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The Salt
3:56 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

A Second Helping Of Pie Week: How Pumpkin Pie Turned My Life Around

Pumpkin pie to the rescue?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 8:57 pm

Yes, we know, Pie Week is officially over, and we already commemorated your contributions to it with our Storify post on Friday. But one more irresistible pie story came across the transom that we just had to share.

So without further ado, here's NPR listener Marie Metivier-DeMasters' story about how pie changed her life, which we received by email and edited a bit for length and clarity:

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It's All Politics
3:40 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Taxes, Jobs And Jabs: Obama And Romney Slug It Out In Swing States

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 3:57 pm

President Obama campaigned in Iowa on Tuesday, promoting his plan to extend the Bush-era tax cuts for those who make under $250,000 a year — but not for more wealthy Americans.

Republican Mitt Romney was in another swing state, Colorado, hitting a new Republican charge that some of Obama's policies have helped create jobs overseas at the expense of the domestic job market.

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The Two-Way
3:21 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Reports: Google, FTC Will Settle Over Safari Privacy Breach

According to several news report, Google and the Federal Trade Commission are close to reaching an agreement over charges of a privacy breach.

The Wall Street Journal reports that the tentative deal would have Google pay $22.5 million over charges that it bypassed the privacy settings of users of Apple's Safari web browser.

The Journal reports:

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Europe
3:12 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

'Vultures' Swoop In For Deals In Debt-Ridden Spain

A "For Sale" sign hangs outside mostly empty apartment blocks in the Madrid satellite town of Sesena in February. Banks are trying to sell billions of euros worth of property left by bankrupt developers. This is attracting bargain-hunting investors from abroad.
Andrea Comas Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 6:34 pm

Back in the day, Madrid's Palace Hotel was Ernest Hemingway's old haunt, or at least the bar was. Now, rooms at the posh hotel just down from the famed Prado Museum go for up to $6,000 a night. And gathering in its lobby these days? An altogether different type of foreigner: the kind in expensive suits.

"Probably they are institutional investors, hedge funds, sovereign wealth funds," says Federico Steinberg, an economist at Madrid's Elcano Institute.

There's a lot of cash around the world, he says, and a lot of people looking for bargains.

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The Salt
2:58 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Cranberry Juice For Urinary Tract Infections? It Really Can Help

Cranberry Antioxidant Punch
Maggie Starbard NPR

Native Americans and Pilgrims were onto something when they turned to cranberries as an infection fighter. American settlers believed the bitter food could stave off scurvy. But there's more than just Vitamin C in this indigenous berry.

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Middle East
2:57 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Syrian Rebels Carve Buffer Zone Near Turkish Border

More than 35,000 Syrians have sought shelter in Turkey. Most of the refugees at the Kilis refugee camp in southern Turkey are women and children.
Adem Altan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 6:34 pm

At this isolated part of the Turkish border, there's just one Turkish guard, a fence and, beyond an olive grove, Syria.

The Syrian side is just a short walk, perhaps 10 minutes. The area looks completely calm and there is no sign of the Syrian military.

Abu Amar, a rebel who has fought in Syria for five weeks, walked across this field from the Syrian village of Atma, which is now serving as a rebel headquarters. He says much of the northwestern province of Idlib is now controlled by the rebels, and it has become easy to move back and forth between Syria and Turkey here.

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Poverty In America
2:52 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Poverty In The U.S. By The Numbers

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 1:54 pm


Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Law
2:43 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Justice Delayed: After Three Decades, An Apology

Kirk Odom and his wife, Harriet, outside the H. Carl Moultrie Courthouse in Washington, D.C. On Tuesday, the Justice Department said there was "clear and convincing evidence" that Odom is innocent of a 1981 rape and robbery, for which he spent more than two decades behind bars.
Carrie Johnson NPR

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 6:34 pm

Nearly 31 years after he was convicted of rape and armed robbery, Kirk Odom on Tuesday all but won his fight to be declared an innocent man.

The Justice Department filed court papers saying, "There is clear and convincing evidence that Mr. Odom is innocent of the charges for which he was convicted," and apologized for the "terrible injustice."

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Poverty In America
2:42 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Cycle Of Poverty Hard To Break In Poorest U.S. City

Devora Trapp, 24, picks up her 8-month-old son, Dardarius Taylor, late one evening at the Opportunity House's Second Street Learning Center, a 24-hour day care center for low-income families in Reading, Pa.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 10:31 pm

In the middle of the night, most children are home in bed. But at the Second Street Learning Center in Reading, Pa., a half-dozen tiny bodies are curled up on green plastic floor mats, fast asleep.

Conversations are hushed. The lights are dim. At 1:30 a.m., day care worker Virginia Allen gently shakes two little sisters, snuggled under the same blanket, to tell them that their mother is there to pick them up.

