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Election 2012
6:37 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

Polls Closed In Virginia, But Race Too Close To Call

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 7:08 pm

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Lynn Neary. And the results are starting to come in. At this hour, polls in six states have closed. That includes the all-important swing state of Virginia. It's the only state in the bunch that is too close to call. In South Carolina, Georgia, Kentucky and Indiana, NPR projects that Mitt Romney will win. And in Vermont, the NPR projection is a win for President Obama. No surprises there.

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Election 2012
6:17 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

Polls Start To Close In Big Battleground States

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 7:08 pm

Lynn Neary talks to Mara Liasson for an election update as polls start to close.

It's All Politics
4:59 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

Battleground States Carry Obama To Second Term

President Obama walks on stage with first lady Michelle Obama and daughters Sasha and Malia to deliver his victory speech on election night in Chicago.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 7, 2012 5:58 am

Americans elected Barack Obama to a second term Tuesday, with the president capturing or on the verge of winning all of the key states that had been at the center of his hard-fought campaign against Republican Mitt Romney.

"Whether I earned your vote or not, I have listened to you," Obama said early Wednesday at a speech before thousands of supporters in Chicago. "I have learned from you. And you've made me a better president.

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It's All Politics
4:54 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

Republicans Keep The House; Democrats To Retain Senate

Democrat Elizabeth Warren takes the stage after defeating incumbent GOP Sen. Scott Brown in the Massachusetts Senate race on Tuesday.
Michael Dwyer AP

Originally published on Wed November 7, 2012 5:45 am

Republicans have easily maintained their hold on the House, while missteps from Tea Party favorites helped Democrats retain a majority in the Senate.

That means the two chambers of Congress remain deeply divided, with prospects for agreement on such big-ticket items as deficits, tax rates and climate change unclear.

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Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond
4:08 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

Protection From The Sea Is Possible, But Expensive

Residents of the Colonial Place neighborhood watch as heavy rain from Hurricane Sandy floods the Lafayette River in Norfolk, Va., on Oct. 28.
Rich-Joseph Facun Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed November 7, 2012 8:14 am

While New York City and other places along the Northeast coast are still recovering from Superstorm Sandy, they're also looking ahead to how they can prevent flooding in the future, when sea level rise will make the problem worse. They may be able to take some lessons from coastal Norfolk, Va., which is far ahead of most cities when it comes to flood protection.

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NPR Story
3:57 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

Obama, Romney Make Final Campaign Calls

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 7:08 pm

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Lynn Neary. It is almost over. After more than $2 billion and about a thousand campaign events, we will soon know the results.

MITT ROMNEY: This is a big day for big change. We're about to change America to help people in ways they didn't imagine they could be helped, with good jobs and better take-home pay.

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Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond
3:51 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

Jersey Shore Storm Survivors Face Uncertain Future

Jennifer Ruiz and her 2-year-old daughter, "Moo Moo," at a Red Cross shelter in Little Egg Harbor Township, N.J. Ruiz and her daughter evacuated from their home in Seaside Heights.
Alix Spiegel NPR

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 7:37 pm

The barrier islands off the coast of New Jersey were hit hard by Superstorm Sandy, and for the moment, most residents are banned from living in their homes because the area is far too damaged.

Which is why this past weekend, in a Red Cross shelter at Pinelands High School in Egg Harbor, N.J., on the mainland, around 100 stranded island residents were lining up for dinner, while Red Cross volunteers worked hard to keep things reassuring.

"Excuse me everybody!" shouted one of the volunteers, waving her arms above her head. "Is there a Jan and a Manny in the house?"

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The Two-Way
3:26 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

We'll Be Live Blogging Tonight

Voting in Los Angeles today.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 11:42 pm

Here's the plan for our Election Night coverage:

-- Starting between 5 p.m. and 6 p.m., we'll be live-blogging. Not here in The Two-Way, but right on the homefront of NPR.org and on our "Election Night 2012" results page. If all goes as planned, our updates should flow on to your screen automatically.

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Planet Money
3:16 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

A Hidden Safety Net, Made Visible By The Storm

Shopping carts full of food damaged by Sandy await disposal at Fairway.
Seth Wenig AP

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 3:54 pm

The Fairway supermarket in Red Hook, Brooklyn is the sort of place New Yorkers, accustomed to cramped spaces, talk about with amazement. It's an actual, full-size supermarket, right at the edge of New York Harbor.

It's a beautiful setting, but one that was diastrous last week, when Sandy came through.

"There were five feet of water throughout the store," Bill Sanford, the president of the company told me. "Everything was submerged."

They had to throw out dumpsters worth of food. Chicken, fish, vegetables.

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The Two-Way
3:12 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

After Driving On Sidewalk To Pass School Bus, Woman Must Wear 'Idiot' Sign

Caught in the act. Shena Hardin decided she wouldn't stop just because a school bus was pulled over. She went up on the sidewalk instead.
Fox8 Cleveland

"Justice has been served!" declares the man who helped police in Cleveland nab a woman who had been driving up on a sidewalk many mornings to get around a stopped school bus with children on board.

