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Author Interviews
2:09 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

Prisoners Of War And Ojibwe Reservation Make Unlikely Neighbors In 'Prudence'

David Treuer is the author of three previous novels and two books of nonfiction, including Rez Life. He also teaches literature and creative writing at the University of Southern California
Jean Luc Bertinin Courtesy of Riverhead Books

David Treuer's latest novel Prudence follows a young man who returns home to visit his family on an Ojibwe reservation before he joins the war as a bombardier. It's the 1940s and a prison camp for Germans captured during World War II has been set up across the river.

Treuer bases the camp on a real-life one that existed near the village of Bena, Minn., on the Leech Lake Reservation where he grew up. The camp was on the shores of Lake Winnibigoshish — the German prisoners used to cut down trees to make roads.

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Book Reviews
2:09 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

Victorian Romance Meets 'House Of Cards' In 'Mr. And Mrs. Disraeli'

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 4:11 pm

A climb "to the top of a greasy pole" are the immortal words coined by 19th century British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli to describe his rise to political power. Disraeli was two-time prime minister under Queen Victoria, as well as a novelist and famous wit whose way with a catchy phrase was rivaled in the 19th century only by his younger admirer, Oscar Wilde. But when he entered politics in the 1830s, Disraeli was burdened by debt and, even more seriously, by his Jewish parentage.

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Movie Interviews
2:09 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

How The Man Behind The Trailers Sparks An Urge To See A Movie

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

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NPR Story
1:42 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

White House Pushes For Tougher Rules On Retirement Funds

Today, the Obama administration is expected to show its support of a Department of Labor proposal about Americans’ retirement savings.

The measure would require brokers to act in their client’s best interest, meaning that it would be harder for them to push people towards high-fee products and funds, but industry officials say it’s unnecessary and could be bad for investors.

Jill Schlesinger of CBS News joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to discuss the proposal and its implications.

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NPR Story
1:42 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

Redesigning Houston's METRO System Without Breaking The Bank

Maps of the existing Houston transit system (left) and the new plan (right). (transitsystemreimagining.com)

While parts of the nation saw serious failures in public transit in the last few weeks, Houston was busy approving a new transit project that would overhaul the entire METRO bus network without increasing operating costs.

The plan seeks to broaden the system, allowing riders to get to most areas of the city without relying on infrequent buses. But that comes with a trade-off: by cutting low-rider routes, some may be left without public transportation.

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NPR Story
1:42 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

Oversight Of Home Caregivers Said To Be Lacking

Toni Giusto keeps a box within reach filled with the pens, paper and letters to keep her busy. (Heidi de Marco/KHN)

With the aging of the U.S. population, more elderly and disabled people than ever are receiving care in their own homes.

In California, the state pays for relatives and other caregivers for low-income residents. The program has a $7 billion budget and serves nearly half a million people.

But there’s concern that there’s not enough oversight to keep people safe. Anna Gorman of Kaiser Health News has the story.

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The Salt
12:48 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

Freight Farms: How Boston Gets Local Greens, Even When Buried In Snow

Freight Farms are shipping containers modified to grow stacks of hydroponic plants and vegetables — anywhere, 365 days a year.
Courtesy of Freight Farms

The United States imports more than $100 billion of food every year from farms across the globe, often in the big metal shipping containers you see on cargo ships. Now, entrepreneurs are using those shipping containers to grow local produce.

"Freight Farms" are shipping containers modified to grow stacks of hydroponic plants and vegetables. It's a new way for small-scale farmers to grow crops year-round in a computer-controlled environment, even in the middle of the city.

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The Two-Way
12:32 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

Australia Announces Security Crackdown Amid 'Rising' Terrorist Threat

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott speaks about his nation's new anti-extremism strategy on Monday in Canberra, Australia.
Rob Griffith AP

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 12:45 pm

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott has introduced a raft of tough new measures aimed at countering what he called the rising threat of terrorism.

Abbott announced the national security crackdown one day after the release of a review of Australia's counterterrrorism operations and a report on a deadly attack in a Sydney cafe in December that left three people dead.

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The Two-Way
12:28 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

Justice Department Appeals Ruling Blocking Obama's Immigration Plan

President Obama speaks about immigration at Del Sol High School in Las Vegas in November, after taking a series of executive actions.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 1:23 pm

The U.S. Justice Department is asking a federal judge to put on hold his ruling that temporarily blocks President Obama's executive action that would protect more than 4 million people in this country illegally from the threat of deportation.

In its motion to stay, the Justice Department said U.S. District Judge Andrew Hanen "lacked authority to issue the preliminary injunction."

Justice Department officials also filed an appeal of Hanen's decision and asked that the executive action move forward while the appeals process is underway.