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The Two-Way
2:38 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

The Heat, The Fires, The Flooding: Is Climate Change To Blame?

People enjoy the view from a lifeguard structure as the sun sets at Seal Beach, south of Los Angeles, California on Monday. Much of the U.S. has been gripped by a relentless heatwave, sparking health warnings and sending people to makeshift cooling shelters.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 4:12 pm

Every time there's been a bout of severe weather, like the heat wave in the northeast, the wild fires in the west and flooding across the U.K, the talk, naturally, turns to climate change.

The big question: How much does global warming have to do with severe weather?

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NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
2:12 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

A Twitter Conversation: #NPRCities Roundtable

Peter Booth and Alexandra Booth iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 6:34 pm

What do you think makes a better city? Do you like a mix of old and new on the same block?

Several urban thinkers joined us for a discussion on Twitter, including Bruce Katz of the Brookings Institution, Carol Coletta of ArtPlace America, writer and blogger Aaron Renn, The Atlantic Cities editor Sommer Mathis and Diana Lind of Next American City.

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Around the Nation
2:10 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Intense Heat Has Lasting Impact Across U.S.

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Heat in the summertime is usually not news, but this year is more than a little out of the ordinary. The first six months of 2012 is already on the books as the warmest half-year on record according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:01 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

When Does An App Need FDA's Blessing?

Pedometer, an app, keeps track of your steps, distance traveled and calories burned.
Benjamin Morris NPR

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 6:34 pm

Bernard Farrell obsesses over every bite he eats, every minute of exercise he gets, and everything that stresses him out. And, more than anything else, Farrell obsesses over his blood sugar.

He has to. Farrell, 55, has Type 1 diabetes.

"Pretty much everything affects our blood sugar," says Farrell, of Littleton, Mass.

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The Two-Way
1:52 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Vigilantes Are Targeting Immigrants In Greece, Human Rights Watch Says

A "wave of xenophobic violence" is rising in Greece, where vigilante gangs are targeting immigrants for beatings, Human Rights Watch reported today.

According to the international watchdog group:

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NPR Story
1:31 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Bad Book Review Sparks Fictional Friendship

Patrick Somerville set up a real email address for his character, Ben, who he describes as "kind of a wayfaring pothead version of Will Shortz."
Liv Friis-larsen iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 9:38 am

On July 2, The New York Times ran a review of author Patrick Somerville's book This Bright River. It was not a flattering assessment. Film and literary critic Janet Maslin described the starting point as "generic" and the destination as "soggy."

When Somerville read the review, he realized the whole thing hinged on a factual error: Maslin mixed up two characters from the very beginning, confusing which one got hit in the head.

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The Salt
1:07 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

The Importance Of Making Sushi And Mozzarella On Mars

Rupert Spies, Senior Lecturer in Food and Beverage Management at Cornell, gives a hands-on workshop on bread making with the NASA team.
Jason Koski courtesy of Cornell University Photography

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 1:31 pm

You might be surprised at how powdered milk, dehydrated kelp and shelf-stable chorizo can come together in ways that taste good — especially if you've been cooped up for a few months on a mission with five strangers on a desolate lava crater in Hawaii.

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Economy
1:07 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Downward Mobility A Modern Economic Reality

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 1:54 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Last week's disappointing jobs numbers offer little hope of change anytime soon for the millions of long-term unemployed and underemployed Americans. For too many, this crisis has extended so long that cherished plans have been set aside and sights lowered: owning a home maybe, a college fund for the kids, family vacations.

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Middle East
1:07 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Fighting In Syria Takes Harsh Human Toll

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 1:57 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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From Our Listeners
1:07 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Letters: Health Care Law And Extreme Anxiety

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 1:59 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

It's Tuesday, and time to read from your comments.

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The Two-Way
12:39 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Is Kim Jong Un's Mystery Woman The 'Excellent Horse-Like Lady?'

In this photo released by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) and distributed in Tokyo by the Korea News Service on Monday, July 9, 2012, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, right, and a woman clap with others on Friday as they watch a performance by North Korea's new Moranbong band in Pyongyang. Observers think she is Hyon Song-wol.
AP

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 10:31 am

It seems that North Korea's young leader may have reconnected with an old love.

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The Two-Way
12:27 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

3 Former Armstrong Associates Receive Lifetime Bans For Doping Violations

Lance Armstrong, rear left in yellow jersey, rides in the pack flanked by his US Postal Service teammates during the 18th stage of the Tour de France in 2004.
Christophe Ena AP

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 12:48 pm

Two doctors and a trainer affiliated with seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong have received lifetime bans from the sport because they failed to contest allegations that they violated doping bans.

