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Education
4:10 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Chicago Teachers Union Delegates Vote On Contract

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:09 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The teachers Union in Chicago votes later today for the second time on whether to and a strike that has kept 350,000 students and their parents in limbo. On Sunday, the union's House of Delegates voted to continue the weeklong strike until they have more time to read the outline on of a tentative agreement. That vote was a setback for union President Karen Lewis and her bargaining team.

NPR's Claudio Sanchez reports that with the vote pending, some teachers still don't know what's in that agreement.

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Presidential Race
4:07 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Romney Conflated Different Groups With '47 Percent'

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:09 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney admits he could've used more elegant language, but he's not backing down. Romney was secretly recorded speaking at a fundraiser in May and his comments were publicized yesterday by the liberal magazine, "Mother Jones." Here he is telling wealthy backers that President Obama has a built-in base of support.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO)

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It's All Politics
4:02 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

'Mother Jones' Journalist: Video Not An Attempt To 'Catch Mitt Romney'

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 8:43 am

The Mother Jones journalist behind the release of a surreptitiously shot fundraising video says the source "did not go there looking to catch Mitt Romney in the act."

David Corn, the magazine's Washington bureau chief, tells NPR's Michel Martin on Tell Me More:

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NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
4:00 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

With Hats And Umbrellas, Senegalese Fill A City Niche

Senegalese vendor Cheikh Fall prepares his stall in front of Brooks Brothers on 51st Street, just off the Avenue of the Americas in New York City. Fall runs an association of Senegalese vendors that deals with the city over licensing and regulations.
Art Silverman NPR

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:09 pm

Careful planning can transform the shape and life of a city. But sometimes, a city's features develop spontaneously — like the immigrant enclaves that grow around certain jobs and trades in urban centers like New York.

Occupational cliches have been a fact of life in the Big Apple for generations. Historically, New Yorkers thought of Jewish tailors, Italian greengrocers or Irish policemen, says Philip Kasinitz, a sociologist with the City University of New York.

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The Two-Way
3:42 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

In Fox Interview, Romney Doubles Down On '47 Percent' Comments

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 4:31 pm

"This is a message I'm carrying day in and day out and will carry over the coming months."

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The Two-Way
2:57 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

What Did Jimmy Carter's Grandson Have To Do With The Romney Video?

There is a partisan side to the video that is giving Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney headaches. The man who found the video online and then negotiated its full release was James Carter IV, President Jimmy Carter's grandson.

If you haven't heard by now, the video was released by Mother Jones and it shows Romney talking bluntly about 47 percent of the country, whom he says pay no taxes and think themselves "victims."

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Theater
2:33 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Shorts Inspire Music In 'Sounding Beckett' Trilogy

In Ohio Impromptu, one of three short plays featured in Sounding Beckett, the silent character (Philip Goodwin, left, with Ted van Griethuysen) inspired music based on knocks and repetitions.
Jeremy Tressler Sounding Beckett

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:09 pm

It all began last year, when the Library of Congress presented Samuel Beckett's Ohio Impromptu alongside a piece of music by composer Dina Koston, which responded to the text. A New York group, the Cygnus Ensemble, played the music, while Washington, D.C., director Joy Zinoman staged the play, for one night only.

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The Salt
2:31 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Dr Pepper's Evolution Ad Strikes A Nerve With Some Christians

Dr Pepper's Facebook ad is the latest riff on a 1965 evolutionary graphic, which apparently still has the power to provoke.
Dr Pepper/Facebook

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 6:22 am

I'm a Pepper, You're a Pepper, but clearly, some people are not Peppers.

Dr Pepper's new Facebook ad campaign featuring an ape moving from all-fours, to seeing a soda on a rock, to an upright man, enjoying a Pepper, is apparently red meat to some creationists who are loudly expressing outrage at the idea that humans evolved from soda-discovering apes.

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It's All Politics
2:24 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Romney's '47 Percent' Comments Complicate Swing-State Fortunes

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney speaks to reporters Monday in Costa Mesa, Calif.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 3:42 pm

The question of whether Mitt Romney's presidential campaign will be hurt by his characterization of 47 percent of Americans as people who believe they are victims, entitled to health care, food, housing, "you name it," is fairly settled.

Yes, it will — at least in the short run. Romney's problem? There's not much more campaign left than a short run.

