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Economy
5:23 am
Sat April 21, 2012

What's It Worth?: Historic Detroit Mansion For Sale

Stone Hedge, a 10,000-square-foot Detroit mansion built in 1915 is listed at less than $450,000.
Jessica J. Trevino Detroit Free Press

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 6:40 am

Even before the financial crisis, Detroit was known for its undervalued real estate. Now, a bad situation is even worse.

Michael Bradley and his sister Annette Foreman have spent the last several months cleaning their mother's home. She died on Christmas Eve last year, and they're putting her house up for sale.

The four-story house, known as Stone Hedge, was originally built for Walter O. Briggs in 1915. Briggs was in the car business. His company built auto bodies, and he owned the Detroit Tigers.

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Europe
5:22 am
Sat April 21, 2012

Amid Europe's Debt Crisis, A Sharp Rise In Suicides

Mourners gather at the spot in front of the Greek parliament in Athens where 77-year-old retired pharmacist Dimitris Christoulas shot and killed himself on April 4. Christoulas left a note saying he did not want to end up scrounging for food in garbage bins.
Simela Pantzartzi EPA/Landov

Originally published on Sat April 21, 2012 7:47 pm

The eurozone crisis has been under way for three years and has led to sharp welfare cutbacks and a credit crunch throughout the continent.

But one of the most serious effects of the financial crisis has been an alarming spike in suicides in debt-burdened Greece, Ireland and Italy.

Last Wednesday, about a 1,000 people gathered in central Rome for a candle-lit vigil to honor Italy's economic victims. Statics show that from 2009 and 2010, some 400 small-business owners took their lives.

There have already been 23 crisis-related suicides since January.

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Europe
5:22 am
Sat April 21, 2012

Emerging Markets Promise IMF Financial Firepower

International Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde announced Friday that the IMF had raised $430 billion, surpassing its stated goal.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Sat April 21, 2012 9:46 am

International Monetary Fund officials and members of the G-20 nations announced Friday that member countries have pledged $430 billion to add to the Fund's crisis-fighting arsenal.

The Fund's managing director Christine Lagarde came into the annual World Bank-IMF spring meetings in Washington, D.C., with a goal of raising $400 billion from member states. She was clearly happy and relieved as she announced a number larger than that.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
3:02 am
Sat April 21, 2012

Science Writer Mary Roach Plays Not My Job

Originally published on Sat April 21, 2012 11:03 am

The science writer known for tackling death in her book Still, sex in her book Bonk and space travel in her latest book, Packing For Mars, takes a quiz in honor of the 25th anniversary of Super Mario Brothers. (Rebroadcast from Sept. 18, 2010)

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
3:02 am
Sat April 21, 2012

Novelist Carl Hiaasen Plays Not My Job

Originally published on Sat April 21, 2012 11:03 am

The Florida novelist tells us what he finds so weird and inspiring about South Florida and answers three questions about extreme cold-weather activities. (Rebroadcast from Feb. 5, 2011)

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
2:45 am
Sat April 21, 2012

Newbery Medal Winner Jack Gantos Plays Not My Job

Originally published on Sat April 21, 2012 11:03 am

Award-winning children's book author and recent recipient of the Newbery Honor joins us to talk about his other distinction: his arrest on drug smuggling charges. Then he takes a quiz on Harlequin romance novels. (Rebroadcast from Jan. 28, 2012)

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
2:45 am
Sat April 21, 2012

Novelist Tom Robbins Plays Not My Job

Originally published on Sat April 21, 2012 11:03 am

Author of Even Cowgirls Get the Blues, Skinny Legs and All, and most recently B is for Beer, joins us to talk about Seattle, taking LSD and answer questions about the other Mr. T. Robbins. (Rebroadcast from June 5, 2010)

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
2:45 am
Sat April 21, 2012

Writer Susan Orlean Plays Not My Job

Originally published on Sat April 21, 2012 11:03 am

New Yorker staff writer and author of the Orchid Thief and the recent biography of movie canine Rin Tin Tin takes a quiz on other things that sound like "Rin Tin Tin": Tintin, Tauntaun and TomTom. (Rebroadcast from Dec. 3, 2011)

Interviews
2:08 am
Sat April 21, 2012

Fresh Air Weekend: Carl Zimmer, The Three Stooges

After they leave their orphanage for the first time, Curly (Will Sasso) bears a heavy burden — his fellow Stooges, Moe (Chris Diamantopoulos, left) and Larry (Sean Hayes).
Peter Iovino Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation

Originally published on Sat April 21, 2012 10:58 am

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

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The Two-Way
5:37 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Three More Secret Service Employees Resign Over Prostitution Scandal

Update at 6:19 p.m. ET. Three Secret Service Agents Step Down:

The Secret Service confirmed that three "additional employees have chosen to resign" and a twelfth employee has been implicated.

