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Movie Reviews
11:15 am
Wed May 16, 2012

'The Dictator' Rules With A Satirist's Fist

Sacha Baron Cohen plays Admiral General Aladeen, the authoritarian, anti-Semitic and unexpectedly sympathetic protagonist of The Dictator.
Melinda Sue Gordon Paramount Pictures

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 12:30 pm

Many fans will be disappointed that Sacha Baron Cohen's The Dictator is a more or less conventional comedy and not an ambush-interview mockumentary in the style of Borat and Bruno. But that guerrilla-clown shtick would be tough to sustain: Why not let him try something else? The good news is that The Dictator is loose and slap-happy and full of sharp political barbs and has funny actors moving in and out — and at a lickety-split 83 minutes, it doesn't wear out its welcome.

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Planet Money
11:14 am
Wed May 16, 2012

How Facebook Can Live Up To The Hype

Lam Thuy Vo / NPR

Facebook will be valued at about $100 billion when it goes public this week. What would it take for that valuation to be justified?

As we noted yesterday, the value of a typical big, public company is 15 times the company's annual profit. So a company valued at $30 billion would typically have annual profits of $2 billion.

Facebook will be valued at 100 times its current annual profits. That's because investors expect the company's profits to go through the roof in the coming years.

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It's All Politics
11:00 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Biden On Bain: Romney 'Thinks This Experience Will Help Our Economy'?

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 1:30 pm

The Obama campaign on Wednesday escalated its attack on Mitt Romney's business career, with Vice President Joe Biden scheduled to aggressively question how Romney's management of Bain Capital might translate into running the U.S. economy.

On Monday, Obama's re-election campaign unveiled a new swing state ad questioning Romney's assertion that he was a job creator while running the private equity firm. The Romney campaign countered later in the day with its own ad.

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The Salt
10:51 am
Wed May 16, 2012

From Science Fiction To Fact, Robots Are Coming To A Farm Near You

Brent Ware, a member of the robotics team at Kansas State, stands next to a planting robot that won a national competition.
Jeremy Bernfeld Harvest Public Media

Originally published on Wed January 29, 2014 1:59 pm

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Shots - Health Blog
10:35 am
Wed May 16, 2012

FDA Delays Sunscreen Label Redo

Alivia Parker, 21 months at the time, ran through circles of spraying water on a hot day in Montgomery, Ala., last June. She was wearing sunscreen with an SPF of 100, a rating that won't be allowed much longer.
Dave Martin AP

For a little while longer you'll still be able to buy suncreen labeled as waterproof or with a sun protection factor of 100.

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Law
10:30 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Is There Racial Bias In Clemency Decisions?

Nearly 20 years ago Clarence Aaron was sentenced to three life terms for his involvement in a drug deal. His request to have his sentence shortened was denied by the White House in 2008. Now a story by ProPublica's Dafna Linzer reports the Bush administration was not told key facts before deciding on it. Host Michel Martin speaks with Linzer.

Author Interviews
10:24 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Just What's Inside Those Breasts?

Breasts are getting bigger and arriving earlier. They're also attracting chemicals and environmental toxins, which are getting passed along in breast milk.
Photographer: B-D-S iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu May 17, 2012 12:31 pm

When writer Florence Williams was nursing her second child, she read a research study about toxins found in human breast milk. She decided to test her own breast milk and shipped a sample to a lab in Germany.

What came back surprised her.

Trace amounts of pesticides, dioxin and a jet fuel ingredient — as well as high to average levels of flame retardants — were all found in her breast milk. How could something like this happen?

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The Two-Way
10:23 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Neither John Edwards Nor His Mistress Will Testify At Corruption Trial

John Edwards as he entered the Federal Courthouse in Greensboro, N.C., this morning.
Sara D. Davis Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 11:31 am

The campaign corruption trial of former Democratic presidential contender John Edwards will not reach a dramatic climax with testimony from the former senator or the mistress he's accused of trying to hide with 2008 campaign funds.

According to The Associated Press, Edwards' attorneys said in court today that they will not be calling Edwards or Rielle Hunter to the stand and that they expect to rest their case later today.

