NPR News

Pages

The Two-Way
7:14 am
Thu July 5, 2012

KABOOM! San Diego's Entire Fireworks Show Ignites At Once

Oops. A "premature ignition" in San Diego sent an entire fireworks show off at once.
YouTube.com

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 4:08 pm

Here's what it looks like when about 18-minutes worth of professional fireworks all go up at once.

As the San Diego Union-Tribune says, the "city's big kaboom ka-bombed on Wednesday night."

Read more
The Two-Way
6:42 am
Thu July 5, 2012

Romney Says Mandate's A Tax, But Also Sides With Justices Who Say It's Not

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney participates during the Wolfeboro, N.H., Independence Day parade on Wednesday.
Kayana Szymczak Getty Images
  • Josh Rogers of New Hampshire Public Radio on 'Morning Edition'

There are many stories this morning about what Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney said to CBS News on Wednesday. The conventional wisdom is that he reversed his own campaign's view to say that the so-called individual mandate in the 2010 health care overhaul is a tax, not a penalty.

There's attention being paid to what he said to CBS because many in the news media, such as The Associated Press, conclude that:

Read more
Around the Nation
5:53 am
Thu July 5, 2012

Tweeted Picture Helps Owner Find Lost Dog

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:25 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Twitter is going to the dogs. Yesterday, Patch, a Jack Russell terrier, boarded a train near Dublin. When the train staff discovered him, they posted his picture on Twitter. It was re-tweeted more than 500 times. Within a half hour, his owner saw the photo and tweeted: That's my dog. Then she opened a Twitter account for Patch, in case he should go missing again. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

Around the Nation
5:42 am
Thu July 5, 2012

VA Hospital Recuits Mental Health Providers

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:25 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

The Department of Veterans Affairs is adding staff to its hospitals to meet the mental health needs of vets of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. As Erin Toner of WUWM in Milwaukee reports, some clinicians say the help cannot come soon enough.

ERIN TONER, BYLINE: The VA hospital in Milwaukee is a hectic place. On most mornings you have to circle the parking lots over and over to find a spot. Luckily there's valet service if patients would rather leave the parking to someone else.

Read more
Around the Nation
5:42 am
Thu July 5, 2012

Proud Dad Ordered To Take Down Huge Sign

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:25 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Business
3:46 am
Thu July 5, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:25 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with the back story on VIP loans.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

WERTHEIMER: A former mortgage company, Countrywide, used a VIP loan program to buy influence with members of Congress, staffers and other officials, including a number at Fannie Mae, the government backed mortgage giant central to Countrywide's business. That the bottom line of a new report out today from the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Read more
Around the Nation
3:46 am
Thu July 5, 2012

Power Outages Darken Many July 4 Celebrations

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:25 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On the day after the Fourth, it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

It was especially easy for some Americans to see the fireworks last night. They had no competing source of light.

INSKEEP: Brilliant displays lit up cities like New York and Washington, but across Maryland, Virginia and New Jersey, about a quarter of a million homes still have no electricity.

Read more
Election 2012
3:46 am
Thu July 5, 2012

Romney: Obama's Health Mandate Is A Tax

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney walks with his wife, Ann, and other family members, along with Republican Sen. Kelly Ayotte, in the Wolfeboro, N.H., Independence Day parade Wednesday. Ayotte has been mentioned as a possible vice presidential contender.
Kayana Szymczak Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:25 pm

Republican presidential challenger Mitt Romney spent his July Fourth holiday marching in a New Hampshire parade, and backtracking statements a top adviser made about the individual mandate in the Obama health care law.

There was something for almost everybody in Wolfeboro's Independence Day parade: a local brass band, bonnet-wearing Daughters of the American Revolution, a Zumba instructor shimmying across the bed of a pickup truck, and even a Jimmy Durante impersonator, complete with prosthetic nose.

Read more
NPR Story
3:42 am
Thu July 5, 2012

EX-Barclays CEO Apologizes To British Panel

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:25 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

In Britain today, parliament continues its hearing on the interest rate scandal at Barclays Bank. This week, several of the bank's top executives resigned, including the chief executive, Bob Diamond. Yesterday, parliamentarians quizzed Diamond for three hours.