"At this point, five employees continue to be on administrative leave and their security clearances remain suspended pending the outcome of this investigation," the agency said in a press release.

The three dismissals today brings the total number of agents forced out of the agency because of the scandal to six.

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The Disappearing Coast
5:06 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Two Years Later, BP Spill Reminders Litter Gulf Coast

Pictured here on April 13, 2011, Barataria Bay — part of Louisiana's Barataria Basin — was one of the hardest hit areas in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion. Today, obvious signs of the spill have faded, but communities are still reeling from its effects.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 5:17 pm

It's been two years since the Deepwater Horizon exploded in the Gulf of Mexico, killing 11 rig workers and unleashing the worst oil spill in U.S. history. The oil has long stopped flowing and BP spent billions of dollars to clean up oiled beaches and waterways, but the disaster isn't necessarily over.

Oil fouled some 1,100 miles of Gulf Coast shoreline, but today, in most spots, you can't see obvious signs of the spill. In Orange Beach, Ala., the clear emerald waters of the Gulf roll onto sugar-white sand beaches.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:49 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Couples Should Get Tested For HIV Together, WHO Says

What do you say we go get HIV tested together?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 9:05 am

The World Health Organization is telling couples around the world to get tested together to see if either is infected with HIV.

If one of them is, that partner should start treatment with anti-HIV drugs – even if it's not yet medically necessary.

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It's All Politics
3:43 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Presidential Fundraising Numbers Poised To Skyrocket

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 4:11 pm

The latest financial numbers are coming out Friday from the campaigns of President Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney — along with the superPACs that love them.

First, the easy numbers: $53 million was raised in March to re-elect Obama and $12.6 million was raised by the Romney campaign to win the Republican primaries.

But those easy numbers don't give a complete picture.

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'Radio Diaries'
3:43 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

The Artful Reinvention Of Klansman Asa Earl Carter

White Citizens' Council leader Asa Earl Carter denounces school integration in Clinton, Tenn., on Aug. 31, 1956.
AP

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 5:11 pm

In the early 1990s, The Education of Little Tree became a publishing phenomenon. It told the story of an orphan growing up and learning the wisdom of his Native American ancestors, Cherokee Texan author Forrest Carter's purported autobiography.

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The Two-Way
3:23 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

In First Test For Racial Justice Act, Judge Commutes Man's Death Sentence

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 3:31 pm

A North Carolina judge commuted the death sentence of convicted murderer Marcus Robinson saying racial bias tainted his trial and sentencing. Instead, Robinson will serve life in prison.

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Analysis
3:14 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Week In Politics: Election, Fed Scandals

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 5:06 pm

Melissa Block speaks with our regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution, and David Brooks of The New York Times.

Middle East
3:09 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

A Look Into The World Of Syria's First Lady

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 5:06 pm

A video appeal to the wife of Syrian President Bashar Assad asks her to persuade her husband to stop the killing. The campaign for Asma Assad to "stand up for peace" was started by the wives of British and German ambassadors to the United Nations. Melissa Block talks with Joan Juliet Buck, the last American journalist to spend time with the Assad family before the latest civil strife began in Syria.

Deceptive Cadence
2:36 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

To Russia, With Musical Love — After 22 Years' Absence

An advertisement in Moscow for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra's first concerts in Russia in more than two decades.
Todd Rosenberg Courtesy of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 5:06 pm

This week, music is bringing Americans and Russians together in a way that policy discussions never can. And don't call that a cliche in front of the music director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.

If U.S. relations with Russia have hit a sticky patch over Syria and other issues lately, that didn't stop the Chicago Symphony from thrilling a Russian audience this past Wednesday night, just as it did on its last visit — to the then-Soviet Union in 1990.

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Around the Nation
2:36 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Officials Resume Search For Boy Missing Since 1979

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 5:06 pm

Investigators in New York City are ripping up the basement of an apartment building in hopes of solving a decades-old mystery: What happened to 6-year-old Etan Patz? The first-grader was walking alone to his school bus stop when he disappeared. Melissa Block talks to journalist Lisa Cohen, author of After Etan: The Missing Child Case that Held America Captive.