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The Two-Way
9:36 am
Wed May 16, 2012

9-Year-Old To Westboro Baptist Protesters: 'God Hates No One'

Josef Miles, making his own statement.
Patty Akrouche Facebook.com/FeverDreams

Originally published on Thu May 17, 2012 9:42 am

Patty Akrouche says she's "never been prouder" of her 9-year-old son, Josef Miles, than she was this past weekend.

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The Two-Way
9:20 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Bush Says 'I'm For Mitt Romney,' But He Likely Won't Play Role In Campaign

Back in 2006: Then-President George W. Bush and then-Gov. Mitt Romney
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 9:47 am

"I'm for Mitt Romney."

With four words, said to an ABC News reporter as an elevator's doors closed, former President George W. Bush on Tuesday confirmed what was pretty obvious — he is supporting his fellow Republican's bid for the White House.

But as The Associated Press reports:

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Remembrances
8:04 am
Wed May 16, 2012

A Fleeting Memory Of Carlos Fuentes

Mexican write Carlos Fuentes at the Hay Festival Cartagena in January.
Claudio Rubio AP

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 3:43 pm

When I heard that the Mexican literary legend Carlos Fuentes died Tuesday at 83, I remembered a long, easygoing interview I did with him years ago. We talked about many things — including what epitaph he wanted carved on his tombstone.

It was the autumn of 1995 and I was a reporter at The Washington Post, assigned to write a profile of the elegant, eloquent Fuentes. I draw on that story now, for twice-told tales worth telling.

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The Two-Way
8:02 am
Wed May 16, 2012

At Trial, Serb Gen. Mladic Taunts Survivors With Throat-Cutting Gesture

Former Bosnian Serb Gen. Ratko Mladic at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in The Hague earlier today.
Toussaint Kluiters AFP/Getty Images

"Bosnian Serb Gen. Ratko Mladic taunted Srebrenica survivors on Wednesday at the start of his trial for genocide, running his hand across his throat in a gesture of defiance to relatives of the worst massacre in Europe since World War II," Reuters writes from The Hague.

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The Two-Way
7:47 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Is Housing Sector Getting Better? Increase In Starts May Signal It Is

A home construction site in Westport, Conn., last December.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

There was a 2.6 percent increase in housing starts in April from March, the Census Bureau and Department of Housing and Urban Development just reported.

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The Two-Way
7:22 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Greece Sets New Election For June 17; Fear Of Bank Runs Reported

With "the shockwaves from Greece's failure to form a coalition government" continuing to roil financial markets around the world, there's word from the BBC that Greece has now scheduled a new set of elections for June 17.

And there's also this:

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The Two-Way
6:43 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Folks Seem To Like It, So Facebook Boosts Size Of Stock Offering By 25 Percent

Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 7:20 am

The hoopla continues over Facebook's initial public offering of stock, with word that the social media giant has increased the size of Friday's IPO by 25 percent.

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The Two-Way
6:13 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Medical Report Details George Zimmerman's Injuries, ABC News Says

George Zimmerman during a court appearance on April 20.
Gary W. Green AP
  • Cheryl Corley, reporting for the NPR Newscast

George Zimmerman had a broken nose, black eyes, cuts on the back of his head and a minor back injury the day after he shot and killed Florida teenager Trayvon Martin, according to medical records compiled by his doctor, ABC News reports.

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Around the Nation
5:59 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Fischer, Kerrey Win Senate Primary In Nebraska

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Some other news. Yesterday was primary day in Nebraska and voters delivered a surprise. Both parties were choosing candidates for a Senate race.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And the Republican primary started with a pattern that has become familiar. The leading candidate was backed by traditional Republican leaders but was challenged by another candidate with Tea Party support and a lot of outside money.

INSKEEP: It became a fierce campaign, but here's where the pattern was broken. Neither contender won.

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Law
5:54 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Juror Booted From Clemens Trial For Sleeping

At the perjury trial of pitching great Roger Clemens Tuesday, a judge sent a jury member home after saying she was "obviously sleeping." She's the second juror to fall asleep and be ordered to leave.

