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Middle East
3:34 am
Tue May 29, 2012

Syria's Problems Cross Border Into Lebanoan

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 5:18 am

Recent sectarian violence has claimed the lives of more than a dozen people in Lebanon. The fighting was sparked by the conflict in neighboring Syria. Analysts fear that without uniform leadership in Lebanon, and a workable solution to stop the violence in Syria, a regional sectarian war is in the offing.

Europe
3:34 am
Tue May 29, 2012

Spanish Police Accused Of Racially Profiling

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 5:02 am

Amnesty International has scolded Madrid police for allegedly instituting monthly quotas for detaining minorities. Some Africans and Latinos complain of being stopped for ID checks several times a day, solely based on the color of their skin. They say the practice is on the rise, as Spain's economy falters.

Author Interviews
2:05 am
Tue May 29, 2012

The First Lady Cultivates 'American Grown' Gardening

First lady Michelle Obama tends to the presidential garden during the third annual White House kitchen garden fall harvest in October 2011. The last vegetable garden planted at the White House was Eleanor Roosevelt's victory garden.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 3:34 am

One of the first things Michelle Obama did as first lady was to dig up part of the beautifully manicured South Lawn of the White House and plant a vegetable garden. The garden was just one of Obama's many efforts to encourage Americans to eat nutritious food and live healthier lives. Her latest project, a book called American Grown, is a diary of that garden through the seasons and a portrait of gardening in America, past and present.

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It's All Politics
2:04 am
Tue May 29, 2012

Dire Predictions Amid Another Looming Fiscal Battle

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 10:27 am

There are growing warnings on Capitol Hill that the nation could be rolling toward an end-of-the-year fiscal train wreck.

"The looming tax hike will be absolutely devastating," Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said.

"You can call this a fiscal cliff. You can call it 'Taxmageddon' as others have done. Whatever you call it, it will be a disaster for the middle class," Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, added.

And Sen. Ben Nelson, D-Neb., said: "It's a tsunami; there's no question about it, and it's coming."

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House & Senate Races
2:02 am
Tue May 29, 2012

Texas Senate Hopefuls Woo Republicans Of All Stripes

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 3:34 am

It's high noon in Texas at the Stephenville Community Center out on Highway 67, and the Cross Timbers Republican Women's Club Candidates Forum is about to begin.

Time has run out on this Republican Senate primary. This is a last chance for the candidates to make an impression before Tuesday's vote. They're vying to replace Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison, who is retiring after serving for nearly 20 years.

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American Dreams: Then And Now
2:02 am
Tue May 29, 2012

American Dream Faces Harsh New Reality

The American Dream has long evoked the idea that the next generation will have a better life than the previous one. Today, many Americans feel that dream is in jeopardy.
H. Armstron Roberts CORBIS

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 3:34 am

The American Dream is a crucial thread in this country's tapestry, woven through politics, music and culture.

Though the phrase has different meanings to different people, it suggests an underlying belief that hard work pays off and that the next generation will have a better life than the previous generation.

But three years after the worst recession in almost a century, the American Dream now feels in jeopardy to many.

The town of Lorain, Ohio, used to embody this dream. It was a place where you could get a good job, raise a family and comfortably retire.

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Family Matters: The Money Squeeze
2:01 am
Tue May 29, 2012

Family Matters: Pitching In To Take Care Of Grandma

Chris Martin, 14, greets his great-grandmother AnnaBelle Bowers, 87, who lives part time with the Martin family in Harrisburg, Pa.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 8:18 am

On a recent evening, the Martin family of Harrisburg, Pa., had too many places it needed to be.

AnnaBelle Bowers, the 87-year-old matriarch of the family who is also known as "Snootzie," was at home — watching television and getting ready for bed.

Someone needed to care for her. That fell to Chris Martin, her 14-year-old great-grandson.

His willingness to stay at home meant his sister, Lauren, could play in a softball game.

It also meant her parents, David and LaDonna Martin, could watch.