The former members of the U.S. Postal Service Pro-Cycling Team — Dr. Luis Garcia del Moral, cycling team doctor, Dr. Michele Ferrari, cycling team consulting doctor, and Jose "Pepe" Martí, cycling team trainer — were charged by the United States Anti-Doping Agency at the same time they announced charges against Armstrong.

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Shots - Health Blog
12:05 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

CDC Now Has Tips For Surviving A Wedding

"Bridezilla" or tornado?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 2:31 pm

If you're planning a wedding, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has some advice for you. Really.

Leave it to the public health gurus to turn a day that's supposed to be one of the happiest in people's lives into a lesson in preparing for a real-life nightmare.

Just check out the "CDC's Wedding Day Survival Guide," featuring tips like this:

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The Two-Way
11:46 am
Tue July 10, 2012

School Is 'Too Easy' Say American Students

Many American students say school is too easy.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 12:28 pm

Many students in American classrooms don't feel challenged enough. That's according to new analysis of federal data (pdf) conducted by the Washington think tank American Progress.

The organization, which promotes "progressive ideas and action," came to that conclusion when it analyzed surveys given to students by the Department of Education for its National Assessment of Educational Progress.

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Health Care
11:42 am
Tue July 10, 2012

Miss. Rep: Abortion Clinic Regulation Protects Women

Transcript

MARIA HINOJOSA, HOST:

I'm Maria Hinojosa, and this is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, we look at a growing trend: moms starting their own businesses. It can come with more flexibility, but there are also emotional and financial risks. We talk to a group of mom-preneurs, and that's just ahead.

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Health Care
11:42 am
Tue July 10, 2012

'Unconstitutional' Miss. Abortion Law Has To Go

Transcript

MARIA HINOJOSA, HOST:

We turn now to Nancy Northup. She's the president and CEO of the Center for Reproductive Rights, which is representing the Jackson Women's Health Organization in court. This is the only abortion clinic in Mississippi, and it might have to close its doors if a new law there is upheld. If it closes, Mississippi would be the only state with no working abortion clinic. She joins me from her office in New York City. Nancy, welcome to TELL ME MORE.

NANCY NORTHUP: Thank you.

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Around the Nation
11:42 am
Tue July 10, 2012

Chicago Killings Spark Outrage

Transcript

MARIA HINOJOSA, HOST:

We turn now to another story that's making headlines for all the wrong reasons. It's been a bloody year in the Windy City. More than 250 people have reportedly been murdered so far this year in Chicago. That number is up about 38 percent from the same time last year, and now people are asking just what Mayor Rahm Emanuel is doing about it.

He faced reporters yesterday and said some of the old plans to stop violence weren't working now.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

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Music Reviews
11:08 am
Tue July 10, 2012

'St. Matthew Passion': A Monumental Bach Feast

Johann Sebastian Bach wrote the St. Matthew Passion in 1727 for solo voices, double choir and double orchestra.
Getty Digital

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 11:25 am

Facing Bach's St. Matthew Passion, I often feel a combination of anticipation and dread. It's a great work, profound in its humanity and spirituality, with sublimely beautiful music. But it's a long haul, and if it's not a good performance, well, I'm stuck. And it can be not-good in various ways: either too solemnly pious or too much an exercise in musical style rather than emotional drama. A new DVD recorded in 2010 at Berlin's great concert hall, the Philharmonie, would be of major interest under any circumstances.

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Afghanistan
10:51 am
Tue July 10, 2012

After Troops Leave, What Happens To Afghanistan?

Afghan army soldiers, like the one pictured here, will be responsible for protecting Kabul and holding critical cities and roads together after the planned 2014 American troop withdrawal.
Anja Niedringhaus AP

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 1:29 pm

This past weekend brought news of more violence in Afghanistan.

Seven Western troops, five Afghan police officers and at least 18 civilians were killed in Afghanistan. The toll included six Americans killed by a single bomb in Wardak province, south of Kabul.

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The Two-Way
10:09 am
Tue July 10, 2012

Even As Jobless Rate Stays High, Job Openings Continue To Grow

Applicants wait to enter a job fair in New York City last month.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 10:59 am

There were 3.6 million jobs open and ready to be filled in May if the right candidates came along, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported this morning.

That was up from 3.4 million in April, was the second-most for any month so far this year and was up 16 percent from the 3.1 million in May 2011.

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The Two-Way
9:07 am
Tue July 10, 2012

Listen: You Can Hear The Northern Lights, Researchers Say

The northern lights over Tromsoe, northern Norway, on Jan. 24, 2012.
Rune Stoltz Bertinussen AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 10:21 am

It sounds to us like someone's banging on a pipe. Others think it's like a clap.

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