It's something 32-year-old Shena Hardin had done many times before, apparently, and for which a judge has now ordered her to wear a sign reading "Only an idiot would drive on the sidewalk to avoid the school bus."

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Deceptive Cadence
2:50 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

Elliott Carter, Giant Of American Music, Dies At 103

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 7:08 pm

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NPR Story
2:26 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

Guam's Straw Poll Picks Obama, Overwhelmingly

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

It's already tomorrow, Wednesday morning, in the American territory of Guam, 15 hours ahead of East Coast time. Residents there don't get to vote for president, but they do hold a straw poll on Election Day. Those results are just in. Since 1984, Guam's straw poll has correctly predicted the winner of the U.S. presidential election.

Jayne Flores is a contributing reporter to KPRG, our member station in Guam, and she joins us now from her home in Mangilao.

And did I pronounce that correctly, or anywhere close to correctly?

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It's All Politics
2:22 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

In Guam, 'Non-Binding Straw Poll' Gives Obama A Commanding Win

The polls in Guam have closed and the results are in.

President Obama managed a big victory, garnering 72 percent of the votes. That's about 23,067 votes compared to 8,443 votes for Gov. Mitt Romney.

Now for the disclaimers: Guam, 6,000 miles and 18 times zones away from California, is a territory of the United States, so their votes don't count. The presidential part of the vote is considered a "non-binding straw poll." But if you believe in bellweathers, listen up.

Here's what R. Todd Thompson of NPR member station KPRG in Guam told us:

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The Salt
2:20 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

Restaurant Meals Mean More Calories And Soda For Kids And Teens

When they eat out at a restaurant, kids consume more calories than they do at home. Here, members of the Long Island Gulls hockey team enjoy a lunch at TGI Friday's back in 2007 in Marlborough, Mass.
Bruce Bennett Getty Images

Walk into a fast food restaurant and it's probably safe to assume that whatever deep-fried deliciousness you eat, you'll consume more calories than you would if you ate a well-rounded home cooked meal. That's common sense.

But, public health officials are sounding the alarm about the effect that eating out often – whether at fast food or full service restaurants – is having on our diets, especially in children.

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The Two-Way
1:35 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

Russia's Putin Sacks Defense Minister Amid Corruption Scandal

A Russian Army officer walks past Defence Ministry offices in Moscow, on Tuesday. Putin fired defence minister Anatoly Serdyukov over a corruption scandal, the most dramatic change to the government since he returned to the Kremlin for a third term.
Andrey Smirnov AFP/Getty Images

Russian President Vladimir Putin today fired his defense minister, who is embroiled in a real estate corruption scandal.

The New York Times reports:

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Movies
1:17 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

Cast Your Ballot For Your Favorite Election Movies

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 2:26 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Passionate preparations, raucous rallies, debatable decisions, last-second scandals and the awful, awful suspense, Hollywood celebrates Election Day dramatics, even when the vote's in high school.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "ELECTION")

REESE WITHERSPOON: (as Tracy Flick) Dear Lord Jesus, I do not often speak with you and ask for things. But now, I really must insist that you help me win the election tomorrow, because I deserve it and Paul Metzler doesn't, as you well know.

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Africa
1:16 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

All Aboard South Africa's High-Speed Train

Passengers wait to board the Gautrain, Africa's first high-speed train, in Johannesburg, South Africa, Aug. 2, 2011. The train travels at speeds of up to 100 mph and makes commuting much easier for South Africans accustomed to congested roads and traffic jams.
Li Qihua Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 7:37 pm

Public transit in South Africa can be a bit of a nightmare. Many South Africans have had to depend on the ubiquitous taxivans, which are often overcrowded, dirty and driven recklessly.

But the continent's first rapid rail service, built to ease traffic congestion in South Africa's economic heart, is changing that.

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History
1:10 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

History's Best Victory And Concession Speeches

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 2:25 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

While voters head to the polls, the candidates repair to hotel rooms and a select group of campaign staff prepares one final set of remarks. Well, two sets, actually. One for victory, one for defeat. You probably remember the remarkable scene four years ago when then President-elect Barack Obama addressed a rapturous crowd of more than 200,000 in Chicago's Grant Park.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED AUDIO)

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Election 2012
1:06 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

If You Voted Election Day, Tell Us What You Saw

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 2:25 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. The candidates repeatedly tell us that now it's finally up to the voters, which is true as far as that goes. But it's also up to the campaign volunteers who ferry supporters to the polls, to squadrons of poll-watchers who keep an eye out for shenanigans and to the legions of lawyers who will draft appeals and protests and orders to show cause.

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Author Interviews
12:25 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

Oliver Sacks, Exploring How Hallucinations Happen

Oliver Sacks is a physician, author and professor of neurology at NYU School of Medicine. He also frequently contributes to The New Yorker.
Elena Seibert Knopf

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 11:58 am

In Oliver Sacks' book The Mind's Eye, the neurologist included an interesting footnote in a chapter about losing vision in one eye because of cancer that said: "In the '60s, during a period of experimenting with large doses of amphetamines, I experienced a different sort of vivid mental imagery."