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Music Reviews
1:58 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Two Attempts To Turn Summer Platinum Into Fall Gold

Carly Rae Jepsen and the cover of Kanye West's latest album, Cruel Summer.
Vanessa Heins Courtesy of Universal Music Group

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 8:47 am

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Middle East
1:52 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Journalist Examines Chaotic Fighting In Syria

Ghaith Abdul-Ahad is a correspondent for The Guardian reporting for PBS Frontline.
Martin Argles/The Guardian AP

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:23 pm

The battle in Syria is being fought by rebel fighters who lack many of the basics typically associated with warfare: helmets, a large supply of ammo, and military planning.

"I was with one fighter who had 11 bullets, and he was, like, roaming as a freelance fighter along the front line trying to pick up a fight somewhere," journalist Ghaith Abdul-Ahad tells Fresh Air contributor Dave Davies.

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The Two-Way
1:48 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

'Mother Jones' Releases Full, Unedited Romney Video

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 2:57 pm

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From Our Listeners
1:25 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Letters: Housing Market And Pervasive Poverty

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

It's Tuesday and time to read from your comments.

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Health Care
1:24 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Hospitals Fight To Stop Superbugs' Spread

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 3:11 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. The NIH superbug claimed its seventh victim last week, more than six months after specialists at one of the country's most prestigious hospitals thought they had the outbreak contained. The bug is called Klebsiella - I'll get it right - Klebsiella pneumoniae, or KPC for short, and most antibiotics can't kill it. It's one of several drug-resistant bacteria that many hospitals struggle to control. The best known is probably MRSA.

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Business
1:16 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Can Anyone Compete With Apple?

Demand for Apple's iPhone 5 is expected to be so big that one economist predicted sales could boost the U.S. economy 1/2 percent. And Apple's going to court to shut down what it sees as copycats. Slate columnist Farhad Manjoo talks about who's competing with Apple, and whether it's working.

Law
1:13 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

The Pros And Cons Of Gathering Biometric Data

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Anybody who watches police procedurals on TV knows the term AFIS. That stands for the FBI's Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System. And over the next couple of years, it's being updated, and we're going to have to get used to a new acronym, NGIS, the Next-Generation Identification System, which incorporates an improved fingerprint system and all kinds of other biometric data, from face recognition to iris scans.

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Politics
1:04 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Full Romney Video Puts Comments In Context

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 3:14 pm

Mother Jones released the full video of Mitt Romney at a Florida fundraising event in May that included the clips they made public of Mitt Romney commenting on the "47 percent." NPR senior Washington editor Ron Elving talks about the tape and how it could affect the presidential campaign.

Shots - Health Blog
12:55 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Botswana Doctors Stop Cervical Cancer With A Vinegar Swab

Doreen Ramogola-Masire, an obstetrician-gynecologist in Botswana, hopes that a simple, quick screen for cervical cancer with vinegar will catch the disease early and save women's lives.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 12:56 pm

In the U.S., the pap smear has become a routine part of women's health care, and it's dramatically reduced cervical cancer deaths. But in Africa and other impoverished regions, few women get pap smears because the countries lack the laboratories and other resources necessary to offer them.

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The Two-Way
12:06 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Egypt Issues Arrest Warrant For Americans Behind Muhammad Film

Los Angles County Sheriff's officers escort an unidentified person out of Nakoula Basseley Nakoula's home in Cerritos, Calif., early Saturday.
Bret Hartman Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 1:26 pm

Egypt's general prosecutor has issued an arrest warrant for eight Americans in relation to the anti-Muslim film that has sparked worldwide protests.

While it's not entirely clear who made the The Innocence of Muslims, a Coptic Christian from California named Nakoula Basseley Nakoula has admitted having a role in the film's making.

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Music Reviews
12:00 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Brad Mehldau: (Unlikely) Songs By Other People

Brad Mehldau's latest covers project, Where Do You Start, came out Tuesday.
Michael Wilson Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:23 pm

At this point, there's nothing special about jazz musicians playing post-Beatles pop: It's just the new normal. But one of the trendsetters on that score was pianist Brad Mehldau and his versions of Radiohead and Nick Drake tunes. Now, Mehldau's trio has a new covers album out.

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Asia
11:42 am
Tue September 18, 2012

With Honors Awaiting, Aung San Suu Kyi Visits U.S.

Myanmar's Member of Parliament and democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi speaks at the United States Institute of Peace in Washington, DC. The Nobel Peace Prize laureate is making her first visit to the U.S. in twenty years.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 1:00 pm

It's been a long time since Aung San Suu Kyi visited the U.S., but it's a homecoming nonetheless — and this time with star treatment.