Around the Nation
5:47 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Restaurant Runs Out Of All-You-Can-Eat Fish

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Economy
5:47 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Debt Ceiling Debate Is Revived In Washington

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

If you thought the two political parties had moved past their differences over the debt ceiling, think again.

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Business
4:23 am
Wed May 16, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 6:25 am

Fragrances for the man candles include Riding Mower, which smells like freshly cut grass, and First Down, which has the smell of orange and leather.

NPR Story
3:52 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Appeals Court Moves Toward Identifying Donors

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 5:47 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

OK. So that's the budget money. Let's talk about political contributions. The laws governing political money have just become a little bit more convoluted. But this time, the new twist could actually mean more disclosure. We'd find out the names of the big donors who finance attack ads.

NPR's Peter Overby reports.

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NPR Story
3:52 am
Wed May 16, 2012

The Latest On Greece's Financial Crisis

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 5:47 am

Greece will hold new elections next month after leaders failed to form a government this week. The political uncertainty has raised fears that the heavily indebted country will be forced to exit the eurozone.

NPR Story
3:52 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Certain Ford Retirees Face Major Pension Decision

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 8:05 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And now to big money that's tied up in a company's pension fund. Tens of thousands of white-collar Ford retirees will soon have a big decision to make: Should they stay in the auto company's pension plan, or take their chances with a lump sum payout instead? The offer is believed to be the first of its kind for such a large, ongoing pension fund.

Michigan Radio's Lindsey Smith reports.

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NPR Story
3:52 am
Wed May 16, 2012

'Cloud City': Like Walking Inside A Kaleidoscope

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 6:04 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In New York City, there's a new structure taking shape high above Central Park.

ANNE STRAUSS: Once we started to hoist the modules with an enormous crane, people became aware of it. You can see if from great distances.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

That's Anne Strauss, an associate curator at the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art. She's talking about a new exhibit in the Met's rooftop garden called "Cloud City."

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NPR Story
3:52 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Majority Of Shareholders Still Support JPMorgan Chase

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 5:47 am

JPMorgan Chase hosted its annual shareholder meeting in Tampa Tuesday, and it was the first chance for shareholders to weigh in on the banks problems. News the bank lost at least $2 billion in a botched trading strategy gave fresh fodder to critics who want banks to be more tightly regulated.

NPR Story
3:52 am
Wed May 16, 2012

International Travelers Welcome Atlanta's New Air Terminal

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 5:47 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A new international terminal opens today at the Atlanta Airport. Hartsfield-Jackson International is already the busiest airport in the world. And the new terminal reflects a big by the business capital of the South to become a bigger global player. Georgia wants to attract more international business. NPR's Kathy Lohr has the story.

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Planet Money
2:20 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Pizza Delicious Bought An Ad On Facebook. How'd It Do?

Pizza Delicious
Nick Sherman Flickr

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 8:38 am

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The Fracking Boom: Missing Answers
2:04 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Medical Records Could Yield Answers On Fracking

William Reigle has fibrosis, a disease that may be aggravated by nearby fracking. He's one of more than 2 million Pennsylvanians who get their health care from Geisinger Health System. The system wants to use its extensive database of patient records to study the health impact of natural gas production.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:50 am

A proposed study of people in northern Pennsylvania could help resolve a national debate about whether the natural gas boom is making people sick.

The study would look at detailed health histories on hundreds of thousands of people who live near the Marcellus Shale, a rock formation in which energy companies have already drilled about 5,000 natural gas wells.

If the study goes forward, it would be the first large-scale, scientifically rigorous assessment of the health effects of gas production.

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London 2012: The Summer Olympics
2:03 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Gymnast's Journey: Toddler Tumbler To Golden Girl

Aly Raisman practices on the balance beam at the 2012 American Cup at Madison Square Garden in New York. She placed second in the all-around portion of the event.
Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 5:47 am

Aly Raisman started gymnastics like millions of other children — in a toddler tumbling class. Now 17, the Massachusetts athlete is considered one of the best tumblers in the world. And she's on track to make the 2012 U.S. Olympic gymnastics team.

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