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Family Matters: The Money Squeeze
1:57 am
Tue May 29, 2012

Listening To Parents Key To Financial Responsibility

Parents can make a difference in whether their kids become spenders or savers, studies find.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 3:34 am

As an increasing number of Americans live into their 80s and 90s, many families are struggling to find ways to make retirement dollars — that were once supposed to support seniors for years — now stretch over decades.

More and more, families have to care for the very elderly, as well as look after children who might be college grads but haven't found a job in a difficult economy.

All this requires one very important thing: lots of money.

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The Two-Way
4:28 pm
Mon May 28, 2012

Russia Denies It's Hiding Details Of Holocaust Hero Raoul Wallenberg's Fate

Originally published on Sun June 3, 2012 7:29 am

Raoul Wallenberg is credited with saving thousands of Jews in Budapest during the Nazi occupation by giving them Swedish travel papers or moving them to safe houses. The Swedish diplomat was arrested by the Soviet Red Army more than six decades ago. His fate has been a mystery ever since.

On Monday, the chief archivist of Russia's counterintelligence service said the agency will continue searching for clues about his fate.

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Asia
3:01 pm
Mon May 28, 2012

For Future Energy, Volcanic Indonesia Bets On Heat

A local resident entertains visitors to the Kawah Kamojang geothermal field in West Java. He puts a length of bamboo to the steam coming from the ground to make a whistle, then throws soda cans into the vent, which shoots them high into the air. The Dutch colonial government drilled Indonesia's first geothermal wells at Kamojang in 1926, when the country was still known as the Dutch East Indies.
Yosef Riadi for NPR

Originally published on Mon May 28, 2012 10:30 pm

Indonesia, the country with the world's largest number of active volcanoes, is betting that all the hot rocks will provide a clean and reliable energy source for the future.

The country is believed have 40 percent of the world's geothermal energy resources. But making geothermal energy economically feasible will require adjusting the country's heavily subsidized energy prices. And that issue is a political hot potato.

Unused Potential

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Technology
3:01 pm
Mon May 28, 2012

As Headphones Invade The Office, Are We Lonelier?

As headphones and earbuds become common in the workplace, sometimes even co-workers sitting next to each other are communicating online.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon May 28, 2012 3:33 pm

Headphones or earbuds are becoming common in the workplace. Not just for listening to music on a break, they allow people to tune out their co-workers all day long. But in many cases, those same co-workers are still communicating — online.

Melissa Gore, a project manager at Huge, a Brooklyn, N.Y., digital branding agency, works side-by-side at long tables with hundreds of others. But she doesn't hear the chatter and commotion.

"I just have some headphones on," she says. "I get in the zone with Spotify and sometimes people have to wave their hand in front of me."

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All Tech Considered
3:01 pm
Mon May 28, 2012

Long Before The Internet, The Linotype Sped Up The News

Thomas Edison called the linotype the "eighth wonder of the world."
Copyright Linotype: The Film

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 9:17 am

As part of a new tech segment, we're occasionally going to be looking at a concept, invention or tool that's altered the way the world works. To start things off, we asked Doug Wilson, director of Linotype: The Film, to tell us about — what else? — the linotype.

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NPR Story
2:56 pm
Mon May 28, 2012

Clogged Ketchup No More With MIT's 'LiquiGlide'

Originally published on Mon May 28, 2012 3:14 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This being Memorial Day, many of you have been flipping burgers, spearing hot dogs and then whacking a ketchup bottle to try to coax that stubborn glob of red stuff out onto the bun.

Well, a team of scientists at MIT has decided that this ketchup-to-bottle adhesion is a problem that must be fixed and they've come up with a solution. Adam Paxson, what's the solution called?

ADAM PAXSON: We are calling it LiquiGlide.

