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Amy Goodman — the host of the left-leaning Democracy Now news program will not face criminal charges for her coverage of an oil pipeline protest in North Dakota last month. At least not for now — prosecutors say they may still bring charges later.

On Sept. 3, Goodman and her crew captured images of security teams with dogs trying to keep protesters from entering a pipeline construction site. She wanted to know if security members were "telling the dogs to bite the protesters?"

Fewer than 1 in 5 members of Congress are women. At Fortune 500 companies, fewer than 1 in 20 CEOs are women. And if you look at all the presidents of the United States through Barack Obama, what are the odds of having 44 presidents who are all men?

If men and women had an equal shot at the White House, the odds of this happening just by chance are about 1 in 18 trillion.

Even after Nov. 8, no matter who is elected, many don't expect the partisan infighting that has highlighted this year's unusually ugly campaign to come to an end.

But in an interview with NPR's Robert Siegel, Vice President Biden struck a hopeful tone, saying that Hillary Clinton and Democrats could be effective if she wins the presidency.

Retired Marine Gen. James E. Cartwright pleaded guilty to a single count of making false statements to federal authorities. The investigators were looking into a leak of classified information about a secret cyberattack on Iran's nuclear facilities.

The plea came in a brief appearance in U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C.

What happens when two human political journalists compete against a computer over which can do the best job predicting the issues that will dominate the news in the presidential election? Well, you are about to find out.

Nearly 1 in 5 children each year suffers a psychiatric illness, according to research estimates. But a national shortage of medical specialists and inpatient facilities means that many still go untreated — despite national efforts to improve mental health care.

Transcript: Sen. Tim Kaine's Remarks at Pneuma Church on October 16, 2016

Buenos días a todos. Estoy bien contento a visitar con ustedes en el Pneuma Church y doy gracias al Reverendo García y su familia tan especial para la oportunidad a charla un momentito con ustedes.

The Austrian government says it plans to tear down the house where Adolf Hitler was born to prevent the property from being a pilgrimage site for neo-Nazis.

This comes after a long fight with the current owner, who for years has rejected the government's attempts to purchase the property located in Braunau, near the German border. Now, the government intends to confiscate it, reporter Kerry Skyring in Vienna tells our Newscast unit.

A newly released report describes disintegrating mental health among dozens of the more than 1,100 people being held by Australia on the Pacific island nation of Nauru.

The report out Monday from Amnesty International is based largely on interviews conducted by Anna Neistat, a researcher working for the watchdog group, in July with 58 people being held on the island. It focuses on self-harm, calling it "shockingly commonplace."

Thirteen years ago, just as the United States began what was to become its longest war, a futuristic wheelchair hit the market.

The iBOT allowed paralyzed people, including many veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan, to stand up by rising to eye level. It also did something no wheelchair ever had: climb stairs.

A Florida judge has sentenced a man who shot at George Zimmerman during a confrontation to 20 years in prison.

Zimmerman fatally shot unarmed black teenager Trayvon Martin in Florida in 2012 in a case that struck a chord nationwide. He was later acquitted of all charges.

Donald Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner appears to be looking into setting up a Trump television network after the November election, according to reporting today from the Financial Times.

Movie star Burt Reynolds started acting in the 1960s and has made dozens of films since. He’s written a memoir that looks at his life and career, “But Enough About Me.”

He spoke with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about his journey in film, and those who influenced him along the way.

North Korea recently completed its fifth ballistic missile launch. It’s a move that defies growing international consensus that views the secretive, nuclear-armed nation as a grave threat to international order.

While it’s received relatively little attention in the U.S. presidential campaign, North Korea could be the next president’s thorniest foreign policy problem, according to some international relations experts.

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If you feel like Internet ads are more pervasive and invasive than ever before, you're not alone. Author Tim Wu tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that the Web has gotten worse over the years, not better — and unrelenting ads are to blame.

"I think you spend 50 percent of your mental energy trying to defeat ad systems," Wu says. "It's amazing that we've got this great scientific invention, the Web and the Internet, and then it has come to the point where using it reminds me of swatting mosquitoes."

Last summer, I went on Morning Edition to talk about the quest for a great-tasting tomato. And at the very end of the conversation, I confidently declared that no one should ever put tomatoes in the refrigerator. It kills the taste, I said. That's what I'd heard from scientists and tomato growers alike.

