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The Torch
3:53 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

Olympic Sports We Don't See Any More, And Why

Who needs two hands? At the 1904 Olympics in St. Louis, the events included All Around Dumbell, which comprised 10 one- and two-handed lifts.
Chicago History Museum/Library of Congress

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 4:14 pm

The Olympic Games are one of the most tradition-bound sporting events in the world. But that doesn't mean its sporting events are written in stone.

Since 1894, dozens of events have had their flash in the pan, and been dumped. Some have lasted only one Olympic cycle. The website Top End Sports has a nice collection of discontinued Olympic events.

Here are some of my favorite one-and-dones:

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Shots - Health Blog
3:46 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

Tie My Shoes, Please: How Persuasion Works

Can You Help Me Tie My Shoe? Researchers found that when study participants were asked an unusual request, they were more likely later on to perform a favor.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 4:23 pm

Marketers, managers and panhandlers all have something in common: They regularly want to make you do things they want. Marketers want you to buy stuff, managers want you to finish projects on time, and panhandlers want you to spare a buck, or three.

Over the years, psychologists have studied the techniques of manipulation and found several that seem to work. (Read on only if you agree to use these techniques for good and not for evil!)

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NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
3:39 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

We Got The Beat: The 'Heart' Of Your City

Wes Breitenbach of Knoxville, Tenn., says the Tennessee River offers everything from moments of solitude to live music, "right in the heart of downtown."
Courtesy of Wes Breitenbach

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 3:46 pm

When you think about where you live, what sights and sounds come to mind? The coffee shop on the corner? The park down the street? We asked you to show us what makes your city thump and pulse, and here is some of what you shared. But we want to fill our heart with city love, so send us more! (Note: Captions have been edited for length, style and clarity.)

AIDS: A Turning Point
3:25 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

D.C.'s Black Churches Take Steps In AIDS Fight

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 9:11 am

As thousands gather in Washington, D.C., for the International AIDS Conference, the city is battling disturbing levels of HIV/AIDS, particularly in the black community.

According to the D.C. Department of Health, 4.3 percent of the black population in the city is living with the disease, and some advocates argue that black churches should be doing more to fight it.

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World
3:08 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

Whistleblower Law Unlikely To Help Italy's Migrants

African migrants fired from Italian factories in the north have joined the swelling ranks of people searching for agriculture work in the south. Originally from Burkina Faso, Karim Suruku (right) is a migrant worker in Calabria in southern Italy. At left is Amidou Denamidou.
Sylvia Poggioli NPR

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 5:19 pm

Italy recently approved a decree that would grant work and residence permits to migrants who blow the whistle on bosses who exploit them in the economy illegally.

But in places like the southern region of Calabria, the law has little chance of being applied at a time when the economic crisis increasingly fosters an illegal, underground economy.

The main activity in Calabria is agriculture. Thanks to vast citrus fields, it's one of the major stops for migratory workers, mostly Africans without legal documents.

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NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
3:06 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

A City Faces Its 'Berlin Wall': An Interstate Highway

A sign for Interstate 81 sits under an overpass in Syracuse, N.Y. City officials and residents are debating what to do about an aging stretch of the highway that cuts through the city.
Zack Seward for NPR

Originally published on Thu July 26, 2012 11:25 am

Interstate 81 runs through the heart of Syracuse, N.Y., where a 1.4-mile-long elevated stretch of the highway is known locally as "the viaduct." Like many road projects built in the middle of the last century, I-81 is bumping up against the end of its life span. While officials say it's still safe to drive on, the highway is crumbling in parts.

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From Our Listeners
2:36 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

Letters: Leaving Home And Making New Friends

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

It's Tuesday, and time to read from your comments. Last week, we spoke with Sally Koslow about the difficulties many young people experience as try to leave home and why the lack of jobs and enormous student loan debt can soon send them back to live with mom and dad. Chris Mall(ph) in Bradford, New Hampshire, responded: I don't know a single boomerang child who doesn't want to be self-sufficient. Ms. Koslow fails to recognize that young people are not letting opportunities pass by, he wrote. Those opportunities are no longer available.