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Afghanistan
2:43 pm
Mon May 28, 2012

Afghan Female Boxers Strike A Blow For Girl Power

An Afghan girl takes part in a boxing training session around in a training room at the Kabul stadium, in Kabul in January 2011.
Shah Marai Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 19, 2012 7:52 pm

When Saber Sharifi goes out recruiting girls and young women for his female boxing team in Afghanistan, he encounters a lot of skeptical parents.

"I reassure them that their daughters will not have broken noses on their wedding day," he says with a smile.

Sharifi launched his recruiting campaign in girls' high schools back in 2007. After three months of relentless speeches and presentations, he could only get two girls to sign up.

But he didn't give up. After two more years, he had eight more members on the team.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:22 pm
Mon May 28, 2012

With PSA Testing, The Power Of Anecdote Often Trumps Statistics

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 8:46 am

Millions of men and their doctors are trying to understand a federal task force's recommendation against routine use of a prostate cancer test called the PSA.

The guidance, which came out last week, raises basic questions about how to interpret medical evidence. And what role expert panels should play in how doctors practice.

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Movies
1:00 pm
Mon May 28, 2012

A Selective Preview Of Summer Movies

Pixar's Brave follows the independent and courageous Merida (voice by Kelly Macdonald).
Pixar

Originally published on Mon June 4, 2012 2:01 pm

Forget the calendar. With The Avengers, Battleship, and Men In Black already battling aliens at the multiplex, Hollywood's summer has arguably been under way for weeks.

No doubt, the tent-pole blockbusters — Ridley Scott's Prometheus, The Amazing Spider-Man, The Bourne Legacy, and the rest — will offer plenty of entertainment value, but there are a couple of hardy, resourceful little girls you might want to attend to, too.

Beasts of the Southern Wild (June 27)

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All Tech Considered
12:46 pm
Mon May 28, 2012

Vintage Spy Plane Gives High-Tech Drone A Run For Its Money

The Air Force's U-2 spy plane first took flight in August 1955 and has been in commission ever since.
USAF Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 28, 2012 3:01 pm

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U.S.
12:27 pm
Mon May 28, 2012

In Sweat Lodge, Vets Find Healing 'Down To The Core'

Veterans make preparations for a sweat lodge ceremony at Salt Lake City's Veterans Affairs center.
Taki Telonidis for NPR

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 6:38 am

Substance abuse. Violence. Even thoughts of suicide. These are some of the problems that many veterans returning home from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are struggling with.

Today it's called post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, but it has affected veterans going back much farther. While doctors and researchers put enormous efforts into developing new treatments, one group of veterans in Salt Lake City is finding relief in a very old tradition: a Native American sweat lodge.

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Africa
12:09 pm
Mon May 28, 2012

Islamist Tops Egypt's Vote Count, But Run-off Needed

Mohammed Morsi, the Muslim Brotherhood's presidential candidate, was the leading vote getter in Egypt's presidential election last week. But he did not get an outright majority and will face a run-off on June 16-17 against a former prime minister. He's shown here during a campaign rally.
Fredrik Persson AP

The runoff vote for Egypt's next president will pit the Muslim Brotherhood's candidate against the last prime minister to serve under Hosni Mubarak, according to full official results released Monday by the election commission.

Commission chief Farouq Sultan told a news conference that the Brotherhood's Mohammed Morsi and Ahmed Shafiq, a former air force commander and a longtime friend of the ousted leader, were the top two finishers in the first round of voting held on May 23-24.

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Middle East
10:07 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Ex-Mubarak PM, Islamist In Egyptian Runoff

Originally published on Mon May 28, 2012 11:43 am

In Egypt, Ahmed Shafiq and the Muslim Brotherhood candidate, Mohammed Morsi, will face each other in a runoff election next month. David Greene talks with NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson about what these results might mean for Egypt's future.

Music Interviews
7:03 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Catherine Russell: An In-Studio Fresh Air Concert

Catherine Russell.
Stefan Falke

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 6:49 am

This interview was originally broadcast on February 21, 2011.