NPR's Philip Reeves is in London, where he says outrage is growing.

Read more
Southword
2:15 am
Thu July 5, 2012

Meet Al Black: Florida's Prison Painter

Al Black is one of Florida's 26 officially recognized "Highwaymen" — a loosely affiliated group of artists who began painting in the 1960s, some of whom are still at it today.
Courtesy of Gary Monroe

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:25 pm

In the 1960s, Al Black could be found cruising up and down Route 1 in his blue-and-white Ford Galaxy — with a trunk full of wet landscape paintings.

At the time, he was a salesman who could snatch your breath away and sell it back to you. As artist Mary Ann Carroll puts it, he could "sell a jacket to a mosquito in summer."

"A salesman is a con-man," Black readily admits himself today. He's a storyteller. And does he have stories to tell.

Read more
Revolutionary Road Trip
2:13 am
Thu July 5, 2012

In Libya's Shifting Sands, Kids Try To Find Their Way

Three students outside the Science College of Benghazi University. They say they expect to have opportunities in Libya that would not have been possible when Moammar Gadhafi was in power.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:25 pm

In a stretch of sandy wasteland, Hisham Sadowi, 12, smacks a tee shot across a makeshift golf course in Benghazi, Libya.

On this course with no grass, local rules allowed him to place the ball on a little square of artificial turf he carries around.

Hisham dreams of becoming a professional golfer, and he stops briefly to speak to us. We asked him who his favorite golfer is.

"Tiger Woods," he exclaims.

Read more
Dead Stop
2:13 am
Thu July 5, 2012

Beyond The Music In St. Louis Cemetery No. 2

Ernie K-Doe poses outside his Mother-In-Law Lounge during Jazz Fest in New Orleans in 2001. He died a few months later and was buried in St. Louis Cemetery No. 2.
Pat Jolly AP

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:25 pm

There's so much water in, around and underneath New Orleans, that the dead spend eternity in tombs above ground.

Most of the tombs now have a similar design: On top, there's space for a wooden coffin or two, and at the bottom lies a potpourri of decanted family remains. Sooner or later, whoever is up high must vacate and settle lower, making room for the newly dead. That's how families stay together — in a desiccated jumble of grandpas, grandmas, siblings and cousins.

Read more
Around the Nation
2:09 am
Thu July 5, 2012

New Orleans Struggles With Murder Rate, And Trust

Sgt. Miro Brekalo talks with residents in New Orleans' Gentilly neighborhood, as other officers walk their beat. Their goal isn't only to stop crime; it's also to connect with citizens who are often reluctant to report crimes.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:25 pm

New Orleans now has the highest per capita murder rate in the country. Most of the killings are concentrated in the city's poorest neighborhoods — places like Central City, just a few blocks north of the stately mansions that line St. Charles Avenue.

The city's mayor is launching a new program aimed at cracking what he describes as a deeply rooted culture of violence. But victims complain that a failed criminal justice system has left the streets to vigilante justice, with innocent residents caught in the crossfire.

A Wounded Neighborhood

Read more
Around the Nation
2:07 am
Thu July 5, 2012

'Black Eden,' The Town That Segregation Built

The Idlewild Club House, Idlewild, Mich., September 1938.
Robert Abbott Sengstacke Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:25 pm

Sometimes history is made in the most unlikely of places.

This summer, the community of Idlewild, Mich., once known as America's "Black Eden," is celebrating its centennial — and its place in American history.

Located about 30 miles east of the larger resort city of Ludington, tucked away in the woods of the Huron-Manistee National Forests, the town was once a go-to spot for summer vacations. It was a resort unlike any other in the United States, however, and was, in essence, the town that segregation built.

Read more
Planet Money
2:06 am
Thu July 5, 2012

The Farmer And The Commerce Clause

The U.S. Supreme Court, 70 years after rejecting Roscoe Filburn's bid to limit the federal government's power to regulate commerce.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:25 pm

Last week's Supreme Court ruling on the health care law might have made Roscoe Filburn a little happier.

Filburn was an Ohio dairy farmer who had a beef with the federal government, one he took to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1942. He lost.

