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The Two-Way
12:54 pm
Tue August 14, 2012

Leader Of Anti-Semitic Party In Hungary Discovers He's Jewish

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 3:11 pm

There's a story out of Hungary that has received quite a bit of play from the religious press but hadn't quite risen to the mainstream until the AP ran a piece about it today.

It's quite dramatic with an incredible plot twist: One of the leaders of Hungary's Jobbik Party, which the Anti-Defamation League says is one of the few political parties in Europe to overtly campaign with anti-Semitic materials, has discovered that he is himself a Jew.

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Author Interviews
12:03 pm
Tue August 14, 2012

Climate 'Weirdness' Throws Ecosystems 'Out Of Kilter'

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the past year through June 2012 has been the hottest year in the continental U.S. since modern record-keeping started in 1895. Above, New Yorkers flocked to Coney Island to try to beat the heat in early August.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 12:47 pm

Science journalist Michael Lemonick doesn't want to be a doomsday prophet, but he does want to be realistic about the threat of climate change. "Since I started writing about climate change all the way back in 1987, we've known what the cause is, we've known what the likely outcome is, and we've had time to act — and essentially we haven't acted," he tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies.

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The Two-Way
12:01 pm
Tue August 14, 2012

Multiple Suicide Attacks Cause Double-Digit Death Toll In Afghanistan

Suicide bombers struck in a normally peaceful area of southwestern Afghanistan today.

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The Two-Way
11:50 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Commission Says Penn State's Accreditation Is 'In Jeopardy'

Penn State during the football team's media day in State College, Pa., on Thursday.
Gene J. Puskar AP

The commission in charge of accrediting universities in the Mid-Atlantic region has warned Penn State that if it doesn't make changes in light of the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse scandal, it could lose its accreditation.

The Middle States Commission on Higher Education put the university "on warning," the AP reports, saying that it wants a report on how the university is complying with integrity standards.

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Participation Nation
11:32 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Blind Stokers Club In San Diego, Calif.

Captain and stoker in the BSC.
Evan Rasmussen Courtesy of the BSC

In tandem bicycle lingo, the captain is in the front, the stoker in the back.

The San Diego-based Blind Stokers Club, founded by Dave White, pairs sighted captains with blind stokers on high performance tandem bikes. As part of a year-round cycling program, members train for Cycling for Sight, a three-day, 200-mile event that benefits the San Diego Center for the Blind.

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Arts & Life
10:30 am
Tue August 14, 2012

With Ryan's Ascent, A Few Thoughts On 'Entitlement'

Rep. Paul Ryan has made changes to social safety net programs like Medicare and Social Security — often called "entitlements" — a key part of his political agenda.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 2:27 pm

People are saying that Mitt Romney's selection of Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan as his running mate creates an opportunity to hold what Ryan likes to call an "adult conversation" about entitlement spending. In the present political climate, it would be heartening to have an adult conversation about anything. But bear in mind that "entitlement" doesn't put all its cards on the table. Like a lot of effective political language, it enables you to slip from one idea to another without ever letting on that you've changed the subject.

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The Salt
10:11 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Reach For The Fries? Apple Slices Recalled For Possible Listeria Contamination

This apple-topped salad is one of several products being recalled for potential contamination with the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes
Ready Pac, Inc.

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 10:29 am

If you've been applauding yourself recently for choosing the apple slices over the french fries for your kid's fast food meal, or an apple-laden prepackaged salad for your own dinner, you might want to hit the pause button.

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Around the Nation
10:10 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Is Drought Slowly Killing US Farms?

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 11:13 am

Farmers and ranchers continue to suffer from one of the country's worst droughts in 50 years. President Obama recently announced the government will buy up to $170 million of meat from farmers. But some say it's too little too late. Guest host Jacki Lyden speaks with Virginia farmer John Boyd and Harvest Public Media reporter Peggy Lowe.

Economy
10:10 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Retail Sales Jump, But Are They High Enough?

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 4:30 pm

July saw the largest retail sales increase in months, according to the Commerce Department. But not all the news is rosy. NPR Senior Business Editor Marilyn Geewax joins guest host Jacki Lyden to take a look at consumer spending and the "back to school" season.

The Two-Way
9:31 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Florida's Biggest Python So Far Measured 17 Feet, 7 Inches; Had 87 Eggs

Florida Museum of Natural History researchers at work on the record-long Burmese python.
University of Florida

Originally published on Thu August 16, 2012 12:07 pm

She was about three feet longer than the distance from an NBA free throw line to the basket. She was a bit more than twice the height of many bedroom ceilings. You could park two Smart Cars beside her with a foot or so to spare.

Those are some ways to get a sense of just how big the biggest Burmese python discovered so far in Florida was.