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Middle East
6:39 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Syrian Government Denies Role In Houla Massacre

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The United Nations special envoy to Syria, Kofi Annan, is in Damascus today to urge the Syrian government to abide by a ceasefire that most agree has been a failure - this after a horrific massacre over the weekend that left more than 100 people dead, nearly half of them children. Witnesses say Syrian army troops shelled a residential area, and then pro-government militias moved in and went on a killing spree. NPR's Kelly McEvers joins us from Beirut. And, Kelly, what happened in this village?

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Health Care
5:10 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Sick In America: Americans' Views On Health Care

Morning Edition's Renee Montagne talks with Dr. Elliott Fisher, director of Dartmouth's Center for Population Health, about the issues raised in our series "Sick in America." NPR, along with Harvard and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, recently surveyed 1,500 Americans on their views about the cost and quality of health care.

Election 2012
4:49 am
Mon May 28, 2012

For A Billionaire, $2M Gets You Superdonor Status

Bill Koch (center) celebrates his team's 1992 America's Cup win. Koch, the brother of billionaire GOP donors Charles and David, has given $2 million to the superPAC backing Mitt Romney.
Vince Bucci AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 28, 2012 9:25 am

In the world of high-dollar politics, the billionaire industrialists David and Charles Koch are famous for their lavish funding of conservative politicians and causes. But there's another Koch brother — William — who is passionate about many things, but only recently about politics.

Bill Koch is an avid yachtsman, and he set out to win the 1992 America's Cup. It would take four boats, more than 260 team members and single-minded determination.

David Rosow was the team's business manager and is a longtime friend of Koch's.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:49 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Patients Find Each Other Online To Jump-Start Medical Research

Katherine Leon says she spends up to 12 hours a day online interacting with others who share her rare heart condition.
Emily Bogle NPR

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 10:17 am

People with extremely rare diseases are often scattered across the world, and any one hospital has a hard time locating enough individuals to conduct meaningful research.

But one woman with an extremely rare heart condition managed to do what many hospitals couldn't. Katherine Leon connected with enough people online to interest the Mayo Clinic in a research trial.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:49 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Patients Crusade For Access To Their Medical Device Data

Hugo Campos' implantable cardioverter-defibrillator was a mystery to him. So he decided to ask his doctor for access to the data. He made this image with one of his own X-rays.
Hugo Campos

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 7:19 am

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Dead Stop
4:49 am
Mon May 28, 2012

The Graveyard Of Shelved Ice Cream Flavors

Headstones in Ben and Jerry's "Flavor Graveyard" are dedicated to bygone favorites such as Oh Pear (1997), Makin' Whoopie Pie (2002-2003), and Urban Jumble (2000-2001). Click the enlargement for a detailed view.
Ben and Jerry's

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 9:19 am

The first installment in Dead Stop, Morning Edition's summer road trip series about interesting gravesites in America.

When the Ben and Jerry's ice cream company kills a flavor, it's treated with respect — including a burial in the company's "Flavor Graveyard."

"I think we've got the best, and the not-best, up here," Sean Greenwood, Ben and Jerry's Grand Poobah of Publicity, says from the cemetery in Waterbury, Vt.

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Europe
4:49 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Spanish Lender Gets $24 Billion Lifeline

Spain's third largest lender, Bankia, is getting a $24 billion lifeline from the Spanish government. The move is a part of Madrid's effort to return some stability to the country's struggling financial sector.

Around the Nation
4:49 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Secrets To A Happy Marriage: Matching Outfits?

Originally published on Mon May 28, 2012 5:24 am

Mel and Joey Schwanke have been married 64 years. The Fremont, Neb., couple appears to be the perfect match — perhaps their secret is matching outfits. The Schwankes told Omaha's KETV they've dressed alike for decades. They've got a closet full of 146 combinations. Mel's tie always matches the patterns on Joey's dresses.

Around the Nation
4:49 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Controversy Rages Over Farm Safety Rules For Teens

Originally published on Mon May 28, 2012 5:25 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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