Read more
Politics
2:05 am
Thu July 5, 2012

Ohio Senator Vulnerable For Health Law Support

Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown speaks in Columbus, Ohio, in May. Brown, who is up for re-election this year, says he wakes up every day "trying to figure out how to create jobs."
Mark Duncan AP

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:25 pm

President Obama hits the campaign trail Thursday with a bus tour in Ohio. The state is a crucial battleground not only for the presidential election, but also because it could decide whether Democrats keep control of the Senate.

Up for re-election there is Democrat Sherrod Brown, who is being challenged by the state's Republican treasurer, Josh Mandel. Mandel is highlighting Brown's staunch support of the new health care law — with a big assist from outside groups.

Read more
Business
3:03 pm
Wed July 4, 2012

Fear Of Fires Fizzles Some July Fourth Fireworks Fun

Susan Underwood prices fireworks, while her husband Michael (left) and Clint Simmons pace themselves with a snack and TV last month at their tent along Highway 416 in Sevier County, Tenn. Over in Middle Tennessee, the drought has led city leaders to ban fireworks this year.
Curt Habraken AP

Originally published on Wed July 4, 2012 3:59 pm

Freddie Bowers and his dad, Larry, have sold fireworks in LaVergne, Tenn., for a lifetime. But, the sparklers are off limits this year since the region has had the hottest streak in recorded history and several small fires in the area have been blamed on fireworks.

For people in the fireworks business, Christmas usually comes in July. Only this year, three-quarters of the country are experiencing some level of drought and from the Mountain West to the Southeast, cities are temporarily banning fireworks.

Read more
Business
2:37 pm
Wed July 4, 2012

Ex-CEO: Barclays Isn't The Only Bank At Fault

Former Barclays CEO Bob Diamond leaves Parliament amid a crowd of reporters in London on Wednesday. Diamond, who resigned Tuesday, was questioned about a growing interest-rate manipulation scandal.
Matthew Lloyd Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 4, 2012 4:35 pm

The fallen leader of Barclays Bank got on the hot seat before members of the British Parliament on Wednesday. Robert Diamond, an American, resigned Tuesday as CEO of the bank — the latest executive to lose his job over an interest-rate manipulation scandal.

The scandal has not only consumed Barclays, it also threatens to engulf other international banks — and high-ranking government officials, too.

Diamond started his career at Barclays on Independence Day, exactly 16 years ago. On Wednesday in London, he set off some fireworks all his own.

Read more
Sports
2:01 pm
Wed July 4, 2012

Baseball's Teen Phenom Steals Home, And Hearts

Washington Nationals' Bryce Harper walks out of the clubhouse before an interleague baseball game in Baltimore.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Wed July 4, 2012 3:03 pm

Bryce Harper was 16 when he appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated, pictured swinging a bat in the desert and declared "Baseball's Chosen One."

Read more
Middle East
12:55 pm
Wed July 4, 2012

Medical Marijuana Use Sprouting In Israel

Moshe Rute smokes cannabis at the Hadarim nursing home in Kibutz Naan, Israel. In conjunction with Israel's Health Ministry, the Tikkun Olam company is distributing cannabis for medicinal purposes to more than 1,800 people in Israel.
Uriel Sinai Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 8, 2012 7:33 am

Israel has become a world leader in the use of medical marijuana. More than 10,000 patients have received government licenses to consume the drug to treat ailments such as cancer and chronic pain.

But while the unorthodox treatment has gained acceptance in Israel, it still has its critics.

Susan Malkah breathes in the cloud of smoke from a plastic inhaler especially formulated for medical marijuana use. She has a number of serious ailments and is confined to a wheelchair.

Read more
Arts & Life
11:24 am
Wed July 4, 2012

The Highwaymen: Segregation And Speed-Painting In The Sunshine State

Courtesy of Gary Monroe

Originally published on Wed July 4, 2012 3:03 pm

In the 1960s and '70s, if you were in a doctor's office, or a funeral home, or a motel in Florida, chances are a landscape painting hung on the wall. Palms arching over the water, or moonlight on an inlet. Tens of thousands of paintings like this were created by a group of self-taught African-American artists, concentrated in Fort Pierce, Fla.