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Medical Treatments
2:36 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

Researchers Renewing Focus On AIDS Cure

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Since the early years of the AIDS epidemic, talk of a cure became almost taboo. In the past few years, advances in prevention and treatment became increasingly effective. Now some researchers say it's time to shift focus and resources to finding a cure. So why now, what's changed, and how close are we? If you have questions about the search for a cure for HIV/AIDS, give us a call: 800-989-8255. Email us: talk@npr.org. You can join the conversation on our website as well. That's at npr.org.

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The Two-Way
2:25 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

CBO: Supreme Court Ruling On Health Care Saves U.S. $84 Billion Over 11 Years

Susan Clark argues with another protester about the Affordable Care Act outside the U.S. Supreme Court.
Kris Connor Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 11:23 pm

A new report from the Congressional Budget Office finds that the Supreme Court ruling on President Obama's health care law will save the government $84 billion over the next 11 years.

While the Supreme Court upheld the Affordable Healthcare Act, it also said it was up to states to choose whether to participate in an expansion of Medicaid.

That $84 billion in savings, the non-partisan CBO explained, comes from predictions that fewer states will enroll in the program.

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The Two-Way
1:57 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

Waitress, There's A Spy In My Soup (Or At Least There's One Serving It)

You might want to watch what you say. A screen grab from one of many videos taken by diners at a North Korean restaurant. This one is in Phnom Penh, Cambodia.
YouTube

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 2:02 pm

It's no secret that the government of North Korea has been pushing to open restaurants in cities around the world.

NPR's Peter Kenyon told that story back in December, 2010.

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The Two-Way
1:55 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

Woman, Who Was In Theater During Shooting, Gives Birth

A bit of sunshine from Colorado: Katie Medley, who was with her husband in the Aurora theater when a gunman opened fire, gave birth a to baby boy this morning.

Hugo Jackson Medley was born at 7:11 a.m., The Denver Post reports. Mom and baby are doing well.

The AP reports that Medley came out of the mass shooting OK, but her husband Caleb Medley was shot in the head and he remains in critical condition.

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NPR Story
1:31 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

After Ryan White's Death, Elton John Took On AIDS

Elton John speaks at the International Aids Conference in Washington, D.C., on Monday.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 12:05 pm

During the 1980s, musician Elton John watched many of his friends and loved ones suffer and die from HIV and AIDS. Lost in a drug-fueled haze, he says, he did nothing to help people with the disease.

Then he met Ryan White, a teenage hemophiliac who was shunned by his community after contracting HIV. Ryan's struggle and eventual death marked a turning point for John. He entered rehab and became a vocal advocate for AIDS research, prevention and treatment, creating the Elton John AIDS Foundation.

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Europe
1:31 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

Political Crisis Behind The Faltering Eurozone

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 2:36 pm

Spain's recession has deepened and Spanish borrowing rates are at the highest level since the euro was introduced in 1999. Walter Russell Mead of The American Interest and Steven Erlanger of the New York Times talk about the long-term political effects of the euro crisis.

National Security
1:31 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

A Case For Continued 'Forward Engagement'

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 2:36 pm

Now is not the time to pull back on military and foreign engagement, according to former Undersecretary of Defense Michele Flournoy. In Foreign Affairs, she argues that strategic military deployments abroad, a policy of "forward engagement," help preserve the United States' standing in the world.

Shots - Health Blog
1:26 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

How To Make Condoms For Women Fashionable

At the International AIDS conference, a female condom fashion show raised awareness about the rising need for more female condoms. Olwin Manyanye of Zimbabwe shows off one of the dresses decorated with a second-generation female condom, called "FC2."
Benjamin Morris NPR

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 4:24 pm

Two of the more colorful events at the 19th International AIDS Conference so far are focused on a single message: The world needs more female condoms.