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It's All Politics
9:23 am
Tue August 14, 2012

N.J. Gov. Christie To Keynote Romney's Convention

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie greets Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney in Des Moines, Iowa, on Dec. 30, 2011.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 10:09 am

The man some Republicans once hoped would be their party's 2012 presidential nominee, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, will instead deliver the keynote speech at the national convention that will make Mitt Romney the GOP's official standard-bearer.

Christie has won plaudits from Republicans for an everyman style, for taking on the New Jersey teachers unions, and for generally not suffering lightly those he considers fools — whether they're voters, members of the media or even some members of his own party.

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The Two-Way
7:50 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Retail Sales Rose 0.8 Percent In July; More Than Expected

There was a 0.8 percent increase in retail sales in July from June, the Census Bureau says, thanks in part to gains in purchases of cars, furniture and appliances.

Overall, The Associated Press says, "all major categories showed increases, a sign that consumers may be gaining confidence." If that is indeed the case, it's good news for the economy. Consumers purchase about 70 percent of all goods and services.

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The Two-Way
7:32 am
Tue August 14, 2012

F-Bomb Added To Dictionary

March 23, 2010: Vice President Biden famously drops an f-bomb.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 10:45 am

  • Vice President Biden's March 23, 2010, f-bomb (we've bleeped it)

We expect that most folks won't need to look up the definition. But just in case, "f-bomb" now has its own entry in the Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary.

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The Two-Way
6:56 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Unsealed Documents 'Hint At The Evidence' In Colorado Shootings

While a Colorado judge on Monday kept sealed most key documents in the case against Aurora movie theater shootings suspect James Holmes, the materials that have been made public do "hint at the evidence being marshaled," The Denv

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The Two-Way
6:29 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Luxury Cars Do Poorly In New Type Of Crash Test

This type of crash is particularly deadly and the first set of cars tested generally didn't provide very good protection.
Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 7:51 am

The first set of cars put through a new type of safety test did poorly even though they were "luxury and near-luxury cars" that should have the latest safety technology built in, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety reports today.

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Europe
6:06 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Alpine Championship Attracks Finger Wrestlers

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 6:17 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Around the Nation
5:58 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Striking Resemblance: Drew Brees, President Hayes

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. A listener of sports radio station WWL noticed an uncanny resemblance. Saints quarterback Drew Brees is the spitting image of the 19th president of the United States, Rutherford B. Hayes - that is, long before he grew that long, gray beard. Who knew Hayes was handsome? The station wrote a note to his presidential center, which did see the likeness, but thought the young Rutherford B. Hayes looked a lot more like Daniel Day-Lewis. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Business
4:00 am
Tue August 14, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 6:38 am

Brown became famous in the 1960s with her bestseller Sex and the Single Girl. In it, she urged single women to embrace careers and sexuality. The book led to a three decades long career editing Cosmopolitan. Brown took the magazine from dowdy home and garden coverage to a saucy handbook for single women.

Election 2012
4:00 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Obama Campaign Update

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 5:39 am

President Obama continues his campaign bus trip across Iowa. He's traveling from west to east, drawing sharp contrasts with the Republican ticket. Obama warned some jobs could be in jeopardy if a wind power tax credit is allowed to expire, as Romney has proposed.

NPR Story
3:41 am
Tue August 14, 2012

On The Road With Romney

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 5:37 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

On a Tuesday, it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Paul Ryan's addition to the Republican ticket brings a number of advantages, including youth and conservative credentials. One thing he doesn't add is racial diversity. Yesterday, Mitt Romney was campaigning in Florida, a state where more than a third of eligible voters are minorities. NPR's Ari Shapiro offers this look at whether a ticket of two white men is a disadvantage in 2012.

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Media
3:07 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Eyeing Latinos, NBC News Snuggles Up To Telemundo

Telemundo anchor and reporter Jose Diaz-Balart made a notable, if fleeting, appearance during NBC's Republican primary debate last summer. This past June, NBC News and Telemundo announced they would be collaborating on the rest of their 2012 election coverage.
Steve Mitchell AP

Originally published on Wed August 15, 2012 8:47 am

This is the second in a three-part series about major American networks trying to appeal to a broader Latino audience.

Every morning at 11:45, NBC News officials hold a conference call with their counterparts at sister networks to sort through stories of interest. Among those on the line are executives at CNBC, MSNBC and The Weather Channel; digital news editors; and executives at Telemundo, a Spanish-language broadcast network.

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Dead Stop
2:40 am
Tue August 14, 2012

A Wild Resting Place For Gunslingers And Cowboys

The Boot Hill cemetery in Tombstone, Ariz., is filled with the graves of men who met their end in the Wild West. While there are many such cemeteries in the Western U.S., Tombstone's is considered the most famous.
Ted Robbins NPR

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 8:03 am

If you're from a state once considered the "Old West," odds are you've heard of a Boot Hill graveyard. Turns out there are a number of Boot Hill cemeteries in the West, so named because many of their inhabitants died violently — with their boots on.

