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Election 2012
3:30 am
Mon July 16, 2012

Romney Responds To Obama's Bain Capital Charges

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 6:04 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Until this past weekend, Romney generally ignored invitations to be interviewed, except on Fox News. Then on Friday night, he did a series of TV talks defending his work at Bain Capital.

NPR's media correspondent David Folkenflik was watching.

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Middle East
3:30 am
Mon July 16, 2012

Syrian Violence Escalates Into Civil War

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 6:40 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Across the border in Syrian, reports of clashes between the army and rebels overnight in a neighborhood in Damascus. It was some of the heaviest fighting so far in the capital, according to residents and activists who say the army for the first time bombarded one neighborhood with mortars.

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NPR Story
3:27 am
Mon July 16, 2012

Presidential Election: How Much Does Fundraising Matter?

Originally published on Tue July 17, 2012 9:18 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Mitt Romney and the Republican Party have lately been raising more money than President Obama and the Democrats. They won the money chase in May and in June. Normally, you would expect the incumbent to raise far more money.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And President Obama's campaign promptly warned supporters that he could lose without more cash. Though the Democrats have still raised more in the overall campaign, this led us to ask: How much does a fundraising advantage matter?

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NPR Story
3:27 am
Mon July 16, 2012

Mitsubishi, Suzuki, Mazda Struggle In U.S Market

Originally published on Wed July 18, 2012 3:40 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The recession came close to killing off some of the American automakers. Now in a slow recovery, the American companies are doing better. Japanese car companies, some of them, are struggling - in particular some of the smaller Japanese automakers are facing trouble. NPR's Sonari Glinton looks at the fortunes of what are known as the Little Three.

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NPR Story
3:27 am
Mon July 16, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 6:20 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with Microsoft's moves in the news business.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Business
2:29 am
Mon July 16, 2012

In Bankruptcy, American Airlines Looks At All Options

Will American emerge from bankruptcy as a stand-alone airline, or will it merge with US Airways? An American spokesman says it's considering all options.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Tue July 17, 2012 6:30 am

Imagine going into bankruptcy with billions of dollars in cash still in your bank account. That's what American Airlines did last November. The thinking was that management would gut the company's pensions and union contracts and emerge from bankruptcy ready to compete.

But then US Airways said it could take over American and be profitable, and it wouldn't have to hurt American's employees nearly as bad in the process. American's pilots, mechanics and flight attendants loved that idea.

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Business
2:26 am
Mon July 16, 2012

Bucking Bulls Draw Crowds, And Dollars

Bulls are judged with a "dummy" weight for four seconds to see how hard they will jump and twist to buck a rider. Bulls that do well can sell for up to $50,000.
Laura Ziegler KCUR

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 4:04 pm

The bucking bull has long been the embodiment of the American rodeo, and it takes just four seconds for a strong young bull to reap its owner as much as $50,000 in prize money.

Four seconds is how long each 1- or 2-year-old bull will wear a weight strapped to its back as the massive animal is judged on how high it kicks and how much it twists.

In the past 10 years, bucking bulls have become a major industry. The price of the best bloodlines can soar to $250,000, and competitions take place everywhere from Madison Square Garden to Wyoming.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:25 am
Mon July 16, 2012

Is HIV Still A Death Sentence? Young People Weigh In

Young activists distribute condoms at an AIDS awareness event in Ashbury Park, N.J.
Charles Sykes AP

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 7:11 am

Think of this like a snapshot — a few perspectives of HIV-negative 20-somethings.

To start, we posted the following query on NPR's Facebook page:

"Thirty years ago, a positive HIV status was considered a death sentence. As treatments for the disease have advanced over the past three decades, we're wondering how younger people view the disease today."

Hundreds of people e-mailed and commented with their reactions. We also gathered reactions from young folks we met on the street.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:24 am
Mon July 16, 2012

Treatment Gives HIV's Long-Term Survivors Hope, But Takes A Toll

HIV treatment regimens, like the pills in this patient's hand, keep AIDS at bay, but can take a harsh physical toll over the course of many years.
Amy Sancetta AP

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 11:43 am

Crystal Roberts-Lee has lived a tough life, and her HIV has, in some ways, been the least of her worries.

She was addicted to heroin and cocaine. Her daughter went to prison. A scorpion tattoo crawling across her neck marks the day her husband died from AIDS. Now, at 59, Roberts-Lee is the healthiest she has ever been.

"After I take my medicine, it's just a normal day for me," she says. "I go on with whatever I have to do. If I'm just out and about, I feel like I'm just like the next person."

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Shots - Health Blog
7:52 pm
Sun July 15, 2012

Thriving Gut Bacteria Linked To Good Health

Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables is important for gut health, especially in aging adults.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 17, 2012 9:19 am

There's no magic elixir for healthy aging, but here's one more thing to add to the list: good gut health.

A study published in the latest issue of Nature finds diet may be key to promoting diverse communities of beneficial bacteria in the guts of older people.

To evaluate this, researchers analyzed the microbiota, or gut bacteria, of 178 older folks, mostly in their 70s and 80s.