The first event was an intimate fashion show Monday night, featuring dresses made with female condoms. Highlights of the show included a beautiful baby-doll dress layered with white condoms and a yellow miniskirt covered with condoms twisted into roses.

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Author Interviews
1:04 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

'The Twilight War' Between The U.S. And Iran

David Crist's father, George (left), discusses operations against Iranian attack boats with Navy Lt. Paul Hillenbrand. George Crist, a Marine Corps general, was commander of CENTCOM from 1985-1988.
Courtesy of David Crist

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 2:54 pm

In The Twilight War, government historian David Crist outlines the secret history of America's 30-year conflict with Iran. The book, based on interviews with hundreds of officials as well as classified military archives, details how the covert war has spanned five American presidential terms and repeatedly threatened to bring the two nations into open warfare.

Crist tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that there have been several incidents that have almost resulted in battle over the past 30 years.

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Commentary
1:04 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

Swearing: A Long And #%@&$ History

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 3:29 pm

Sometimes it's small government you need to keep your eye on. Take Middleborough, Mass., whose town meeting recently imposed a $20 fine for swearing in public. According to the police chief, the ordinance was aimed at the crowds of unruly teenagers who gathered downtown at night yelling profanities at people, not just someone who slams a finger in a car door. But whatever the exact idea was, nobody thought it was a good one.

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The Torch
1:00 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

For Opening Ceremonies, An Olympic Secret Is Hard To Keep

March of the Nurses: A group of performers waits to rehearse their role in the Olympics Opening Ceremony Friday.
Vickie Walton-James NPR

With the London 2012 Opening Ceremony just days away, armies of costumed performers are rehearsing in Olympic Park.

In the bowels of the stadium, dancers, acrobats and actors wait patiently for their turn on the field. Gentlemen in top hats use cellphones to take pictures of each other. Chimney sweeps step outside to have a smoke. In the stands are thousands of people lucky enough to have scored tickets to watch dress rehearsals.

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The Two-Way
12:53 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

Ghana's President, John Evans Atta Mills, Is Dead

President John Atta Mills at a campaign event in 2004.
Issouf Sanogo AFP/Getty Images

The president of Ghana, John Evans Atta Mills, has died at age 68, the Ghana News Agency reports.

As the AP reports, Mills ran three times for president and finally emerged the victor in 2009, promising to reform the West African country.

The AP adds:

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The Salt
12:43 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

Hold The Ice: Rhetoric Gets Hot Over New York's Big Soda Ban

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 1:11 pm

Ever since New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced that he plans to ban big sodas from the streets of New York City to address the city's obesity problem, drink companies, soda fans, and libertarians have been wanting to treat him like a Glee kid and give him a big Slushee in the face.

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The Two-Way
12:26 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

Feel-Good Photo: Gabrielle Giffords Atop A Mountain In France

Former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (center) and her husband Mark Kelly (right), at the peak of Aiguille du Midi in the French Alps on Monday. Behind them is mountain guide Vincent Lameyre.
Denis Balibouse Reuters /Landov

After four days of sadly serious news about what happened in Aurora, Colo., here's a photo that may lift your heart.

Reuters explains that former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., rode a two-stage cable car on Monday to the peak of Aiguille du Midi in the French Alps. That's 12,605-feet above sea level.

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The Two-Way
12:24 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

Peg Perego Recalls 223,000 Strollers Due To Strangulation Risk

The models of strollers being recalled.
Peg Perego

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 1:16 pm

One child strangled to death and another nearly strangled when their heads were caught between the tray and the seat bottom of their Peg Perego strollers. The Italian company is now issuing a recall for 223,000 strollers that were sold in the United States from Jan. of 2004 and Sept. 2007 and

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission says:

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The Two-Way
12:10 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

Wal-Mart Urgest Retailers To Reject $6 Billion Settlement With Visa, MasterCard

A van covered by a mural sits parked outside a Walt-Mart Super Center in Mexico City.
Dieu Nalio Chery AP

Wal-Mart, the world's biggest retailer, says its peers should reject the $6 billion settlement reached over fees charged on credit card purchases.

