Goats and Soda
11:36 am
Tue July 8, 2014

What's In Our Name: Why Goats? Why Soda?

"Goats and Soda: Stories of Life in a Changing World."

That's the name of NPR's new blog, covering health and all sorts of development around the world.

You may be thinking: "Goats? Soda? This blog is going to look at communicable diseases, education struggles, sanitation concerns ... and it's called 'Goats and Soda'?"

We considered many names. A few seemed promising but fell short. Unarrested Development? Globelandia? Up the Road? They were too long, too hard to say on the radio or too vague.

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Goats and Soda
11:32 am
Tue July 8, 2014

Meet The Musicians And Storytellers Of Kenya

Eric Wainaina
Ryan Kellman NPR

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 9:29 am

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The Two-Way
11:26 am
Tue July 8, 2014

Senator Asks U.S. To Investigate Possible Cuban Plot Against Him

New Jersey Democrat Robert Menendez, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, has asked the Justice Department to investigate a smear campaign against him.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 12:46 pm

Did fake accusations that Sen. Robert Menendez had visited underage prostitutes come from Cuba's intelligence agency? That's the question the senator wants the Justice Department to look into.

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