Asia
2:34 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Slowly, Myanmar Dares To Believe Change Is Real

Girls perform a traditional dance while celebrating Thingyan, Myanmar's new year water festival, in Yangon, on April 15. The new year has brought new hope as the country undergoes rapid political change.
Soe Zeya Tun Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 5:06 pm

In Myanmar, there are signs in the most unlikely places that people are starting to believe recent political reforms are for real, and aren't just a trick.

Take a recent performance of the Moustache Brothers vaudeville troupe in the northern city of Mandalay.

The troupe performs in the family home — it's not allowed to perform in public. Its biting political satire, aimed at the generals and their cronies, has made the troupe a favorite of Western tourists and diplomats.

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The Salt
1:53 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

For Most Of Human History, Being An Omnivore Was No Dilemma

Gorillas are fine with being herbivores, like this one at a Seattle zoo. But humans evolved as omnivores. Is diet destiny?
Ted S. Warren AP

If diet is destiny, then modern humans should thank our ancestors for their ability to eat just about anything.

Two new studies peek into the distant past to try to figure out just how big a role food played in human evolution. One says that eating meat made it possible for early human mothers to wean babies earlier and have more children.

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Science
1:50 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Exploring The Deepest, Darkest Spots On Earth

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. We're here in California, broadcasting from the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. And just outside the Golden Gate, of course, is the Pacific Ocean. It is the largest body of water on Earth, and its trenches are also the deepest. You could put Mount Everest into some of them, and the top would not even peek out.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:25 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Dutch Government Set To Reconsider Restrictions On Bird Flu Study

Chickens were killed in Hong Kong last December in an effort to halt the spread of the deadly H5N1 strain of bird flu.
Aaron Tam AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 9:08 am

A Dutch virologist is considering his full range of legal options if his government refuses to lift the restrictions it has put on his controversial bird flu research, and matters could quickly come to a head after a meeting next Monday that will be attended by U. S. observers.

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The Two-Way
1:12 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Bus Crash In Mexico Leaves 43 Dead

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 1:16 pm

There's another bit of tragic news to report today: 43 people are dead after a truck crashed into a passenger bus in eastern Mexico today. Authorities told the AFP that the incident happened after a trailer came loose and hit a bus carrying agricultural workers headed to work.

The AP reports:

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Europe
1:08 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

In France, Fiery Leftist Candidate Strikes A Nerve

Jean-Luc Melenchon, the Left Front presidential candidate, draws huge crowds, rivaling those of mainstream candidates Nicolas Sarkozy and Francois Hollande. Here, he delivers a speech during a campaign meeting on April 1 in Grigny, outside Paris.
Bertrand Langlois AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 5:06 pm

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Shots - Health Blog
12:46 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Exercising Even A Little Bit Makes It Easier For Smokers To Quit

A competitor stops for a cigarette after he broke down during the Enduropale race at Le Touquet Beach on February 22, 2009 in Le Touquet, France.
Paul Gilham Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 9:16 am

Smoking is bad. Quitting smoking is hard. But exercising can make quitting easier, and make sliding back into smoking less likely.

That's the word from a big new study, which tracked the health and habits of 434,190 people in Taiwan from 1996 to 2008. Smokers who got just 15 minutes of exercise a day were 55 percent more likely to quit than were people who weren't active at all. And those active smokers were 43 percent less likely to relapse when they did quit.

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The Two-Way
12:38 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

The Pineapple And The Hare: Can You Answer Two Bizarre State Exam Questions?

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 6:09 pm

A story and two questions on the New York state English exam taken by eighth-graders this week has stumped many — including Jeopardy! star Ken Jennings.

The story — titled The Pineapple and the Hare — was included in a New York Daily News story about the consternation the questions have caused.

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NPR Story
12:14 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

How Movie Makers Use Science To Make Magic

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 1:58 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. We're here in California, broadcasting from the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. And while you might think Silicon Valley or biotech when you think of Northern California, this part of the state is also home to some of the biggest names in the movie business.

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NPR Story
12:14 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Untangling The Hairy Physics Of Rapunzel

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 1:59 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Joining us now is our multimedia editor Flora Lichtman who is - welcome to SCIENCE FRIDAY, of course.

FLORA LICHTMAN, BYLINE: Thanks.

FLATOW: We'll have a backend. We have our Video Pick of the Week today, sort of an oldie goldie, right?

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NPR Story
12:14 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Designing A Bridge For Earthquake Country

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 1:56 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. Where is the safest place to be during an earthquake? Yeah. Here, in San Francisco, everybody is shaking their head.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

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