As we reported, Visa and MasterCard agreed to pay more than $6 billion to settle complaints from retailers that it prohibited them from imposing surcharges on customers using those cards. Those complaints have existed for years.

The AP reports:

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It's All Politics
11:25 am
Tue July 24, 2012

At VFW, Romney Seeks To Dull Obama's National Security Sheen

Members of the Veterans of Foreign Wars look on Monday as President Obama speaks during the group's national convention in Reno, Nev. Republican Mitt Romney was scheduled to speak to the group on Tuesday.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 2:23 pm

(Revised @ 3:19 pm ET)

In a result few predicted before he became commander in chief, President Obama exhibits surprising strength with voters on national security issues.

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The Torch
11:18 am
Tue July 24, 2012

Watch The London Olympics Online: A Guide To Online Video And Mobile Apps

The NBC Olympics app will include different levels of streaming video. The network requires registration for access to its live content from London.
NBC

Originally published on Thu July 26, 2012 2:44 am

If you love to watch the Olympics, this is your year: NBC is pumping out more than 5,500 hours of video for your TV and digital devices. We've covered that before — but how do you go about watching?

Here's a guide to how you can keep up with the Summer Games:

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The Two-Way
11:14 am
Tue July 24, 2012

Pennsylvania Monsignor Sentenced To 3 To 6 Years In Prison

Monsignor William Lynn exits the Criminal Justice Center on Tuesday in Philadelphia.
Matt Rourke AP

Monsignor William Lynn, who became the first Catholic leader convicted in the church sex abuse scandal, was sentenced to three to six years in prison.

The AP reports:

"The former secretary for clergy at the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, handled priest assignments and child sexual assault complaints from 1992 to 2004.

"Judge M. Teresa Sarmina said Lynn enabled 'monsters in clerical garb ... to destroy the souls of children, to whom you turned a hard heart.'

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Krulwich Wonders...
11:10 am
Tue July 24, 2012

Which Is Bigger: A Human Brain Or The Universe?

Robert Krulwich NPR

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 12:46 pm

This is one of those fun-to-think-about questions. A brain isn't much to look at, after all. It's about the size of your two fists put together, three pounds to hold, but oh my, what it can do.

With our brains, we can think backwards, imagine forwards, conjure, create things that don't exist, leap vast distances. For example, suppose I say to you, close your eyes and imagine this:

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Around the Nation
10:52 am
Tue July 24, 2012

Will Colo. Shooting Change Gun Debate?

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 9:47 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. In a few minutes we will remember the first American woman in space, Sally Ride. She died yesterday after a 17-month battle with pancreatic cancer. We will talk with two other trailblazing women in the space program in just a few minutes and they'll tell us about her life and legacy.

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Remembrances
10:52 am
Tue July 24, 2012

The Humility And Determination Of Sally Ride

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 9:47 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, as sports fans around the world look forward to the start of the Olympics, we'll check in with a star of the U.S. women's soccer team, Sydney Leroux. We'll have that conversation in just a few minutes.

But first, we are taking a closer look at the life and legacy of a pioneering American, Sally Ride, the first American woman in space. She died yesterday after a battle with pancreatic cancer. She was 61 years old.

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Shots - Health Blog
10:51 am
Tue July 24, 2012

Needle Exchanges Often Overlooked In AIDS Fight

A heroin user keeps a syringe tucked behind his ear at a park in the city of Medan on Indonesia's Sumatra island. Cordita-Caritas Medan, a nongovernmental organization active there, works to reduce HIV infections through rehab of drug users and a needle exchange program.
Sutanta Aditya AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 3:13 pm

There's a lot of buzz at the 19th International AIDS Conference about powerful new strategies to prevent HIV infection.

But a potent old strategy isn't used enough around the world, many researchers say, and is even neglected entirely in places where it's most urgently needed.

It's called needle exchange.

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