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Movie Interviews
4:44 pm
Sun July 15, 2012

'Dark Knight Rises,' But Saga Ends For Director Nolan

Christopher Nolan on the set of The Dark Knight Rises, drawing some Batman graffiti.
Ron Phillips Warner Bros. Pictures

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 7:05 pm

The new Batman film, The Dark Knight Rises, is perhaps the most anticipated movie of the summer. It's the last film in the Batman trilogy that writer-director Christopher Nolan has crafted over the past 7 years.

Nolan wanted The Dark Knight Rises, which will be released in theaters July 20, to feel like a historical epic. As he tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz, he looked to films like Fritz Lang's Metropolis, David Lean's Dr. Zhivago, and Ridley Scott's Blade Runner.

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News
4:18 pm
Sun July 15, 2012

Who Killed Jean McConville? A Battle For IRA Secrets

Sinn Fein President Gerry Adams, right, carries the coffin of senior IRA commander Brendan Hughes, in West Belfast, Northern Ireland.
Peter Morrison AP

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 10:15 pm

A legal showdown is evolving. It affects an American university, the British government, a brutal Irish paramilitary organization and the murdered mother of 10 children.

Journalist Ed Moloney is fighting to keep secret interviews with former paramilitary members of the Irish Republican Army out of the British government's hands. Those interviews are kept under lock and key at Boston College as part of an oral history project that Moloney started in 2001.

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Environment
4:18 pm
Sun July 15, 2012

From Coal To Gas: The Potential Risks And Rewards

Oil field workers drill into the Gypsum Hills near Medicine Lodge, Kan. Hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," to coax out oil and gas has led to a natural gas boom, but some remain concerned of the potential environmental impact.
Orlin Wagner AP

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 7:58 am

This past week, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released a report linking climate change to some of the extreme weather events of 2011, like the devastating drought in Texas and record high temperatures in Britain.

None of this bodes well for the future, but there is a glimmer of hope. It turns out that U.S. carbon emissions are down nearly 8 percent since 2006.

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The Record
3:07 pm
Sun July 15, 2012

Def Leppard's Joe Elliott On Covering Def Leppard

Joe Elliott fronting Def Leppard in London last year.
Jo Hale Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:30 pm

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Author Interviews
2:57 pm
Sun July 15, 2012

Chewing Chia Packs A Superfood Punch

The chia plant is "a petite nutrient-packed powerhouse" writes Wayne Coates. There is evidence that the Aztecs used the seeds as early as 3,500 B.C.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 5:10 pm

When you hear the word chia, you probably think of chia pets. Maybe you even mutter that catchy slogan: "ch-ch-ch-chia."

Or maybe not, but lately, chia seed has been getting buzz beyond those terra cotta figurines. It's becoming a popular health food. Rich in fiber, protein and the highest plant source of Omega 3s, the little seeds pack a major nutritional punch.

Wayne Coates grows and sells chia seeds and has a book called Chia: The Complete Guide to the Ultimate Superfood.

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Remembrances
12:47 pm
Sun July 15, 2012

'Oklahoma!' Actress Celeste Holm Dies At 95

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 5:10 pm

Academy Award-winning actress Celeste Holm has died. A star on both stage and screen, Holm was best known for roles in Gentleman's Agreement, All About Eve and Oklahoma! She was 95.

Holm died early Sunday morning in her Manhattan apartment with her husband, family and close friends by her side. She had been hospitalized a couple weeks ago following a fire in actor Robert De Niro's apartment in the same building.

If there was one role that put Holm on the map, it was as the coquettish Ado Annie, in the 1943 hit musical, Oklahoma!

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The Two-Way
11:29 am
Sun July 15, 2012

Red Cross Declares Civil War In Syria

UN observers inspect a bombed-out school in the Syrian village of Tremsah, where as many as 200 people may have been killed after an armed conflict erupted last week.
Pierre Torres AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 3:43 pm

The conflict in Syria has now reached the level of civil war, the Red Cross announced Sunday.

The declaration means international humanitarian law now applies throughout the country, and is the responsibility of all parties, whether rebel or government.

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The Two-Way
9:39 am
Sun July 15, 2012

Response To Disastrous Flood Ignites Russian Rage Online

An Emergency Ministry soldier helps to repair religious icons in a church hit by flood water in the town of Nizhnebakansky, about 750 miles south of Moscow, on Tuesday.
Sergey Ponomarev AP

Originally published on Wed July 18, 2012 11:54 am

Russians are slowly beginning to recover from the devastating flooding that soaked the southwestern region of Krasnodar. The floods, which struck in the early morning hours on July 7, reportedly killed more than 150 people.

It wasn't long before outrage flowed. Masha Lipman, a researcher with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Moscow, says the government had advance notice of the disaster, but didn't pass along the message.

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Sports
6:22 am
Sun July 15, 2012

Unusual Outliers In Baseball

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 10:11 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LIFE IS A BALL GAME")

SISTER WYNONA CARR: (Singing) Life...

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Yes, it is time for sports with NPR's Mike Pesca, but, you know, this week I wanted to hear another song. Let's hit it...