But of all the Boot Hill cemeteries, none is as famous as Boot Hill in Tombstone, Ariz.

It's a tough-looking place. No lawn, just gravel, mesquite trees and cactus. The graves are covered with stones to keep varmints from digging up the bones.

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All Tech Considered
2:33 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Despite Layoffs, Google's Motorola Strategy Aims At Innovation

Google's Android 3.0 Honeycomb OS is demonstrated on a Motorola Xoon tablet during a media event at Google headquarters on Feb. 2, 2011. Google acquired Motorola Mobility in August 2011 for $12.5 billion.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 4:18 pm

Google is shaking things up at its new subsidiary Motorola Mobility, announcing Monday that it will lay off 20 percent of the company's global workforce. Its strategy is to create a small division led by a technology star to spur innovation at the company that invented the cellphone.

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Around the Nation
2:33 am
Tue August 14, 2012

La. Court In Racially Charged Power Struggle, Again

Justice Bernette Johnson is at the center of a legal battle over whether she will be the next chief justice of the Louisiana Supreme Court.
Louisiana Supreme Court AP

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 4:00 am

A power struggle on the Louisiana Supreme Court is headed to federal court this week. Lawyers are seeking to reopen an old voting rights case that gave the Deep South state its first black Supreme Court justice. What's at stake in the racially charged fight is whether Louisiana will now have its first African-American chief justice.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:32 am
Tue August 14, 2012

How A Virus In Snakes Could Offer Clues To Ebola In Humans

A newly discovered disease in boa constrictors could provide the missing link in the latent Ebola virus.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 12:55 pm

Scientists have found a surprising link between deadly Ebola virus and a disease that's been killing boa constrictors in zoos and aquariums.

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Africa
2:31 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Once Safe, Cairo's Streets Now Plagued By Crime

A car burns after riots break out in front of a luxury hotel in central Cairo on Aug. 2. Cairo and other parts of Egypt have seen an increase in crime and lawlessness since the country's revolution last year.
AP

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 4:00 am

Voices echo in what once was a bustling women's fitness center in suburban Cairo. The two-story facility is full of modern equipment, but it's covered with a thin layer of dust.

Sally Salema, 28, opened the gym in 2008 because she wanted a place to exercise without having to worry about men seeing her with her veil off.

The facility included a kids' area and nursery, Salema says, so that mothers could bring their children. There's also a cafe, several classrooms and even a massage room that still smells faintly of lavender.

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The Salt
2:30 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Crayfish Go On The Menu To Restore Lake Tahoe's Blue Hue

A commercially harvested crayfish from Lake Tahoe near Incline Village, Nev., in July.
Max Whittaker Prime for NPR

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 10:30 am

Around the country, environmentalists are cooking up ways to battle invasive species by serving them up on a platter.

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Million-Dollar Donors
2:26 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Melons, Squash, Cash: A Million-Dollar Donor Sprouts

Amy Goldman, known for her gardens and her illustrated coffee-table books about plants, has donated $1 million to a pro-Obama superPAC.
Sandi Fellman

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 1:22 pm

Amy Goldman is best known as the author of lavish books about heirloom tomatoes, squash and melons. Now Goldman is trying to cultivate a second term for President Obama.

Goldman wrote a check for $1 million to a pro-Obama superPAC — and gave another million to the political arm of Planned Parenthood.

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Middle East
2:03 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Palestinians Fear New Israeli Moves In West Bank

Israeli army tractors demolish a Palestinian home on Nov. 24, 2011, in the village of Yatta near Hebron, reported to be in Area C, an Israeli-controlled section of the West Bank. Recently, Israel has issued orders to evacuate and demolish more Palestinian communities in Area C, the largest section of the West Bank.
Abed Al Hashlamoun EPA/Landov

Originally published on Sun August 19, 2012 8:25 am

Peace talks between Israel and the Palestinians have been frozen for almost two years. But Palestinians say that doesn't mean events aren't happening on the ground.

Recently, the Israeli military issued orders calling for evacuation and demolition of nearly a dozen Palestinian communities in the occupied West Bank. Palestinians see this as evidence of Israeli plans to annex the territory, though Israel denies this.

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The Torch
6:10 pm
Mon August 13, 2012

The Torch Is Out: Olympic Moments Will Burn On

Three photos show the Olympic flame slowly extinguishing at London's Olympic Stadium, as the London 2012 Games come to an end. The next Summer Olympics will be in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Damien Meyer AFP/Getty Images

It's time to extinguish The Torch, and end NPR's three-week marathon of Olympic coverage. From the London Games' opening ceremony through 302 medal events, these Summer Olympics have fed fans a rich diet of history and spectacle. I only wish I'd been able to eat it all — but part of the Olympics' allure is that its smorgasbord is over-stuffed with intense competition.

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