Monday night, Americans can watch a documentary about China that's not yet been officially shown in mainland China because of its subject matter. Hooligan Sparrow is about six schoolgirls, ages 11 to 14, who in 2013 were allegedly taken by their principal to a hotel in another town, where he and another man sexually assaulted them. The film airs on the POV series on PBS.

"Hooligan Sparrow" is activist Ye Haiyan's nickname. She's previously campaigned for the rights of sex workers. The film is about her efforts to get justice for the girls.

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

The governing body for men's tennis has suspended Australian star Nick Kyrgios for three months, or eight tournament weeks, after he essentially threw his second-round match last week at the Shanghai Masters.

Kyrgios often appeared uninterested during the match against German player Mischa Sverev, lobbing soft, slow serves over the net and wandering away before Sverev could return them. He bickered with the umpire and a fan during the match, and was quickly defeated at 6-3 and 6-1. ESPN has provided video of some of the more dramatic moments:

Parents' views of child care are a little like life in Lake Wobegon — the vast majority say it's way above average.

That's just one of the findings in a poll looking at child care and health from NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, released Monday.

In it, we found that a remarkable 88 percent rated their child care as "very good" or "excellent."

Democratic vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine spoke to a church group in Miami over the weekend.

That wouldn't be remarkable except that he spoke entirely in Spanish — a first for a candidate on a major-party ticket.

"Yo soy cristiano, un católico" ("I'm a Christian, a Catholic") Kaine told parishioners at Pneuma Church at the beginning of his five-minute speech.

Kaine described his background working as a missionary in Honduras, where he said he learned lessons about faith, family and hard work.

Rodents are generally the last things most restaurant owners want in their kitchen.

But in the larger cities of Peru, chefs are practically fighting over guinea pigs in a restaurant craze that is bringing financial stability — if not exactly wealth — to small farmers in the Andes Mountains.

The high school graduation rate in the U.S. reached an all-time high of 83 percent in the 2014-2015 school year, President Obama announced today, marking the fifth straight record-setting year.

Achievement gaps have narrowed even as all boats have risen. Graduation rates range from 90 percent for students who identify as Asian/Pacific Islanders to 64 percent for students with disabilities.

The activist organization WikiLeaks says the Internet connection for its founder, Julian Assange, has been severed by what it called a "state party."

The accusation came in a tweet early Monday.

The long-awaited Iraqi military offensive to retake Mosul from ISIS has begun.

Backed by U.S. air support, Iraqi army troops and allied Kurdish fighters are advancing on the city from two fronts, the south and northeast, as NPR's Alice Fordham tells Morning Edition. They say they're making progress but face resistance from ISIS militants who have been in control of the area for more than two years.

A defamation trial against Rolling Stone, based on a 2014 article about an alleged rape on the campus of the University of Virginia, got underway in federal court on Monday.

The magazine retracted the story after scrutiny revealed inconsistencies. The trial beginning now involves a former dean at the school who has sued for $7.85 million over her portrayal in the piece.

Jury selection in the case began early Monday at a federal court in Charlottesville, Va., The Associated Press reports.

The Islamic State forced the world to take notice when the extremist group overran Mosul, the second largest city in Iraq, in June 2014.

Just months earlier, President Obama had described ISIS as "the JV team." But by August 2014, the U.S. was bombing ISIS in Iraq, and early Monday, the U.S. teamed up with the Iraqi army and other allies in a major offensive to recapture the northern Iraqi city.

An experimental lander from the European Space Agency is making its final descent toward Mars, preparing for a controlled landing on Wednesday.

The Schiaparelli probe detached from its mothership, the Trace Gas Orbiter, on Sunday.

There was a moment of alarm when, after separating from the ship, Schiaparelli didn't send the expected signals back to scientists on earth. It did send back a "carrier signal" to show it was operational, but didn't communicate any telemetry data about its status or location.

Politics In The News: Debate Prep

Oct 17, 2016
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Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton will face off again this week in their third and last presidential debate. This time it will be in Las Vegas on Wednesday. Over the weekend, Donald Trump again raised the idea that this election is being rigged against him.