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The Two-Way
12:03 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

France Seizes Passports Of 6 Allegedly Planning To Join Islamists In Syria

France has seized the passports of six of its citizens who it says were planning to travel to Syria to join Islamist groups fighting in that country's civil war. It's the first time the French government has used a measure that was approved in November to limit the number of French citizens joining Islamist groups in the Middle East.

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The Two-Way
11:21 am
Mon February 23, 2015

Obama Wants Rules That Force Brokers To Put Clients' Interests First

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 2:03 pm

President Obama wants to change the way brokers and investment advisers offer financial advice, saying the current system leads to high fees that erode returns on investments.

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The Two-Way
10:59 am
Mon February 23, 2015

12 Feet: A Soaring New Broad Jump Record Is Set At NFL Combine

University of Connecticut defensive back Byron Jones takes off for the broad jump at the NFL combine Monday. Jones recorded an NFL record of 12 feet 3 inches.
Julio Cortez AP

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 1:10 pm

If you're ever standing near Byron Jones when he jumps, you might want to stand well back. At Monday's NFL scouting combine, the cornerback from the University of Connecticut nearly flew off the grid that measures the standing broad jump. He landed more than 12 feet away.

Jones recorded 12 feet 3 inches in the broad jump, a discipline that was once in the Olympics. No other player came close to Jones' mark at the combine, the scouting event for players who want to be considered in pro football's draft.

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Planet Money
10:53 am
Mon February 23, 2015

50 Years Of Shrinking Union Membership, In One Map

Quoctrung Bui/NPR

Fifty years ago, nearly a third of U.S. workers belonged to a union. Today, it's one in 10. But the decline has not been the same for every state. Here is a map showing how union membership has changed across the country.

A few notes on the map:

  • In 1964, the Midwest was full of manufacturing jobs and had the highest concentration of union workers in America. That has changed dramatically — both because the share of jobs in manufacturing has fallen, and because fewer of the manufacturing jobs that remain are held by union workers.
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The Two-Way
10:09 am
Mon February 23, 2015

Iran Nuclear Talks Report Progress, While Critics Ratchet Up The Rhetoric

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry goes for a stroll along the shore of Lake Geneva on Sunday prior to renewed nuclear negotiations in Geneva with his Iranian counterpart.
Fabrice Coffrini AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 12:23 pm

Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET

U.S. and Iranian negotiators wrapped up nuclear talks in a venerable lakefront luxury hotel in Geneva on Monday, with an American official saying, "We made some progress," but adding, "there's still a long way to go."

The sides are trying to close the gaps in their positions on what the future of Iran's nuclear program should be and when sanctions against Iran might be lifted. The U.S. official says they'll be back at the table next Monday.

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Shots - Health News
9:40 am
Mon February 23, 2015

Administration Bars Health Plans That Won't Cover Hospital Care

Is health insurance that doesn't cover hospital care worth having?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 10:01 am

The Obama administration has blocked health plans without hospital benefits that many large employers argued fulfilled their obligations under the Affordable Care Act.

Companies with millions of workers, mainly in lower-wage industries such as staffing, retailing, restaurants and hotels that hadn't offered health coverage previously, had been flocking toward such insurance for 2015.

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The Two-Way
9:34 am
Mon February 23, 2015

Honda's President Resigns, After A Troubled Year For Carmaker

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 10:32 am

Honda Motor Co., which has struggled with an air bag safety recall and a sales slump, will get a new chief executive this year. Takanobu Ito, who has led Honda since 2009, will leave in June, giving way to Takahiro Hachigo, an executive who began his career as an engineer.

Ito, who has worked at Honda since the late 1970s, will reportedly remain with the company both as an advisor and as a board member. Announcing the move Monday, Honda did not connect Ito's move to the carmaker's recent problems, which range from safety issues to lackluster sales.

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Michel Martin, Going There
8:48 am
Mon February 23, 2015

Becoming American: Immigrants Tweet Their Stories

Writer Edwidge Danticat at around 10 years-old with her brother Bob and cousin Nick in Haiti. She joined her parents in the U.S. a couple of years later. She describes it as a tough landing.
Edwidge Danticat

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 3:51 pm

Immigration is a subject of intense political debate but it is also the subject of great art. For centuries, American writers and performers of all backgrounds have grappled with what it means to cross land and water — sometimes by choice, sometimes not — to take up life in a new world.

On Feb. 24, I will be joined in Miami by some of the country's most exciting young writers and performers who have also made such journeys and who have taken up the vital task of telling us what it means.