He expands on this footnote in his new book, Hallucinations, where he writes about various types of hallucinations — visions triggered by grief, brain injury, migraines, medications and neurological disorders.

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Shots - Health News
12:23 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

Drug-Resistant Malaria On The Rise In Southeast Asia

Daw Khin Twon, an undocumented immigrant from Burma, rests at home after receiving malaria treatment at the Mae Tao Clinic in Mae Sot, Thailand.
Ben de la Cruz NPR

For malaria in Southeast Asia, there's good news and bad news right now. Overall, the number of cases is down, but there's a growing problem of drug resistance in the cases that do crop up.

Researchers worry that superstrains of the parasite — strains immune to the most common medications — could wipe out the recent progress against malaria.

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The Salt
11:41 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Ready-To-Eat Meals Feed Thousands In Wake Of Superstorm Sandy

A young woman helps bag ready-to-eat meals for distribution to the residents of the Lower East Side who remain without power due to Superstorm Sandy on Friday.
John Minchillo AP

When we think of ready-to-eat meals, we usually think of those packets of nutrient-dense soldiers' rations, like the Army sandwich that stays fresh for two years. These pouches of food are typically deployed in the field, and are consequently designed to withstand the abuses of temperature and time that would destroy fresh fare.

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It's All Politics
11:30 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Voting Issues: Long Lines In Florida, Confusion In New Jersey

Voters line up to cast a ballot in Crawfordville, Fla.
Mark Wallheiser Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 3:18 pm

As the voting day has progressed, we've seen some reports of irregularities.. Throughout the day, we'll be surveying our reporters and other news organizations and keep track of significant irregularities in this post.

So far, the big problem has been long lines. Some voters have had to wait hours in line to cast their ballot in battleground states like Florida and Virginia and those affected by Superstorm Sandy like New York.

We'll start with Florida:

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Election 2012
11:18 am
Tue November 6, 2012

In Nev., Unpredictable Polling, Lots Of Independents

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 12:16 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Here we are on election morning, and in the swing state of Nevada, most of the work is already done. Most of the ballots were cast in early voting. Nevada political journalist Jon Ralston has been keeping close track of the tallies. He's on the line.

Welcome to the program, sir.

JON RALSTON: Hi, Steve.

INSKEEP: So, in recent days, what have you been seeing?

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Shots - Health News
10:50 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Why The Heart Doctor Might Give Your Hairline The Once-Over

This gentleman may want to have a chat with his cardiologist.
Bill Losh Getty Creative Images

Originally published on Thu December 6, 2012 4:15 pm

Whether you're fighting to hold onto your youth or wear your age proudly, visible signs of aging are pretty much inevitable. But if you're looking particularly ragged before your time, researchers say it could be a reason to check with a cardiologist.

A 35-year study involving 11,000 people in Denmark suggests that the presence of several telltale signs of aging, like baldness and receding hairline, may flag a person's risk for a heart attack or heart disease.

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Election 2012
10:19 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Will Hidden Issues Make The Agenda Next Term?

Host Michel Martin continues the conversation about the big issues missing on the campaign trail. Issues like crime, caregiving, poverty and climate change might affect millions of people, but they may not win a lot of votes. Martin speaks with a panel of journalists about whether these issues will enter the conversation over the next four years.

Your Money
10:19 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Angie's Tips On Avoiding Storm Scams

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 11:03 am

Severe weather could be headed for regions hard hit by superstorm Sandy, so many homeowners are scrambling to make repairs. The rush might make them vulnerable to so-called storm chasers — con artists posing as contractors. Host Michel Martin speaks with Angie Hicks, founder of the website Angie's List, for tips on how to avoid home repair scams.

Education
10:19 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Is The Nightly Homework Battle Worth It?

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 11:03 am

A lot of kids hate homework, and studies show they're getting more of it than ever. But experts are questioning whether the work is worth it. Host Michel Martin discusses the debate over homework with a panel of parents, including regular contributor Jolene Ivey, psychologist Kenneth Goldberg and educator Stephen Jones.

Election 2012
10:19 am
Tue November 6, 2012

What Issues Did The Candidates Miss?

Voters have been bombarded by political ads, but some topics have gotten very little attention this election season. Host Michel Martin speaks with a panel of journalists about some of this election's hidden issues. She speaks with NPR's Marilyn Geewax, Jennifer Ludden, and David Schaper, as well as The Washington Post's Melinda Henneberger.

The Two-Way
9:47 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Car Bomb Kills At Least 26 In Baghdad Attack

An explosive-filled car was detonated near an Army base in Baghdad today, just as would-be recruits gathered outside. The explosion killed at least 26 people, reports The New York Times. Reuters puts the death toll at 31.

Reuters reports that this is "one of the worst attacks this year on [Iraq's] military."

The wire service adds:

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