Read more
Science
11:08 am
Wed July 4, 2012

New Subatomic Particle May Be Physics' 'Missing Link'

This graphic depicts a proton-proton collision from the search for the Higgs boson particle.
CERN AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 6:51 am

Scientists have discovered a new subatomic particle with profound implications for understanding our universe. On Wednesday, they announced they've found a particle believed to be the long-awaited Higgs boson. Nicknamed the "God particle," it represents the final piece in a theory that explains the basic nature of our universe.

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
9:17 am
Wed July 4, 2012

Picking The Right Shades: How To Protect Your Peepers

Brazilian shoppers try on sunglasses at a store in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., in March.
Felipe Dana AP

Originally published on Wed July 4, 2012 9:18 am

Summer sun means blistering hot temperatures and wilted gardens. And it also means that ultraviolet rays are out in full force.

Besides slathering on the right sunscreen to safeguard your skin, you also need to protect your eyes from blasts of UV light.

Read more
Science
9:13 am
Wed July 4, 2012

When It Comes To Invention, This Guy Was No Rube

Goldberg gave up life as a sewer engineer to dream big.
Courtesy of rubegoldberg.com

As we celebrate all things American on the Fourth of July, we often remember the great minds that have shaped our nation's history.

But this afternoon, as you're devising new techniques to get slow-moving ketchup from the bottle to your hot dog, you're also celebrating the birthday of another innovative American: Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Rube Goldberg.

Read more
Around the Nation
6:23 am
Wed July 4, 2012

A Cheesy Twist On This Indpendence Day

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with a cheesy twist on Independence Day. A replica of Mount Rushmore is on display today in West Palm Beach, Florida. This version is carved out as a 640-pound block of cheddar cheese. It was sculpted by Troy Landwehr, an expert cheese carver from, of course, Wisconsin. He told the Sun Sentinel that Abraham Lincoln's bushy eyebrows were one of the hardest features to carve. His creation is titled "My Country 'Tis of Cheese." It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
6:17 am
Wed July 4, 2012

Woman Flees Accident Scene To Chill Her Ice Cream

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. An Arkansas woman high-tailed it home after she rear-ended another car in Van Buren. It didn't take long for police to find her. When they did, they slapped her with a citation for following too closely and leaving the scene of an accident. Her excuse? She didn't think there was enough damage to call the cops and she was afraid her ice cream was melting. A bit of a messy alibi. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Asia
5:26 am
Wed July 4, 2012

Pakistan Will Reopen NATO Supply Lines

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Pakistan and the United States have reached agreement to reopen the strategic land supply routes from Pakistan into Afghanistan. Pakistan closed those routes last November after a U.S. attack left 24 Pakistani soldiers dead. Pakistan had wanted a formal apology from the U.S. but the administration refused because it believed American troops had come under fire first from the Pakistani side. But yesterday, Secretary of State Clinton made comments that finally broke the logjam.

NPR's Mike Shuster has more from Islamabad.

Read more
Business
4:52 am
Wed July 4, 2012

Ex-Barclays CEO To Appear Before British Panel

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a U.K. interest rate probe.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

WERTHEIMER: The former chief executive of Barclays is testifying before a parliamentary committee in Britain. Bob Diamond, who resigned yesterday, is being asked about the rate-setting scandal at the bank. He told lawmakers in the hearing today that it was an unfortunate series of events. Yesterday, Barclays released documents suggesting a Bank of England official may have pressured Barclays to lower its rates. NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

Read more
Research News
4:08 am
Wed July 4, 2012

Physicists Find Evidence Of New Subatomic Particle

Originally published on Wed July 4, 2012 8:29 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Good morning.

Read more
Around the Nation
4:08 am
Wed July 4, 2012

'Flipping' Sneakers Is Highly Profitable

Originally published on Wed July 4, 2012 6:00 am

Maybe you won't pay several hundred dollars for a pair of sneakers, but there are a lot of people who will — providing they are the right sneakers. The demand for certain models has spawned a robust market for re-sellers — people who buy up the available supply and re-sell them for a profit.

Pages