Suu Kyi, the opposition leader from Myanmar, also known as Burma, lived in New York from 1969-1971, while working for the United Nations, and her eldest son, Alexander Aris, studied and settled in the U.S.

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The Salt
11:38 am
Tue September 18, 2012

Fruit And Veggies Linked To Lower Obesity Rates In New State Fat Rankings

Customers line up for farmers market produce on a corner in Washington, D.C., where people eat more fruits and veggies than in many states.
Dan Charles/NPR

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 3:32 pm

Every year, we dutifully report on the annual Trust for America's Health and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation state obesity rankings, and every year, it's a similar story — a handful of southern states, on the whole, are the biggest. (It's Mississippi, Louisiana, and West Virginia in 2011, in case you were wondering.)

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The Two-Way
11:21 am
Tue September 18, 2012

After Seven Days, Chicago Teachers Vote To Suspend Strike

Teacher Patty Westcott pickets outside Clissold Elementary School in Chicago on Tuesday.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 6:43 am

Update at 6:15 p.m. ET. Strike Suspended:

Chicago teachers voted to suspend a strike that had gone into its seventh day today.

The Chicago Sun-Times reports that means that 350,000 students in the nation's third-largest school district will return to classrooms this week.

The AP reports:

"The union's House of Delegates voted Tuesday to suspend the strike after learning details of a tentative contract agreement.

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It's All Politics
11:19 am
Tue September 18, 2012

Obama Backers More Nuanced Than '47 Percent' — And So Are Romney's

President Obama after speaking Monday in Columbus, Ohio.
Tony Dejak AP

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 12:26 pm

Mitt Romney has gotten into political hot water for asserting that "47 percent of the people" favor President Obama because they are "dependent upon government."

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The Two-Way
11:13 am
Tue September 18, 2012

Our Mistake: We Missed The Ball On Reporting Baseball's 500,000th Error

Jose Reyes of the Miami Marlins.
Jason Arnold Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 11:53 am

This blogger makes mistakes, as sharp-eyed Two-Way readers who can spell and punctuate know all too well.

So errors are something familiar.

Which brings up this milestone: Miami Marlins shortstop Jose Reyes on Saturday committed what is thought to have been the 500,000th error in Major League history (since 1876, that is).

But did he?

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Sports
11:03 am
Tue September 18, 2012

US Medalist Makes No Apologies For Mexican Flag

Leo Manzano became the first American since 1968 to win an Olympic medal in the men's 1500 meter run in the London Games this summer. But he got a lot of criticism for carrying both Mexican and American flags during his victory lap. For Hispanic Heritage Month, Manzano speaks with host Michel Martin.

Politics
10:51 am
Tue September 18, 2012

Romney 'Secret Video,' Curveball Or Game Changer?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And we are going to continue our conversation about this, with two respected analysts whom we turn to, from time to time. I spoke with them earlier. Mary Kate Cary is a former speechwriter for President George H.W. Bush. She's now a blogger and columnist for "U.S. News & World Report." Maria Teresa Kumar is the president and CEO of Voto Latino. That's a nonpartisan group that encourages Latinos to get involved in the political process. Previously, she was an aide to the House Democratic Caucus.

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Politics
10:51 am
Tue September 18, 2012

Should Romney Double Down On Video Comments?

Originally published on Fri September 21, 2012 10:32 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, Leo Manzano came home from the London Olympics with a silver medal. It was a proud moment for his family and for the country, but how he displayed that pride landed him in a little hot water. We're going to talk to the runner about that and how he made history in London. That conversation is in just a few minutes.

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Politics
10:51 am
Tue September 18, 2012

David Corn: Romney Shows Disdain For 'Moochers'

Originally published on Fri September 21, 2012 10:31 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We're going to start the program today talking about that secret recording of Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney making what he, himself, has now called inelegant remarks to a group of wealthy donors about Obama voters, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and his connection to Mexico.

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Shots - Health Blog
10:50 am
Tue September 18, 2012

Nursing Homes' Arbitration Agreements Can Contain Hidden Risks

The agreements offered by many nursing homes can result in higher fees and smaller awards in the case of a dispute.
iStockphoto.com

If you find yourself with the unenviable task of checking Mom or Dad into a nursing home one day, or if you're signing yourself in, chances are you'll find a document tucked inside the stack of admissions papers that says you agree to arbitrate disputes, should they arise, rather than take the case to court.

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