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The Two-Way
8:46 am
Mon February 23, 2015

Egyptian Court Orders Prominent Activist Jailed For 5 Years

Relatives and supporters of Egyptian activist Alaa Abdel Fattah react after Monday's verdict in a trial over an illegal protest.
Khaled Desouki AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 6:56 pm

A Cairo criminal court has sentenced prominent Egyptian blogger Alaa Abdel Fattah to five years in jail for violating a controversial law that bans unlicensed protests.

Another activist, Ahmed Abdul Rahman, was also sentenced to five years on Monday. Eighteen other people were given three years, and several tried in absentia got 15 years.

As the judge read out his verdict, the courtroom erupted in protest.

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Movies
8:38 am
Mon February 23, 2015

Oscars Get Political, As Acceptance Speeches Wade Into Social Issues

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 2:02 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
8:16 am
Mon February 23, 2015

The Oscars: What People Are Saying The Day After

Oscar winners J.K. Simmons (best supporting actor), Patricia Arquette (best supporting actress), Julianne Moore (best actress), and Eddie Redmayne (best actor) pose with their trophies, after an awards show that was heavy on advocacy messages.
Jordan Strauss Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 12:16 pm

Along with learning who won an Oscar at last night's Academy Awards, we learned a lot more: Who to call (your parents), and what women should be paid (the same as men). From civil rights to immigration and health issues such as Alzheimer's and Lou Gehrig's diseases, advocacy was a big part of last night's show. Here's a quick rundown of what people are saying Monday.

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Asia
6:27 am
Mon February 23, 2015

Obama Tree Isn't Dead; It Just Looks That Way

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 6:52 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
6:22 am
Mon February 23, 2015

Fake IDs Backfire On Pa. College Students

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 10:25 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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The Two-Way
6:04 am
Mon February 23, 2015

Ukraine Says It Can't Withdraw Weapons, Citing Attacks During Truce

Ukrainian troops ride on self-propelled artillery near Artemivsk, eastern Ukraine, Monday. A Ukrainian military spokesman says that separatist attacks are delaying Ukrainian forces' pullback of heavy weapons from the front line.
Evgeniy Maloletka AP

Noting deadly attacks by Russian-backed separatists who have renewed a push near the southern port city of Mariupol, Ukraine says it can't withdraw heavy weapons from the front lines, as required by a week-old cease-fire.

"Ukraine's military says two government soldiers were killed and about 10 wounded in the past 24 hours," NPR's Corey Flintoff reports from Moscow. "A government spokesman say its positions were hit by shelling 27 times in the past day. Meanwhile, of course, the separatists are claiming that the government initiates the attacks."

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Business
5:17 am
Mon February 23, 2015

White House Moves To Protect Investors From Bad Retirement Advice

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 4:51 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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NPR Story
4:54 am
Mon February 23, 2015

Wil Smith, Single Dad And Beloved StoryCorps Participant, Dies At 46

Wil Smith visited StoryCorps with his daughter, Olivia, in Sheffield, Mass.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 5:50 pm

Wil Smith, a single dad whom listeners first met through StoryCorps in 2012, died Sunday at the age of 46. A few years ago he was diagnosed with colon cancer.

Smith attended Bowdoin College in Maine in the 1990s. When he enrolled, he was not just older than the other students, but was also raising his infant daughter, Olivia, on his own.

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NPR Story
4:02 am
Mon February 23, 2015

Homeland Security Warns Of Terrorist Threats Against U.S. Malls

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 10:25 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
4:02 am
Mon February 23, 2015

'Birdman,' Julianne Moore, Eddie Redmayne Win Big Oscar Prizes

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 10:25 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
4:02 am
Mon February 23, 2015

New Hospital Buildings Define Future Of Health Care

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 10:25 am

Copyright 2015 KERA Unlimited. To see more, visit http://www.kera.org/.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
4:02 am
Mon February 23, 2015

When Kids Think Parents Play Favorites, It Can Spell Trouble

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 10:21 am

If you have siblings, you probably think that your parents liked one kid best — and you're probably right. Scientists say the family pecking order does affect children, but not always in the way you might think.

The vast majority of parents do have favorite child, according to research — about 80 percent. But that number sounds pretty darned high. So I decided to ask some kids in my neighborhood in Bethesda, Md., what they think happens in their families.

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U.S.
4:02 am
Mon February 23, 2015

Immigration Courts 'Operating In Crisis Mode,' Judges Say

People in Miami protest the Texas district judge who on Tuesday temporarily blocked the implementation of President Obama's executive actions on immigration.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 12:54 pm

As Congress debates the fate of President Obama's immigration policies, the nation's immigration court system is bogged down in delays exacerbated by the flood of unaccompanied minors who crossed the southern border last summer.

The administration made it a priority for those cases to be heard immediately. As a result, hundreds of thousands of other cases have been delayed until as late as 2019.

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