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WE ARE FAMILY")

SISTER SLEDGE: (Singing) We are family, I've got all my sisters with me. We are family. Get up everybody and sing.

GREENE: Mike, are you there?

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Yeah.

GREENE: Do you recognize this song?

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Middle East
6:22 am
Sun July 15, 2012

In Egypt, Clinton Promotes Dialogue With Military

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 8:41 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton heads for Israel today; this, after leaving Egypt, where she met with that country's new Islamist president and also, the head of the powerful military council. Secretary Clinton said Egypt needs to continue its transition to a civilian-led democracy. But that message was delivered gently, a sign that Washington sees a long and uncertain transition ahead. NPR's Peter Kenyon has more from Cairo.

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Asia
6:22 am
Sun July 15, 2012

Slowed Growth Reflects China's Uphill Battle

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 10:11 am

No country has enjoyed more spectacular growth in recent decades than China. But the economy that will one day replace America's as the world's largest also faces a lot of challenges. Guest host David Greene talks to NPR's Frank Langfitt, who was a reporter in China in the '90s and returned to Shanghai for NPR last year.

Politics
6:22 am
Sun July 15, 2012

A View From Inside The Governors' Meeting

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 10:11 am

Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear was one of the state leaders attending the Governors Association meeting this weekend. Host David Greene talks with the Democrat about the hot topics at this year's gathering in Williamsburg, Va.

Middle East
6:22 am
Sun July 15, 2012

U.N. Tries To Reconcile Accounts Of Killings In Syria

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 10:11 am

U.N. investigators visited the site of a mass killing in Syria. Their initial report cites a targeted attack on the village of Tremseh, but have been unable to confirm the death toll. The Syrian government says it was an anti-terrorist operation and no civilians were killed. Guest host David Greene talks to NPR's Deborah Amos.

Europe
6:22 am
Sun July 15, 2012

Babushkas Sing For The Good Of Their Village

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 10:11 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And let's travel to a different part of Russia now.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

BABUSHKAS OF BURANOVA: (Singing in Russian)

GREENE: These are the Babushkas of Buranova.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

BURANOVA: (Singing in Russian)

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Europe
6:22 am
Sun July 15, 2012

German Town Separates Parking Spots By Gender

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 10:11 am

A small town in southwest German has designated two parking spaces, "men only." They're two of the town's trickiest places to park. The mayor's response, guest host David Greene reports, is that it will attract tourists.

Europe
6:22 am
Sun July 15, 2012

Public Crisis Makes Athens A Tough Draw For Tourists

Graffiti coats a statue near the National Archaeological Museum in Athens. The street is often filled with drug users at night.
Joanna Kakissis NPR

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 10:21 am

The Greek capital of Athens has suffered from an image problem since the debt crisis began more than two years ago. Media reports often show masked gangs throwing petrol bombs at Parliament or riot police dousing demonstrators with tear gas.

Many tourists are staying away as a result. Tourist arrivals to the city are down by between 20 and 40 percent, industry representatives say.

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Health Care
5:10 am
Sun July 15, 2012

Eyes On Election, Governors Hedge On Health Care

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 10:11 am

As governors from around the country meet this weekend in Williamsburg, Va., health care is near the top of their agenda. Specifically, what to do about the federal health law, now that the Supreme Court has given states new options.

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Presidential Race
1:26 am
Sun July 15, 2012

Green Party Pick Gives Democrats Brunt Of Criticism

Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein delivers her acceptance speech at the party's convention in Baltimore on Saturday.
Laura-Chase McGehee AP

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 10:11 am

The Green Party nominated a Massachusetts physician and a formerly homeless single mother as their presidential and vice-presidential candidates for 2012 on Saturday. They say they are in it to win it, and — at the very least — to expand the electoral conversation to include people they say aren't represented by either Democrats or Republicans.

Amid waving green and white campaign signs in a conference room at a Baltimore Holiday Inn, the room erupted in cheers as Dr. Jill Stein won the delegate count.

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Europe
11:58 pm
Sat July 14, 2012

Running With The Bulls, But The Fear Is Financial

Summertime is Spain's festival season. Villages across the country will honor their patron saints with more wild parties. But come September, a hangover just might be waiting.
Jasper Juinen Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 4:07 pm

As a journalist, I came to Pamplona to see if Spain's dismal economy would dampen the spirit of the country's biggest summertime festival, the running of the bulls. Spaniards take their partying very seriously, and if there were even a hint of melancholy in their chants of "Viva San Fermin!" it might mean the economy devils had won.

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Economy
5:12 pm
Sat July 14, 2012

A Tale Of Two Cities: Too Many Jobs, Or Not Enough

Agriculture is a key job sector in Yuma, Ariz., where the seasonal workforce and migrant labor tend to boost the unemployment rate.
Jacob Lopez AP

Maria Arvizu continues to fill out job applications even though she has yet to deposit her last paycheck.

Arvizu, 53, relocated to Yuma, Ariz., to become a bus driver for the local school district last year. After school closed for summer break, she was caught off guard when she was laid off. She had expected to get another driving assignment and was denied collecting unemployment because she was still considered a school employee.

"I just keep looking for a job," Arvizu says.

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